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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Mobile, Alabama, United States
    Posts
    282

    1 vs. 2 pole contactors

    I have always replaced the contactor with the same thing that was already in the unit. If it was a single pole, put a single pole back. But the other day I was told that I could just use a double pole for for all replacements. Is there any problems with doing this? It would be nice to cut down on one some stock that we have to carry! Every little bit helps.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Winter Haven, FL
    Posts
    4,379
    Carriers would use a single pole contactor to bleed a small amount of current through the start winding, as a crankcase heater. This does about nothing. Manufacturers use a single pole because its cheaper. Nothing wrong with going to 2 pole.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Toronto ON
    Posts
    422
    Quote Originally Posted by kuntrybumm View Post
    I have always replaced the contactor with the same thing that was already in the unit. If it was a single pole, put a single pole back. But the other day I was told that I could just use a double pole for for all replacements. Is there any problems with doing this? It would be nice to cut down on one some stock that we have to carry! Every little bit helps.
    There's no problem with doing this, other than the fact that you are using a more expensive contactor for no reason at all... Would it work the other way around I wonder?? hmmm...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Pontotoc, MS
    Posts
    83
    My understanding is that the one leg is sometimes used as for compressor heat. I replace with like part.

    Sent from my C771 using Tapatalk 2

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    St. Louis
    Posts
    3,415
    I've only carried two pole for space reasons. Just wire them the same as a one pole and leave the unbroken leg unbroken. Simple.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    McAllen, TX
    Posts
    17
    I always try to stick to replacing with same component as design, but this one does not worry me much. The claim that is made is that it works as a crankcase heater since one leg to the compressor is always hot. Most techs put any contactor. I think the issue is when a day has a large OA temperature swing where liquid refrigerant would migrate to the compressor and cause damage on startup. This is suppose to help with that.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    2,663
    Goodman puts single poles on all there builders units doesn't seem to make a difference in the long run I think there just cheaper.
    My name is TooCoolforschool and I am a chronic over charger.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Central WA
    Posts
    1,533
    I carry only a few contactors for space reasons: 2 pole 40 amp (50A res) in a 24v coil, and 3 pole 40 amp in 24v and 208-230. I've got one of the new sure switches, too, but no takers so far (except for my house). Those cover about 90% or more of what I am working on.

    I also don't carry dual run or 370 volt capacitors. I can build any cap combination I need, and 440v has me covered.

    As said in regards to the contactor - if trickle heat or something is a problem then wire past one set of points and leave it hot, but that is pretty rare.

  9. #9
    Exactly what I do.
    Quote Originally Posted by cjpwalker View Post
    I carry only a few contactors for space reasons: 2 pole 40 amp (50A res) in a 24v coil, and 3 pole 40 amp in 24v and 208-230. I've got one of the new sure switches, too, but no takers so far (except for my house). Those cover about 90% or more of what I am working on.

    I also don't carry dual run or 370 volt capacitors. I can build any cap combination I need, and 440v has me covered.

    As said in regards to the contactor - if trickle heat or something is a problem then wire past one set of points and leave it hot, but that is pretty rare.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Warsaw Mo.
    Posts
    228
    Quote Originally Posted by cjpwalker View Post
    I carry only a few contactors for space reasons: 2 pole 40 amp (50A res) in a 24v coil, and 3 pole 40 amp in 24v and 208-230. I've got one of the new sure switches, too, but no takers so far (except for my house). Those cover about 90% or more of what I am working on.

    I also don't carry dual run or 370 volt capacitors. I can build any cap combination I need, and 440v has me covered.

    As said in regards to the contactor - if trickle heat or something is a problem then wire past one set of points and leave it hot, but that is pretty rare.

    +1

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    4,665
    I have heard about the trickle heater although if you put a amp clamp they are not drawing current when off. Also its better to have a 2 pole contactor and need a 1 pole than to have a 1 pole and need a 2 pole
    We really need change now

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    3,219
    I haven't stocked a single pole contactor on my truck in over 25 years. Absolutely no reason to do so. There are not many units who use the trickle voltage instead of a crankcase heater and as mentioned earlier, you can always jump one side if you need to. It's like carrying 370 and 440 volt caps of the same mfd rating.
    Gary
    -----------
    http://www.oceanhvac.com
    An engineer designs what he would never work on.
    A technician works on what he would never design.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    360
    You could always just run a wire from Line to Load on one leg and make it single pole. I carry only double pole contactors on my truck.

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