Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 27 to 35 of 35
  1. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Omaha NE
    Posts
    109
    Quote Originally Posted by hurtinhvac View Post
    That's a major challenge when you are new - knowing how the jobs flow to stay busy.

    This is very true. My boss, tells me " I can't afford to have you standing around today". We are installing 3 rooftop ac's by way of a crane. At the time I was waiting for a semi to pass, so I could get a tool for one of the senior techs. The boss tells me something to do, but says "don't do it right now", then runs off to the roof, leaving me standing there...not knowing what to do at that moment ?!

    There should be more threads for new people on what various jobs entail...ie simple ac change outs, furnace change outs, complete systems, heat pumps, attic air handlers etc. What usually has to happen first down to cutting power, gas, recovering, tearing out the coil etc and in general what order it all should happen depending on what you are doing. Getting the lines brazed in first so you can have more pump time or while you go to lunch.

    I am still a bit peeved to this day that I was left floundering despite repeatedly asking what can I do to help. It's one of the most horsesh!t things you can do to somebody who is truly there to work and learn.
    This is also very true. My boss pulls me aside after 3 weeks on the job (knowing this is my first hvac industry job) and says "you've got to start picking up the pace and start learning all the parts and equipment we use". I say, " I think I am learning, but I know I have a lot to learn" I know these guys have to get the job done, homeowners need their a/c and furnaces up and running in a timely fashion. Sometimes, when I slow down a senior tech to show me something, I feel like I am interfering with the job at hand, getting that a/c and furnace up and running.

  2. #28
    I'm new also to the game i had a truck after about 2 weeks i have to go and install the coil and condesener on my own i have the jourmany come with me at the start of the day he makes sure what i need to do is this correct way to learn?

    I have noticed i have got way better but i did burn some wood week ago oops and we use hard pipe which takes ages, but u get better and guess what u can fix leaks if there leaking

  3. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    nampa idaho
    Posts
    66
    i have seen some videos of the yj on youtube that should help you out, its a pretty simple procedure once you know how to measure and line everything up, but definately find some old scrap and practice

  4. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Gainesville, FL
    Posts
    325
    Quote Originally Posted by Britabroad View Post

    I have noticed i have got way better but i did burn some wood week ago oops and we use hard pipe which takes ages, but u get better and guess what u can fix leaks if there leaking
    Use your heat shields if you're brazing against wood. Hard pipe looks 100x better on exposed work, and it bends with the right tools. I can't think of a better way to increase the professionalism of your copper work than switching to hard drawn copper. And it is generally less expensive.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

  5. #31
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Near Chicago, IL
    Posts
    3,317
    Quote Originally Posted by drkglass01 View Post
    My question has to do with bending copper tubing (using a yellow jacket tubing bender). I was given the task of bending a 7/8" suction line on Friday and, well, it didn't go as well as I planned. I ended up getting a kink in the line, and having to have my experienced partner bail me out Does anyone here have any suggestions, links or wisdom on the fine art of copper tubing bending ? I really am getting tired of having to get bailed out all the time.
    I have found 7/8 and 1 1/8" soft copper to be more of an oval shape than round, and this leads to problems when you try to bend it. Heck, I have never brazed 1 1/8" fittings without rounding the tubing first with adjustable pliers.

    A prior post mentions to try and keep the bend in the same direction as the tube comes off the roll, and this is true. Doesn't matter if you are using a bender (lever, ratchet or spring) or unwinding it from the roll.

    Given enough distance, you can spin the roll as it is unwound.

    Lubricating the bender shoes helps.

    Sometimes, the kinked line isn't avoidable when trying to bend tubing that isn't round in a bender- especially when you are stuck having to bend it opposite the way it came off the roll. I prefer to unroll it, twist it along the tubing axis as needed and deal with the longer radius bends. A soft copper job can look pretty good with a little bit of effort.

    Yes, tight fitting 90 degree bends looks better, but it adds lots of joints if you are using fittings, and those extra joints may not be needed.

  6. #32
    meh rookie, as far as your torches, you'll get the hang of it.. I don't monkey with benders I have my fittings, I have worked with guys that dick with benders but I dont have the time. You need to read or ask other tech's what their manifolds are set to. You will look like you really want to learn and understand things by asking what your teacher's oxygen and accetelyn manifold is set too. Without having proper manifold setting you will be burning cutting and making floating nats or flies in client's homes...

    Good luck and don't give up..

    oh and as a old timer get rid of the bender...

  7. #33
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Near Chicago, IL
    Posts
    3,317
    Quote Originally Posted by Danae12 View Post
    oh and as a old timer get rid of the bender...

    Why?

  8. #34
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Fayetteville, NC
    Posts
    130
    I worked with a gentlemen for about six months. He was always willing to bust his butt and I had no problem working with him. Even when he made a mistake I wouldn't flip out. I would how him show easy it was to correct that mistake and to learn from it.

    A kink isn't the end of the world. Senior techs may make it seem like the world has ended and rib ya for it, but it has happened to them too. Just learn from it and know to to repair it in a timely manner.

    As for your torch skills, if your using a B tank just give it heat. Play around with oxyacetylene. I love it and have never looked back. Its alot hotter and if your not careful you can and will burn a hole in copper with it. MAPP works well too for smaller size copper, in my opinion 7/8 is the max and for that you will be putting that torch there for longer than you would have with your b tank or oxyacetylene. You will be surprised what you can do with it.

    I sure hope your senior techs are showing you what happens when you braze and dont bubble nitrogen through the lines.
    Last edited by vzenuh; 09-07-2012 at 08:13 PM. Reason: typo

  9. #35
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    324
    Hmm, I used to hate brazing and running copper when I was a nube but now it is my favorite part of the job. Clean and sanded joints for starters. I picked up one of the small rosebud tips for my oxy/act torch which allows you to get the flame right up on what you are brazing without burning a hole in it. When beginning to braze a joint, I always place the flame on the hardest to reach spot first and then draw the solder to it and walk the flame back around towards the easiest spot to reach, bringing the solder around with it till the joint's complete. With sizes of 1/4 up to 3/4, I leave the solder stick in one spot and use the flame to run my solder around. When heated right its just as easy as soft soldering water pipe and stuff. The bigger pipe sizes you just work your way around the fitting.

    I dont think I ever owned a pipe bender except for in trade school when I was told to buy one for class....lol. I bend by hand, using my knee, steel toe or what ever is available and when that doesnt work I use fittings. As long as your brazing skills are up to snuff, a few fittings isnt an issue.

    I also religiously wrap anything I dont want to get cooked with a wet rag. Nothing like a fried valve to make your day go better. Also when doing your suction line, leave one fitting unsoldered preferably on a strait run and add your armaflex so it doesnt have a dozen zip ties or tape joints to hold it together. Push it back and use your tubing cutter to hold it in place away from the last joint you're brazing then when you are done and you have cooled it down, release the cutter and your flex will look top notch. Wrap a wet rag around the copper where your cutter is holding the armaflex back if needed to keep from cooking the flex to crispy smokey nuggets.
    l8r

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event