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  1. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Moore, Oklahoma, United States
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    4,145
    Quote Originally Posted by 545GAlady View Post
    There's one supply in each bedroom and they are all 8 inch. Same with the size of the returns in the bedrooms.
    I doubt that would be causing the short cycling. It could lead to uneven room temperatures.

  2. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    373
    Quote Originally Posted by 54regcab View Post
    I doubt that would be causing the short cycling. It could lead to uneven room temperatures.
    I would agree that it wouldn't be the cause of the short cycling. So you are saying that having a return in every room could cause uneven room temperatures?

  3. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Moore, Oklahoma, United States
    Posts
    4,145
    Improperly sized ductwork would cause uneven room temperatures. If a certain room is always not getting enough heat/cool then you could have a ductwork issue. Return or supply could be undersized or oversized.

  4. #30
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    373
    Quote Originally Posted by 54regcab View Post
    Improperly sized ductwork would cause uneven room temperatures. If a certain room is always not getting enough heat/cool then you could have a ductwork issue. Return or supply could be undersized or oversized.
    I get the idea now, thanks. I'm starting to think that the main reason why the temperatures are unbalanced is because the room with the high ceilings (my daughter's bedroom) faces the sun the majority of the day which warms the room up. That creates the issue of the other two bedrooms having cooler temperatures because their ceilings are 8 ft and they don't get sunlight for a long period of the day. I'll talk to the tech about it on Tuesday when he comes.

  5. #31
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    373
    I do believe that the ductwork is sized properly. I also think that zoning won't be a good idea because there's only three bedrooms upstairs and I wouldn't be able to afford it.

  6. #32
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Moore, Oklahoma, United States
    Posts
    4,145
    Be careful on the sunny room. It will usually be warmer than the rest unless zoning is implemented. Cutting airflow in winter to cool the room off would make it hotter in summer. Our master bedroom we like it cooler year round. A simple manual damper in the attic is what I used. Open fully by summer, open about 1/2 way in winter. "redneck zone control" if you will

    Location of the return helps, but it's normally determined when the house it built. Low returns help in rooms that are cold all the time, high returns help in rooms that are hot all the time. I considered installing a high return to our master bedroom, but the damper valve was easier to install.

  7. #33
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    373
    Quote Originally Posted by 54regcab View Post
    Be careful on the sunny room. It will usually be warmer than the rest unless zoning is implemented. Cutting airflow in winter to cool the room off would make it hotter in summer. Our master bedroom we like it cooler year round. A simple manual damper in the attic is what I used. Open fully by summer, open about 1/2 way in winter. "redneck zone control" if you will

    Location of the return helps, but it's normally determined when the house it built. Low returns help in rooms that are cold all the time, high returns help in rooms that are hot all the time. I considered installing a high return to our master bedroom, but the damper valve was easier to install.
    A manual damper could work. I will still ask the tech how much the cost would be if we separated the room with high ceilings into a separate zone from the rest of the upstairs, but just having a manual damper or the "redneck zone control" would be much simpler and much much cheaper.

    All of the returns are located in the ceiling since the furnace is installed in the attic. Our basement system is different with the supplies in the ceiling and the returns on the lower wall.

  8. #34
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Moore, Oklahoma, United States
    Posts
    4,145
    The redneck zone control won't be as precise, will require some manual fine tuning on your part, and will require a trip to the attic to change it once a season. If you can live with those shortfalls, do it the easy way A 2 zone control will be more complicated but offer more control.

  9. #35
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    373
    Update.... I talked to the tech yesterday when he was here about zoning and the price was too high. I'm starting to think that since my daughter is off to college next year, my son could just move his bedroom to her room or to the basement. Pretty much that means that we will say no to zoning or adding a manual damper and have my son go ahead and move to the basement if he wants to! Or he can just dress in more layers while in his current room! Thanks for all of the advice anyways.

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