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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Princeton NJ
    Posts
    125

    Insulation over furnace pvc vent pipe

    Hi,
    My equipment room has insulated walls next to the basement living area, but no insulation on the ceiling where there is a family room. I was planning on putting some fiberglass batts up there, vapor barrier against the floor (hot side). The direct vent/air intact pvc pipes are tucked between rafters. Can I lazily lay fiberglass insulation over them (paper side to them)? The intake would be cold, and exhaust a little bit warm, and there would be lots of dead space.

    Thanks
    Steve

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    4,745
    IF they are pvc/abs and NOT metal, insulation will not be a problem touching them.

    There could be condensation that builds up on the intake, depending on your climate.
    The Food Stamp Program, administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, is proud to be distributing the greatest amount of free meals and stamps EVER.
    Meanwhile, the National Park Service, administered by the U.S. Department of the Interior, asks us to "Please Do Not Feed the Animals". Their stated reason for this policy "... the animals become dependent on handouts and will not learn to take care of themselves."
    from an excerpt by Paul Jacob in Sun City, AZ

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Rochester NY
    Posts
    4,756
    Noise issues?
    Which makes more sense to you?
    CONSERVATION - turning your thermostat back and being uncomfortable. Maybe saving 5-10%
    ENERGY EFFICIENCY - leaving your thermostat where everyone is comfortable. Saving 30-70%

    DO THE NUMBERS! Step on a HOMESCALE.
    What is comfort? Well, it AIN'T just TEMPERATURE!

    Energy Obese? An audit is the next step - go to BPI.org, or RESNET, and find an auditor near you.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    68,591
    Shouldn't be any problem.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Princeton NJ
    Posts
    125
    Thanks. Steve

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Western KY
    Posts
    1,221
    Not an issue.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Rochester NY
    Posts
    4,756
    Quote Originally Posted by tedkidd View Post
    Noise issues?
    Steve, are you having noise issues in your family room?

    I've seen insulation in really crazy places. Great efforts that accomplish no purpose other than making fun wall of shame pictures/stories. If the basement is conditioned, insulation is in the Utility room walls to dampen noise. Placing insulation between two conditioned spaces will not save energy. If its some type of OCD trigger that the walls have it and ceiling doesn't, I get it.

    Just be careful letting an insulation guy know you did that or he may attempt to convince you to insulate your picket fence.
    Which makes more sense to you?
    CONSERVATION - turning your thermostat back and being uncomfortable. Maybe saving 5-10%
    ENERGY EFFICIENCY - leaving your thermostat where everyone is comfortable. Saving 30-70%

    DO THE NUMBERS! Step on a HOMESCALE.
    What is comfort? Well, it AIN'T just TEMPERATURE!

    Energy Obese? An audit is the next step - go to BPI.org, or RESNET, and find an auditor near you.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Princeton NJ
    Posts
    125
    Mr. Tedkidd, hmm. I'm going to have to think about that one. Maybe a bit of OCD.

    What should the temp be in an "unheated" equipment room in winter. The furnace and hot water heaters throw off heat, and 1/3 zones w/uninsulated metal ducts are in the room. But i would think that room should be significantly cooler than the upstairs family room. 60? 55? Last year it seemed about 70, but i wonder if that was transfer from the floor above? Or poorly sealed ducts.




    The equipment room has the furnace, and two water heaters. Two side walls insulated, two side walls block/earth, above is the family room.

    Thanks
    Steve

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Rochester NY
    Posts
    4,756
    It's only likely to be colder if you have a leaky rim joist. Really, you want to clearly understand the homes thermal boundary and focus on that. It should align with your air, and possibly weather boundaries.

    In any event, insulating between a 55f space and a 70f space shouldn't be high on your list of improvements. If you have an energy audit they should give you a prioritized list including energy savings projections and cost estimates.
    Which makes more sense to you?
    CONSERVATION - turning your thermostat back and being uncomfortable. Maybe saving 5-10%
    ENERGY EFFICIENCY - leaving your thermostat where everyone is comfortable. Saving 30-70%

    DO THE NUMBERS! Step on a HOMESCALE.
    What is comfort? Well, it AIN'T just TEMPERATURE!

    Energy Obese? An audit is the next step - go to BPI.org, or RESNET, and find an auditor near you.

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