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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    2
    I am in the process of purchasing a home with radiant floor heating. I live in Alaska, and there is something about sitting by a crackling fire while watching the snow fall. Therefore I want to add a wood-burning fireplace. Natural gas is not available, propane is relatively expensive, while firewood is abundantly available and cheap (often free). The fireplace is for ambiance, not as a heat source.

    I am considering the purchase of a Heatilator wood-burning fireplace but would like to hear input regarding other options.

    I am also wondering if the fireplace can be installed over the top of the existing flooring. Since the tubing for the radiant floor heat will run under the fireplace, I am interested to know if I need to have the contractor tear up the floor and remove a section of the tubing to complete the installation.

    I understand that adding a fireplace will cause a spike of heat the will cause cooling in other parts of the zone. However I only plan to light the fire on an infrequent basis and only for a few hours at a time. Therefore I’m willing to accept the fact that some parts of the house might grow a bit cool.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Pacific Coast of Canada
    Posts
    4,008
    Shouldn't be a big deal.
    Personally, I wouldn't touch the pipes in the floor.
    Use construction adhesive for the framing on the floor to avoid driving a nail through a pipe. Then, tie the whole structure to a wall.
    Trust me, I know what I'm doing.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Powell River, BC, Canada
    Posts
    763
    Are you talking about a built-in type fireplace, or a freestanding stove? The built-in type may need to have the flooring protected by a non-combustable material, or be raised off the floor. The freestanding types are a little more versitile as to installation. Do you have an existing chimny certified for wood, or is it to be installed with the unit? If they are available in your area, have a look at the Regency line. Excellent quality and efficiency, and very nice looking units.
    Where are you? Are you done yet? I got ONE more call for you.....

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    manitowoc wisconsin
    Posts
    4,943
    I think that is a good question.Will the radiant heat from the fireplace excede the temperature rating of the pex?It might pay to install a radiant barrier over that section just to be on the safe side.But I doubt it if you are doing a masonry built up.The maximum temperature rating of the tubing should be stamped right on it read the numbers off the tubing.
    Take your time & do it right!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    2
    Collin:

    I agree about not touching the pipes in the floor as I was concerned about leaks. I am also planning to install in a corner tied to both walls so using construction adhesive on the floor should work.

    gasguy:

    I'm planning a built-in fireplace raised off the floor. The chimney will be a new installation so I will make sure it's certified for wood. Thank you for the tip on the Regency line. I went to their website and it looks like they carry a very nice product line. I don't believe they are available in my area but I am willing to purchase outside Alaska and ship.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Pacific Coast of Canada
    Posts
    4,008
    If the OP is considering a Heatilator factory built fireplace, they are designed to be installed on plywood so heat is not an issue. The hearth must be non-combustible though.
    Trust me, I know what I'm doing.

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