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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Decatur,IL
    Posts
    5

    Exclamation Just Started School

    I just started taking HVAC/R fast track classes at my local cummunity college. And was wondering if it would be better for me to go for a degree or just certificates. I have My own business atm doing Remodeling/handyman work and am ready to get into something more lucrative. I want to work for someone else not work for myself and I live in central IL.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Kansas City, Kansas, United States
    Posts
    13,817
    experience is more valuable than either!

    do either ona and try to get a job,
    once you have a little experience that will outweigh the school.
    I WILL SELL WORK,GENERATE BUSINESS, GO GET NEW CUSTOMERS!
    YOU SHUT THE HELL UP AND QUIT RUNNING YOUR MOUTH!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    AZ
    Posts
    614
    I wouldn't say experience is MORE valuable. I went to school and then went into the field. A good school will teach you about what things shouldn't be done but are common practice. Also, there are a lot of people in the field that I have worked with that had a lot more experience than me but didn't know a whole lot. A good school will help calibrate your bs meter so you will know when you are working with someone like that.

    A degree will look better on an application. I have heard of people with many years of experience getting turned down because they didn't have any kind of official certificate or degree. The degree looks better and may open more doors.

  4. #4
    A school is not the real world, point blank. An instructor knowing that a wire is completely missing is not real world application. If you're new, something like a Fieldpiece SMAN3 & dual-input thermometer will put you way ahead of the rest.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    AZ
    Posts
    614
    Quote Originally Posted by MechanicallyInclined View Post
    A school is not the real world, point blank. An instructor knowing that a wire is completely missing is not real world application. If you're new, something like a Fieldpiece SMAN3 & dual-input thermometer will put you way ahead of the rest.
    Yes but you still need to learn basic theory, code reqs., how to read wiring diagrams, what "superheat" and "subcooling" mean and how to use them to troubleshoot, etc in order to be a decent tech. Otherwise when your SMAN3 breaks and your boss lets you borrow his analog gauges, you will have to explain that you don't know what to do without your SMAN. And, again, I have heard all kinds of screwy ideas come out of "experienced" mouths. If you train with someone like that and don't have a solid understanding of what's going on, you will end up with the same screwy ideas. I actually had an experienced tech try to tell me that you just feel the suction line to tell when it has enough refrigerant. A solid basic understanding of theory, piping, parts, etc. is indispensable and makes experience much more valuable.

  6. #6
    Do you mean by definition? Or actually explain what the refrigerant is doing in the condenser or evaporator? I recently got the opportunity to check out a guy that was doing the commercial refrigeration while I was doing the AC. This guy had his tools in his pocket, analog gauges and was doing the touchy feely thing.
    My Fluke dual-input thermometer with clamps will work fine along with analog gauges and P/T chart, but why would I resort to that. I got a Digimon for back up. I'm not being bragatocious because the Digimon is not good.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Kansas City, Kansas, United States
    Posts
    13,817
    Wtf is bragatocious????????

    Must have learned that in one of them thare nsw fangle tek skewls!!!

    LOL!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Kansas City, Kansas, United States
    Posts
    13,817
    My point is
    Whichever one you do is fine.
    But if you go through a 9 month program and get an actual job fixing airconditioners .
    That would be better than a degree.
    There are millions of posts on here from guys with a bs degree and can not get a job.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Decatur,IL
    Posts
    5
    well my teacher has had his own business for 30 years that he bought from his dad who had it for 40 yrs. He doesnt go completely by the book. He said he tries to tech more on what your going to need when on the job. And mainly focuses on troubleshooting.And thank you all for the replies!!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    between here and over there
    Posts
    453
    I think field experience is the best degree.. I went to trade school and learn some stuff, when i got into real world situation is where i actually learned something

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    AZ
    Posts
    614
    Don't really know what you are trying to say but obviously you missed the point completely.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Kansas City, Kansas, United States
    Posts
    13,817
    lmao!!!!!!!!!!!


    Quote Originally Posted by dijit View Post
    Don't really know what you are trying to say but obviously you missed the point completely.
    I WILL SELL WORK,GENERATE BUSINESS, GO GET NEW CUSTOMERS!
    YOU SHUT THE HELL UP AND QUIT RUNNING YOUR MOUTH!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    3,068
    Quote Originally Posted by supertek65 View Post
    There are millions of posts on here from guys with a bs degree and can not get a job.
    Is that a Bachelor of Science or a Bull Sh*t degree? I'd say we have both here.
    "There is no greater inequality than the equal treatment of unequals."

    -Thomas Jefferson

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