Page 13 of 13 FirstFirst ... 3678910111213
Results 157 to 168 of 168
  1. #157
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Fayetteville, NC
    Posts
    146
    Post Likes

    micron

    I have read over all the posts but I feel the need to post my two cents.

    A micron gauge is essential for any tech. I went to a scotsman class and a true class on the same day. Both their reps asked for a show of hands of who used a micron gauge. I was amazed to see that only 50 percent of the class raised their hands.

    The first tech I ever rode with had a micron gauge. A supco I believe. I never seen him use it. Needless to say the first time I had to borrow his truck on a weekend call I went to use the gauge. It didn't even have batteries in it.

    After he quit, I put my tools in the truck and hit the road. I ended up going to one of his previous calls on a walkin cooler. System was very, very low on refrigerant. Only about 5psi in the system. I hit it with nitrogen and the whistling noise was apperent. The leak was in the condensor on the top u joint. He didn't even cut away the surrounding steel. He heat it up and threw what looked to be about two sticks of 15 percent on it. I caught hell cutting the steel away and trying to grind down the solder with a cutoff wheel. I did get the leak fixed and haven't heard from them since.

    If he would have used his micron gauge he would have know that the leak wasn't fixed.

    Hell, nitrogen would have told him the same thing.

  2. #158
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Salt Lake City, Utah
    Posts
    34
    Post Likes

    micron gage to CRT coupler

    Quote Originally Posted by stomper56 View Post
    JB D10244 Deep vacuum 1/4 sae swivel coupler
    Just picked up two myself, the rubber gasket is smaller then normal though so it looks like it might have to be babied.
    If using for vacuum i reccomend some Nylog on the gaskets.
    I found this, saw it being used in the true tech tools youtube video. Seems like the perfect adapter for the micron gauge.

    Micron Gauge Coupler by yellow Jacket 69071

    http://www.trutechtools.com/Vacuum-G...er_p_1989.html

  3. #159
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    NW burbs of Detroit
    Posts
    6,058
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by kdb4 View Post
    I found this, saw it being used in the true tech tools youtube video. Seems like the perfect adapter for the micron gauge.

    Micron Gauge Coupler by yellow Jacket 69071

    http://www.trutechtools.com/Vacuum-G...er_p_1989.html
    Heck, that's standard equipment in anybodies vac kit these days.

  4. #160
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Salt Lake City, Utah
    Posts
    34
    Post Likes
    Thanks for the confirmation, I have spent a lot of time reading the forum to figure things out and never ran across this. I bought the full Appion Megaflow kit with the 20 micron rated manifold, the 1/2 inch vacuum hoses, etc. It works great, I'm always down around 350 microns on an evac, but I was always unhappy about how I had to hook up the micron gauge to the CRT service port.

    I had been pulling the schrader out of the CRT service port and using a short 4" rubber hose, it didn't have a valve depressor in it, its all I could come up with. I did have the JB D10244 2" sae swivel adapter but there usually wasn't room to fit it on the CRT and get my micron gauge on it as well, as it didn't bend.

    It would be nice if this was included in the Appion Megaflow kit. True Tech Tools includes it in theirs.

  5. #161
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    NW burbs of Detroit
    Posts
    6,058
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by kdb4 View Post
    Thanks for the confirmation, I have spent a lot of time reading the forum to figure things out and never ran across this. I bought the full Appion Megaflow kit with the 20 micron rated manifold, the 1/2 inch vacuum hoses, etc. It works great, I'm always down around 350 microns on an evac, but I was always unhappy about how I had to hook up the micron gauge to the CRT service port.

    I had been pulling the schrader out of the CRT service port and using a short 4" rubber hose, it didn't have a valve depressor in it, its all I could come up with. I did have the JB D10244 2" sae swivel adapter but there usually wasn't room to fit it on the CRT and get my micron gauge on it as well, as it didn't bend.

    It would be nice if this was included in the Appion Megaflow kit. True Tech Tools includes it in theirs.
    TruTech is a supplier while Appion is a mfg. Trutech puts kits together from different manufacturers ...see why now?

  6. #162
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,449
    Post Likes
    I have system past pressure test but didnt pass vacuum test,and sure not find a very tiny leak!micron gauge is a must have tools!

