purge
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  1. #1

    purge

    what does a purge do in a chiller

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
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    South Georgia
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    Trane has a good explanation. Here is a link.....
    http://www.austincc.edu/hart/lab-mat..._ctv_eb_84.pdf

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Removes non-condensibles from LOW pressure centrifugal chillers (R-11, R-113, R-123 refrigerants) and absorbers (different animal). Evaporator runs in a vacuum, (R-113 condenser also in vacuum or low positive) leaks (on low side) will suck air in.
    Sic Semper Tyrannis.

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    some freezing metal shed somewheres
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    a purge on an absorption chiller is just a good sized vacuum pump.

    a purge on a low pressure chiller separates out noncondensibles by sucking gas off the top of the condenser and running it through a little refrigeration loop. condensed refrigerant gets returned, anything that doesn't condense gets pumped out of the top of a seperator tank by a little vaccum pump.

    why are you asking?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by automig View Post
    a purge on an absorption chiller is just a good sized vacuum pump.

    a purge on a low pressure chiller separates out noncondensibles by sucking gas off the top of the condenser and running it through a little refrigeration loop. condensed refrigerant gets returned, anything that doesn't condense gets pumped out of the top of a seperator tank by a little vaccum pump.

    why are you asking?
    I'm just guessin', here - 'cause he wants to know?

  6. #6
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    Nov 2008
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    some freezing metal shed somewheres
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    well, if he's cheating on a test my answer's the most useful.

    if he's standing in front of a turboguard with a crescent wrench, the customer is royally screwed.

  7. #7
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    Dec 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by automig View Post
    well, if he's cheating on a test my answer's the most useful.

    if he's standing in front of a turboguard with a crescent wrench, the customer is royally screwed.
    If he's standing in front of a Turboguard with a crescent wrench or taking a test on a Turboguard and he's using your post to get pointed in the right direction then I have to say that he and the customer are screwed. A Turboguard doesn't have a vacuum pump on it.

    And saying that an absorption purge is nothing but a vacuum pump is quite a bit oversimplified no matter how you look at it.

  8. #8
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    thx fellas ., this helps explain the question i was asking.,

    knew york::: i agree with you about deleteing ones own post.
    no signature blast'em man blast'em
    !!!KILL THE TERRORIST!!!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by automig View Post
    a purge on an absorption chiller is just a good sized vacuum pump.


    a purge on a low pressure chiller separates out noncondensibles by sucking gas off the top of the condenser and running it through a little refrigeration loop. condensed refrigerant gets returned, anything that doesn't condense gets pumped out of the top of a seperator tank by a little vaccum pump.

    why are you asking?
    Not all purge units have a refrigeration circuit

  10. #10
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    Really? I thought That they did, which brand are you referring to? Which is the other method?

  11. #11
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    Really? I thought That they did, which brand are you referring to?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    3,103
    The York Turboguard purge doesn't use a refrigeration circuit. It uses oil pressure, a small pump, some solenoid valves, and the differential refrigerant pressure created by the chiller when it's running to separate non-condensables from the refrigerant.
    "There is no greater inequality than the equal treatment of unequals."

    -Thomas Jefferson

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    U.A. (upper Alabama)
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    827
    The turbo guard does have a refrigeration circuit. It is an evap. coil inside the tank, although it is using the refrigerant from the chiller.

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