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Thread: York boo-boo?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    TUCSON, AZ
    Posts
    49
    Our company installed 4 York rooftop units a couple of years ago for a Big lots have had no problems until recently one had a grounded compressor. While doing the procedure to replace I noticed a sporlan C-164 liquid line drier on the discharge line(by the way these are heat pumps, MN BAVA-T060AB)I checked the other 3, same thing. Needless to say i removed the drier and intalled a bi-directional one in the liqiid line. Is this a screw-up that got overlooked? or does York beleive the drier will act as a muffler? Sporlan designed it to function as a liquid line drier, in my 30 years never heard of a discharge line drier. Any guys seen this?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    239
    Yep. York in its not so infinite wisdom did this, It is the patented York Self Destruct Device, or YSDD. The dryer is constructed so that it cannot blow apart internally like the alcos do, instead the dessicant cracks and grinds it's self into a powder that goes through the strainer and winds up in the oil sump and kills compressors. York, Guarantees work for the Serviceman.

  3. #3
    Tip...Stock up on new TXV's for this location, you will need them.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    6,579


    As a York factory instructor I can tell you that the installation of the filter-drier in the discharge line of the compressor is not a "screw up".

    A great deal of research was done before this design was given the green light.

    Norm

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    186
    The ones I have seen that have come apart generally have undersized duct work that cause higher than normal discharge temps during heating mode. have lots of units running with no problems.
    TANSTAAFL - There ain't no such thing as a free lunch!

  6. #6
    NormChris, please explain your statement.

    I called Sporlan. They do not reccomend placing the liquid line dryer in the discharge line.

    Sporlan says there is not much chance of the core breaking up, but the moisture capacity is greatly diminished.

    What could be the possible benefit in this? Is the purpose to save York from using the more expensive reversible driers in their heat pumps?






    [Edited by tucsonbill on 10-13-2006 at 10:00 AM]

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    2,987
    Placing the filter-drier in the common discharge does have the benefit of protecting the reversing valve from debris. As I recall, this was an issue when these units were designed.

    Yes, this is generally a lower cost approach when compared to a reversing filter-drier.

    The lowest cost approach is, of course, not to use a filter-drier at all.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    South Dakota
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    6,579
    Originally posted by tucsonbill
    NormChris, please explain your statement.

    I called Sporlan. They do not reccomend placing the liquid line dryer in the discharge line.

    Sporlan says there is not much chance of the core breaking up, but the moisture capacity is greatly diminished.

    What could be the possible benefit in this? Is the purpose to save York from using the more expensive reversible driers in their heat pumps?






    [Edited by tucsonbill on 10-13-2006 at 10:00 AM]

    A great deal of research was done in the York testing lab before this was approved. It is true that the ability of the drier to absorb moisture is greater at reduced temperatures however we upsized the drier to provide protection.

    We have been doing this for many years and our warranty issues regarding this approach has been zero.

    Yes, this allows us to save cost of installing a biflow drier. It works and has for many years.

    Norm

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Wichita Ks
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    1,467
    coleman did this back in the 80's. now it is York. The problem is it is harder to detect a partly restricted drier.
    You can have a high discharge pressure and a lower condensing pressure and not notice it. Driers need to be where you can check a pressure drop and check temperature drop.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    6,579
    Originally posted by freonrick
    coleman did this back in the 80's. now it is York. The problem is it is harder to detect a partly restricted drier.
    You can have a high discharge pressure and a lower condensing pressure and not notice it. Driers need to be where you can check a pressure drop and check temperature drop.

    Coleman is York. Just a difference in branding. Same assembly line.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    26
    I was working on some climatemaster water source heatpumps rooftop units today that do the samething. They look like reg package units with economizers ect but have condenser water and heat exchangers. They also have a sporlan liquid line drier in the discharge.

  12. #12
    I'm just shaking my head. Maybe its just because for 30 years of my experience it was supposed to be a cardinal sin to do this. I still don't think I could put one in. I'll have to go with the reversible liquid line drier.
    (no offense, NormChris).

    I remember back when I did residential York was putting little "pencil" molecular sieve liquid line dryers in their 5 ton and under condensing units that plugged up on a regular basis. The screens, anyways.

    Well, I'm not doubting NormChris's word, and Sporlan said it was OK. Guess we'll see how it all plays out.


  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    2,987
    Originally posted by tucsonbill
    Maybe its just because for 30 years of my experience it was supposed to be a cardinal sin to do this.
    You may still consider it a cardinal sin if you attempt to replace the core-type filter-driers used in this application with a bead-type filter-drier.

    Or placing a filter-drier in the discharge line of a straight a/c unit. It makes no sense here.

    Otherwise, consider it good practice to use liquid line bi-flow filter-driers on residential heat pump system. Norm will have no problems here.

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