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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lexington, NC
    Posts
    5,122

    Lockformer Flanger

    I bought a flanger that evidently isn't set up right. i am adjusting the top roller so that the lip will be deeper, as it was only 1/8" deep when I got it. I am adjusting the top wheel out away from the sholder that is turned on the bottom roller to make the lip that it forms larger. Does anyone know: Am I doing this correctly (Lockformer Manual doesn't say how to adjust for a larger/smaller flang)--Also, what is the lip supposed to measure in order to properly be marked with one of those marking tools (that I don't have one of) and to properly work with a Pittsburgh seam.
    Thanks
    The main thing is to keep the main thing the main thing!

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    N.E. Ohio
    Posts
    88
    If you are talking about the Easy-Edger, the flange is determined by where you start your metal in. It should be 1/4 to 5/16" depending on the pocket your machine forms. Dad taught me to start the turn on the leading end with a pair of pliers or hand seamer the first inch or so. Makes starting easier. Hope this helps. Not hard, but takes practice. John

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Delaware
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    3,823
    Call N.B. Handy
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lexington, NC
    Posts
    5,122
    Quote Originally Posted by tinnerjohn View Post
    If you are talking about the Easy-Edger, the flange is determined by where you start your metal in. It should be 1/4 to 5/16" depending on the pocket your machine forms. Dad taught me to start the turn on the leading end with a pair of pliers or hand seamer the first inch or so. Makes starting easier. Hope this helps. Not hard, but takes practice. John
    Well that is what I recalled. We had one that we used at tech school, and I recall that it took a little time and skill to properly feed the rollers. We also had to mark the sheet metal so that we would know where to feed it in.
    However, on this flanger, the bottom roller has a shoulder turned on it on the side opposite of the angled table. When the metal is fed in, it goes to that shoulder, which acts like a stop, and the lip comes out to that size. As long as the metal is fed in to that shoulder on the roller, the lip stays uniform in size. It is a nice feature, but I don't think that this is the right size roller. I would think that the V's on the rollers would line up dead center, or at least close, but to achieve a 1/4" lip I am going to have to offset the top roller futher away from the shoulder on the bottom roller.
    It just seems odd how this is made.
    The main thing is to keep the main thing the main thing!

    If "the grass is greener on the other side", it likely has been fertilized with Bull$hit!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Caledonia WI
    Posts
    877
    Easy-Edger is for making 3/16" flanges. Good luck trying to make a 1/4" flange.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lexington, NC
    Posts
    5,122
    Quote Originally Posted by billg View Post
    Easy-Edger is for making 3/16" flanges. Good luck trying to make a 1/4" flange.
    It doesn't have anything to do with LUCK. Mine will do 1/4 to 5/16. I used it the other day to roll a lip on a rain cap I made. I think I could go up to 3/8 if needed.
    The main thing is to keep the main thing the main thing!

    If "the grass is greener on the other side", it likely has been fertilized with Bull$hit!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    South of Heaven
    Posts
    1,090
    I would use the outer edge of the roller as my guide and the " lip " ( or step on the roller ) would be below the metal. This gave me a 1/4 single flange every time. We also had a 1/4 inch notch cut on the 45 degree plate that sticks out to the left of the machine. We would use this to start the end of the bend on most fittings.

    My shop foreman used to say " whoever named this thing " easy edger " never had to freaking use it " , lol. When I learned to turn double seams and elbow edge locks I understood why for sure.

  8. #8
    Our lock former does not make a full 15/16 (7/8) flange on the pits seam. Any suggestion?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lexington, NC
    Posts
    5,122
    Quote Originally Posted by hvac5646 View Post
    Our lock former does not make a full 15/16 (7/8) flange on the pits seam. Any suggestion?
    Probably can only be two things: either the rollers are worn or altered (severely), or the guides that you push the metal against are sitting to far forward. I assume the shortage would be on the lip with the above. I would check the quid position first.

    Also, I mark my sheetmetal 1" for the pittsburg machine, as this is how much metal it takes to bend it.
    The main thing is to keep the main thing the main thing!

    If "the grass is greener on the other side", it likely has been fertilized with Bull$hit!

  10. #10
    thx

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