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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    2

    Question

    I own a 2-story home with zoned space pack A/C. In my backyard are two condensers, each resting on what appears to be a plastic pad. This system is about 6 years old (I have only lived here 2 years). The condensers are starting to list (lean over), and they look like they've sunk into the ground a bit, to the point where there is a lot of dirt/mud around the base of the units, even though I cleaned them out last spring. My thought is that these condensers should be temporarily removed, and that a concrete slab be installed on top of gravel/sand, and then the condensors be re-installed. One contractor said that they could be mounted on rails (basically L-shaped supports that are anchored to the foundation of my house), which holds them 3-6" above grade. Does this sound like a good choice? Is there an industry standard for how these condensers should be mounted and supported? The current pads are not keeping them level, and are such that too much dirt/mud is getting to them, surely decreasing efficiency, and possibly threatening their usability. Any suggestions for how these SHOULD be configured?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    9,548
    Are you in a snow area? if so they usually mount those pads off the ground on pump ups(stands). If not, you might be able to gingerly lift the unit and have the pad re-leveled heightened. Ask your contractor.
    If everything was always done "by the book"....the book would never change.

  3. #3
    No offense, but you should use a contractor called common sense here and you actually never should allowed them to get to a state where they are sinking in. lol.

    You do not need any contractor for this, but you need to take off half of your lazy Saturday off. Buy concrete specific for building foundations. Layout the concrete 1 feet deep and 6 inches above ground for the size of the AC plus extra 6 inches on each side. Buy vibration pads for AC and mount them on top of concrete. Either glue or bolts will do the trick. Make sure to join the two in a very nice way. No garbage here. It has to look nice; it is part of the house.

    You can "throw in" rebar, wire, metal, stone, brick or glass into the concrete for extra support. You can improve the structure for the concrete by walking for 5 minutes in the ditch.

    Now if you are in a snow area do a search on Google. They sell special AC covers for snow. Just never turn on the AC in the winter especially when half of it is underground already.




    [Edited by easybend on 10-19-2006 at 03:04 PM]

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    9,548
    if you kink those linesets you'll wish you had used a contractor.....you can use (EASYBEND's) advise.
    If everything was always done "by the book"....the book would never change.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    2

    Condensers

    I am definitely going to hire a contractor to address this situation; I have no interest in kinking the linesets - I just want to know a.) if there is legitimacy in one contractor's 'rails' idea; and b.) if there are industry standards for how these condensers are supposed to be positioned/situated.
    Thanks -

  6. #6
    AC has to be leveled (perfectly). Some code requires easy access (again common sense). It's nice to protect them against floods/water.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    1,398

    Re: Condensers

    Originally posted by dbp000
    I am definitely going to hire a contractor to address this situation; I have no interest in kinking the linesets - I just want to know a.) if there is legitimacy in one contractor's 'rails' idea; and b.) if there are industry standards for how these condensers are supposed to be positioned/situated.
    Thanks -
    Yes. Mitsubishi and Sanyo both offer the rails as options and I know of one distributor that has a generic set they sell. I'm sure other mini-split manufacturers offer them also. I think it is the best idea.

    If that cannot work for any reason have the condensers moved, build a firm level base 2-4" deep of crushed stone then pour 4" concrete on that. Try to have the finished top 2" above grade. Put rubber isolation pads under the condensers when they are re-installed.
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