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Thread: diesel engines

  1. #1
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    Feb 2013
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    diesel engines

    just wondering at what temp and for how long before the fuel begins to flow again?

  2. #2
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    That depends on the type and the amount of fuel additive. Typically if these engines are going to be asked to run in very low temperatures, you want to add an anti gel additive to the fuel.

    We used to run into the same thing when I was flying jets. There's a commercial product that is automatically metered along with the fuel when you fill up, called Prist. You have to tell the ramp manager that you want it, and you pay extra for it. This prevents your jet A fuel, which is actually a highly refined version of kerosene, from getting too thick to run through the fuel lines. If that happens, you could risk a flame out.

    Without a fuel additive, #2 deisel oil starts to thicken up at less than about 9 degrees F, and I have seen total lack of flow at around 5 degrees F.
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  3. #3
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    Feb 2013
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    thanks! boss didn't know to add that to his truck and it died on him. i was just wondering how long it would take before it will be able to start again, guess we'll know today. at least it stayed above 0 last night.
    Quote Originally Posted by timebuilder View Post
    That depends on the type and the amount of fuel additive. Typically if these engines are going to be asked to run in very low temperatures, you want to add an anti gel additive to the fuel.

    We used to run into the same thing when I was flying jets. There's a commercial product that is automatically metered along with the fuel when you fill up, called Prist. You have to tell the ramp manager that you want it, and you pay extra for it. This prevents your jet A fuel, which is actually a highly refined version of kerosene, from getting too thick to run through the fuel lines. If that happens, you could risk a flame out.

    Without a fuel additive, #2 deisel oil starts to thicken up at less than about 9 degrees F, and I have seen total lack of flow at around 5 degrees F.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
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    Dover, DE
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    If it gelled, go to the auto parts store and buy a bottle of diesel 911, and add some to the tank and also right in the filter if possible. Let it sit a few minutes and try and start. If possible move it to a warm space.
    When you do get it going make sure he only uses high volume fuel stations, not mom and pop stops. Also good to use a good conditioner to prevent gelling and help lubricity.
    I use power service, the white bottle in the winter and gray in summer.

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