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Thread: EPA Dilemma

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
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    160

    Confused EPA Dilemma

    We are experiencing issues with Allowing any Coil Cleaner to get to Storm Drains--Has anyone else ran in to this and what was your solution--Coils must be Cleaned--Thank you for any Assistance you can Provide.

  2. #2
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    Apr 2012
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    Louisiana
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    What issues, who is imposing this? The customer, city, state, fed. Is it any coil cleaner or just specific ones? Post title implies EPA what are the regulation requirements?

    Edit: I see you said "any". Still need some more info.

  3. #3
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    Sep 2005
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    Atlanta GA area
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    I would be interested to know SPECIFIC EPA regs on this...

    Sounds like a local govt blow-hard blowing smoke to shake down (try to shake down) contractors.
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Quality work at a fair price with excellent customer service!

    Romans Ch's 5-6-7-8

    2 Chronicles 7:14

  4. #4
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    Keokuk, IA
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    Normally, its' the state DNR that is the first layer and enforces based on local issues and needs. The EPA and DOJ doesn't get invovled until a major violator gets involved... ie until they can squeeze out some really big fines.

    Hoenstly, unless an approved substance, just abotu antything other than clean water that's the same temeprature as the local body of water is discharges into, is pretty much disallowed unless specifically allowed on a permit.


    Remember, 99% of environmental regulations is all in the paperwork. If its' permitted, you're OK. IF it exceeds your permit or isn't lsited on an aprpoved list, you mgith as well be dumping toxic nuclear waste into a pond next to a daycare. THere's no inbetween. You either OK, or your a "polluter" or toxic waste. But, if you have a permit that lets you discharge 1000lbs of heay metal into a river each day, then you're fine. The guy next door can dsicharge... or rather "Dump" 50lbs and get fined $1MM dollars becuse he's not permitted.

    How does it go... "In God we Trust, all others better have a permit".

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by motoguy128 View Post
    Normally, its' the state DNR that is the first layer and enforces based on local issues and needs. The EPA and DOJ doesn't get invovled until a major violator gets involved... ie until they can squeeze out some really big fines.

    Hoenstly, unless an approved substance, just abotu antything other than clean water that's the same temeprature as the local body of water is discharges into, is pretty much disallowed unless specifically allowed on a permit.


    Remember, 99% of environmental regulations is all in the paperwork. If its' permitted, you're OK. IF it exceeds your permit or isn't lsited on an aprpoved list, you mgith as well be dumping toxic nuclear waste into a pond next to a daycare. THere's no inbetween. You either OK, or your a "polluter" or toxic waste. But, if you have a permit that lets you discharge 1000lbs of heay metal into a river each day, then you're fine. The guy next door can dsicharge... or rather "Dump" 50lbs and get fined $1MM dollars becuse he's not permitted.

    How does it go... "In God we Trust, all others better have a permit".
    Yeah, and what is amazing is: The permit becomes... by default... the norm rather than the facts. This is what happens when govt gets too big... reality suffers. And folks wonder why folks dislike the govt. The little good done... is seriously overshadowed by the mess created.
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Quality work at a fair price with excellent customer service!

    Romans Ch's 5-6-7-8

    2 Chronicles 7:14

  6. #6
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    Western KY
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    Wash it with water and there you go. I'll be back tomorrow and do it agin for ya.

  7. #7
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    Jun 2012
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    We have a few highly environmentally concerned customers. Their chillers are in containment pits and if we clean them with our normal cleaners we have to use a sucker truck which they provide. When they cleaned them they used dishwasher detergent and it did a great job and their environmental person said it was ok to dilute and drain. Might be an option for you.

  8. #8
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    May 2002
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    evansville indiana
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    Quote Originally Posted by Freightshaker View Post
    We have a few highly environmentally concerned customers. Their chillers are in containment pits and if we clean them with our normal cleaners we have to use a sucker truck which they provide. When they cleaned them they used dishwasher detergent and it did a great job and their environmental person said it was ok to dilute and drain. Might be an option for you.
    10-4
    That's one a particular customer did , put all their air cooled chillers in pits, not deep ,ground level with a 6" curb around it . We wash ,they suck up with a sucker truck ,they take it to their waste water plant .

    Not cheap but what they had to do..
    Last edited by mikeacman; 09-06-2012 at 03:18 PM.
    mikeacman

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    evansville indiana
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    I have solved your dilemma

    Sell them all new equipment with micro channel coils

    You aren't supposed to use coil cleaner on those anyway.

    They get new stuff

    Upgraded to new refrigerant

    Win win for everybody

    Sorry to be a smartass

    I had one customer that told me to wash his stuff on weekends because the environmental personell would never be there ,on a weekend

    You have a challenge that I have faced and it sucks .
    mikeacman

  10. #10
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    Apr 2012
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    Louisiana
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    Shouldn't have to use coil cleaner very often anyway unless there's cooking involved then use triple d or dishwashing detergent as mentioned before. If you find a coil water cannot clean, rent a steam pressure washer and bill it out. Coil cleaner is way overused IMO.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
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    Tampa Florida
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    776
    The county EPA showed up at the shop one day, she poked around and found some coil cleaner. She asked how I used it, I told her by the directions. Never saw her again.

    The EPA isn't bad, try dealing with the FDA

  12. #12
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    Jul 2012
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    Western KY
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sicofthis View Post
    Shouldn't have to use coil cleaner very often anyway unless there's cooking involved then use triple d or dishwashing detergent as mentioned before. If you find a coil water cannot clean, rent a steam pressure washer and bill it out. Coil cleaner is way overused IMO.
    True for the most part. Some environments are bad and may need chemical, laundry services, hatcheries, paint shops etc. but I agree coil cleaner is regularly used where it is not really needed. Decent water pressure and lots of volume will usually get er done.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    New York City
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    106
    Things to check:
    1. Can your chemical go down the local sanitary sewer?
    2. Are storm and sanitary combined (like nyc)?If 1&2 are yes then you're done.
    3. If not then maybe you use containment and a portable sump to get to the sewer. This is if 1 is true
    4. If 1&3 don't do it for you don't use chemicals unless they are permitted to storm. Or you can truck it out. Liability extends hundreds of yearor chemical pollution of the ground and ground water.

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