  7. #163
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    2
    Post Likes
    mpw;1241353
    You can always buy the SMAN360 3 port Digital gauges that have a micron gauge on it I feel like the digitals alone are over priced (But that's me) Also they have sub cooling and super heat clamps which I always test when reading pressures (Some will disagree but to each their own). They are a little pricy but they are worth it in my opinion.Anyway always test Microns when vacuuming. If I don't have one on me. I'll pull the unit for over an hour and a half Granted my Pull-Vac is brand new. Still makes me sketched out not using the proper tools. Also it makes it easier to test for leaks. If they start climbing either your hoses aren't tight or you get to do some searching. Also always make sure your oil is clean and at the right level I can't count how many times I've used someone's vac at work and it was just filthy inside. That's not smart... Its best to take a little longer to fix the problem rather than look non professional and have to come back, Or worse another tech comes and fixes your mistakes.

  8. #164
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Annapolis, MD: ragboat capitol of the world
    Posts
    441
    Post Likes
    I never pull a vacuum on TIME. The micron gage tells me if the vacuum is complete, not my watch.

    You are correct about monitoring the condition and ability of vacuum pumps. A pump that cannot pull below 200 microns is useless and there is only one way to know.

    Too bad we lost posts from late last year regarding vacuum, there were some very good ones.
    Sam

    Know-it-all? Nope, not even half!

  9. Likes DavidDeBord, Jigjoe liked this post
  10. #165
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    2
    Post Likes
    No you're 100% correct about TIME. Especially if you have a low cfm pump. I just mean I didn't have a micron gage at the time. But yeah Now I make sure my microns are low before finishing up.

  11. #166
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    6
    Post Likes
    Always use a micron gauge. I love JBs. It's going to let you know if you have moisture in the system & if it's in a good vac.
    I've met a lot of guys that don't think twice about micron gauges or even bleeding your lines before hooking up to a system with your manifold pressure gauges...Do things the right & recommended way and you'll be better than a lot of new techs out in the field today.

  12. #167
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Hamersville, Ohio
    Posts
    1,890
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by vzenuh View Post
    I have read over all the posts but I feel the need to post my two cents.

    A micron gauge is essential for any tech. I went to a scotsman class and a true class on the same day. Both their reps asked for a show of hands of who used a micron gauge. I was amazed to see that only 50 percent of the class raised their hands.

    The first tech I ever rode with had a micron gauge. A supco I believe. I never seen him use it. Needless to say the first time I had to borrow his truck on a weekend call I went to use the gauge. It didn't even have batteries in it.

    After he quit, I put my tools in the truck and hit the road. I ended up going to one of his previous calls on a walkin cooler. System was very, very low on refrigerant. Only about 5psi in the system. I hit it with nitrogen and the whistling noise was apperent. The leak was in the condensor on the top u joint. He didn't even cut away the surrounding steel. He heat it up and threw what looked to be about two sticks of 15 percent on it. I caught hell cutting the steel away and trying to grind down the solder with a cutoff wheel. I did get the leak fixed and haven't heard from them since.

    If he would have used his micron gauge he would have know that the leak wasn't fixed.

    Hell, nitrogen would have told him the same thing.
    A leak of that kind wasn't evident by reading the gauges?

  13. #168
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Annapolis, MD: ragboat capitol of the world
    Posts
    441
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by DirtyHamilton View Post
    Always use a micron gauge. I love JBs. It's going to let you know if you have moisture in the system & if it's in a good vac.
    I've met a lot of guys that don't think twice about micron gauges or even bleeding your lines before hooking up to a system with your manifold pressure gauges...Do things the right & recommended way and you'll be better than a lot of new techs out in the field today.
    For me, the JB DV-40 had too much buffering. I had become accustom to the wiggling needle of a Hastings/JB gage years ago indicating a tiny leak. The DV-40 just as too much buffering and doesn't give the same indication. On the other hand, the Bluvac has the exact right amount of buffering and shows a micro leak the same way with an unstable digital output. The Bluvac also gives a pretty good moisture indication - and their top of the line tool even directly shows dehydration on your phone.
    Sam

    Know-it-all? Nope, not even half!

Page 13 of 13 FirstFirst ... 3678910111213

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor MagazineThe place where Electrical professionals meet.