Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    60
    Post Likes

    Carrier 24HNB9 compressor failure after 3 months... cause for long term concern?

    Hello.

    Back in June I installed a new Carrier Heat pump (25hnb924A003 -- 2 ton 2-speed 19 seer).

    It worked quite nicely throughout the summer. In September, with the pleasant weather here (Maryland)
    I shut off heating and cooling.

    Two days ago my hvac company came out for the fall maintenance. Turning on the heat pump revealed -- no heat!
    Fan coil pushes air, and the compressor seems to run (i.e.; cooling fan spins).
    The maintenance guy checks pressure levels, listens to a clicking noise from the compressor, and deduces that the scroll motor is malfunctioning. Which means it needs to be replaced.

    It is well under warranty, and I don't need heating or cooling for another month, so this is not a short-term problem.
    But why would this happen? I don't push the system much (most of the time it was running in dehumidify mode, and the house is only 1300sq feet). Even if I was pushing the system --3 months?

    So did I just get unlucky? The only weird thing I might of done is turning on heat mode accidentally, and then
    turning it off right away. But I can't imagine that (with all the delays the Infinity 'stat has built into it) would cause any
    kind of problems.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Anderson, South Carolina, United States
    Posts
    19,699
    Post Likes
    Just make sure that when the compressor is replaced that they pull a proper vacuum on the system with a micron gauge down to 500 microns.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    60
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter

    pulling vacumn

    Quote Originally Posted by jtrammel View Post
    Just make sure that when the compressor is replaced that they pull a proper vacuum on the system with a micron gauge down to 500 microns.
    Thanks for the tip. It's always a bit of a challenge telling workmen such technical chores (they tend to look at homeowners as meddlesome dopes), but there are ways..

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Anderson, South Carolina, United States
    Posts
    19,699
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by danielh View Post
    Thanks for the tip. It's always a bit of a challenge telling workmen such technical chores (they tend to look at homeowners as meddlesome dopes), but there are ways..
    I agree, I don't like it when homeowners tell me how to do my job but it is their house so I just smile and do what they want me to as long as it is not a task that will have adverse reactions, in that case I smile and explain why I can't do that. Some hvac guys don't even know what a micron gauge is much less how to use it. If they don't use a gauge and pull a vac down to 500 microns, or manufacture recommended level, then they could be leaving moisture in the system that will ruin vital components throughout the system.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    60
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter

    meddlesome homeowners occassionally correct :)

    Quote Originally Posted by jtrammel View Post
    I agree, I don't like it when homeowners tell me how to do my job but it is their house so I just smile and do what they want me to as long as it is not a task that will have adverse reactions, in that case I smile and explain why I can't do that. Some hvac guys don't even know what a micron gauge is much less how to use it. If they don't use a gauge and pull a vac down to 500 microns, or manufacture recommended level, then they could be leaving moisture in the system that will ruin vital components throughout the system.
    Can't say as I blame you, but sometimes we (homeowners) spend a lot of time researching a particular system (the one we are gettting in$talled).

    For example, I installed this system in parallel with an existing hydronic system (so I didn't bother installing resistance heaters). That makes is a bit complex;
    speaking loosely: the Infinity thermostat has to tell the boiler when to turn on (i.e.; when oat is low). This requires installing a special kit in the fan coil, that reports itself to the
    Infinity as a hydronic system. BTW: I learned this detail from asking on this site!

    Well, when they installed the system they didn't get that right. So the higher grade tech had to pay a visit, and he looked at the manual and discovered the reference
    to the special kit. At which point I smiled and handed over the 2 page spec sheet for the part. He took it well!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor MagazineThe place where Electrical professionals meet.