Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 23
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    106

    Chevy Van seats hurt my lower back.....

    Not sure where to post this but anyway.... I've been working in this field for about 5 months now. On my very first day, 10 minutes deep into the ride along, I noticed the seat was hurting my lower back. I don't know what it is about these Chevy Van seats, but they are doing a number on my back. I'm 31 years old and have never had back problems before. Any body else notice this? Guess I need to get some kind of pillow huh? At least to keep in my own van.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Suffolk, Long Island New York
    Posts
    22
    try a lumber support cushion. Probably could be found at any local auto store

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Richmond, working under tarps
    Posts
    483
    Quote Originally Posted by greenhorn520 View Post
    Not sure where to post this but anyway.... I've been working in this field for about 5 months now. On my very first day, 10 minutes deep into the ride along, I noticed the seat was hurting my lower back. I don't know what it is about these Chevy Van seats, but they are doing a number on my back. I'm 31 years old and have never had back problems before. Any body else notice this? Guess I need to get some kind of pillow huh? At least to keep in my own van.
    07 diesel savana I got gives me the same lower back pain.......I'm thinking of re bolstering it.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    64
    I concur with NDJ22. Your back pain is probably coming from poor (or no) lumbar support. I recently had to drive the shop beater while my truck was in for repairs after getting a love tap from an International 4300 tow truck. Long story short, this thing was 12 years old with a quarter million miles on it, and it was killing my back. If you don't want to drop any cash on a lumbar support pillow, then try out this trick that a physical therapist friend taught me: fold a bath towel long ways, roll it up like a cylinder, and then tie it with a shoestring (or electrical tape, just something to keep it from unrolling on you). Put this behind your low back when you're in the van. This'll help give your back some of the support that it needs, and force you to sit with better posture (the idea being to keep the curve in your spine when you sit). My regular truck has lumbar support, and I don't have to deal with back pain when driving it, but I've found this towel method helpful to keep me from slumping over whilst driving other vans.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Sandy, Utah
    Posts
    93
    I went on a job once where the sales guy doing the bid asked me if I would "donate" the 5 hour travel time to and from the job. (NO! was my reply) After pulling the compressor on the roof through the roof hatch and installing it then getting the bad compressor off the roof (fortunately I could drop it off instead of taking down the ladder) I found myself the next day going to the chiropractor to try to get my ba k feeling any better. Only to find out a few weeks later that this sales man who did the bid had included a crane as part of the bill without letting me know about it. Ironically this same sales man had broken his back as a service tech and went into sales due to injuries. Why do I tell you this story? Because perhaps its more that than your drivers seat that is causing your pain. Just a thought.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Sandy, Utah
    Posts
    93
    I went on a job once where the sales guy doing the bid asked me if I would "donate" the 5 hour travel time to and from the job. (NO! was my reply) After pulling the compressor on the roof through the roof hatch and installing it then getting the bad compressor off the roof (fortunately I could drop it off instead of taking down the ladder) I found myself the next day going to the chiropractor to try to get my ba k feeling any better. Only to find out a few weeks later that this sales man who did the bid had included a crane as part of the bill without letting me know about it. Ironically this same sales man had broken his back as a service tech and went into sales due to injuries. Why do I tell you this story? Because perhaps its more that than your drivers seat that is causing your pain. Just a thought.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Sandy, Utah
    Posts
    93
    Sorry about the "double" post. And as a follow up. Others have great suggestions about lumbar support. I agree with them. Just want to give a little advice to all... Don't do as I have done.... after 33 years in this field with two back surgeries behind me due to blowing out disc's from lifting. Just be careful out there and don't let sales guys take advantage of you. It hurts!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    64
    You can use a simple one-to-one pulley system to get a hermetic on/off the roof when you don't have a crane. If you're lucky enough to have an RTU close to the edge of the roof, you can attach a single-sheave pulley to it to use this method. After you've pulled out the old compressor, you place it on the edge of the roof, attach one end of the rope to it, run your rope through the pulley, attach the other end to the compressor on the ground. If you're swapping like-for-like, then both compressors will balance each other out to where you hardly have to exert yourself when you pull the compressor up. Even if you have a slightly different compressor, you only have to lift the difference in the weight between the two. As you pull the new compressor up, the old one gets lowered to the ground. And since they both weigh the same, you can just stop to take a break whenever you want and leave them hanging mid-lift. I've done this with hermetics up to 6 tons with no problems.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Sandy, Utah
    Posts
    93
    Genius idea. I've never heard or thought of that. As you mentioned its best to have the available roof top unit next to the edge but even if it were in 10 or 20 feet I imagine its still possible. Also I guess you would need the pulley facing the right way. Correct? Also a question. How could you keep the compressors from sliding up against the wall of the building as you get them up and down? Thanks for the idea.
    Mark

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Wichita Ks
    Posts
    1,458
    a ladder crane works fairly good if you dont exceed the weight. but watch out for osha working that close to the edge of the roof or be sure you are tied off like they want you to.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    64
    "How could you keep the compressors from sliding up against the wall of the building as you get them up and down?"

    I've only ever done this on the back sides of buildings where it doesn't really matter if I bang up the wall (which I haven't). I only concern myself with not damaging the new compressor on the way up, and I've yet to damage one. I suppose if you have a helper with you that you could secure a tag line to the new compressor to keep it from rolling around and banging the suction or discharge ports against the wall. Seems like every one that I've lifted, though, tends to lean away from the wall since the lifting eye is located on the side of the top of the compressor shell. You don't get the thrill of giving the old compressor the "express elevator", though.
    Speaking from experience, don't ever give an 06D the "express elevator" treatment into a flower bed unless you really intend to just bury it right there.
    Last edited by Antarctic Fox; 10-22-2012 at 02:37 PM.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    64
    Also, if you tell the service manager or the salesmen that you know this "trick", then they'll never, ever include a boom truck or crane in a hermetic changeout bid on anything under 7.5t for you again. It's just nice to know for those times when those guys low ball a bid and don't get you one. Always nice to let a machine do all that back-breaking work for you in the safest way possible. As I always say, "I'm not getting hurt so that someone else can be comfortable."

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Sandy, Utah
    Posts
    93
    Thanks for the tip. And I agree on your words of wisdom. I'm just sorry I didn't learn it before screwing my back up. Fortunately the surgery worked for me and my back is good. Just have to keep it that way.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event