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  1. #1

    Heat-N-Glo 8000TRD or 6000CLX

    I have a model 8000TRD original with the house estimate 13 years old. I have been here 8 years and never had the unit maintained as I hardly used it. With recent years of power outages becoming common I have been thinking of upgrading? Is the model 6000 CLX a significant upgrade? After viewing the site I am wondering if my issues with the 8000 (low flame and heat) is due to poor maintenance and not because it is an inferior unit compared to the 6000 CLX. If the 8000 TRD is operating properly how would it compare to the model 6000? I'm trying to judge if the change is appropriate? Thanks for any comments.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    S.E. Pa
    Posts
    6,293
    Any gas appliance should have an annual inspection by a qualified professional and maintenance as required. The inspection determines the level of maintenance. On any new installs or first time service, you will want a comprehensive inspection to ensure it was installed in accordance with the mfrs. listed instructions. If you cannot pass that test, no need to go any further. If installed properly, then is it operating within the mfrs. spec.s? Again, if not, fix it before moving on. Now, if it passes both those tests and you're still not satisfied with the heating performance, aesthetics, or whatever, then sure, if money is no object, knock yourself out. Just be realistic in your expectations. It is a zone heater. It provides supplemental heat. It is not a primary heat source. Sure, most are now heater rated but that does not guarantee performance. The old 8000 TRD was a big, basic direct vent that burned a little more gas than a 36" box but was not a very good fireplace. It was too little in too big of a box. The LP versions were notorious for sooting due to a lot of issues but too much secondary air cooling the flames was a problem you just couldn't fix legally.

    If you're serious about swapping out units, consider the logistics and fixed details first, then consider what new box last. Check for homeowner assn. rules, homeowners insurance, local ordinances, energy agency regs., permits, who is licensed AND qualified to do this work? How will you weatherize the chase, which you can bet is not done properly? Trim options, wiring, etc. Have the gas piping inspected and tested for adequacy before committing to spending all that money. Undersized, pinched, or obstructed gas lines are expensive problems.

    When you say 'low flame' have you turned the flame height adjustment knob all the way up? Do you have the manual? It's a little black or silver knob on the gas valve. There should be metal tags inside with pics of the valve and step by step instructions in operating it. BTW, check the metal tag on that unit. An 8TRD is probably a lot older. If you find the serial number and there are four digits after it, those are the week and year of construction.
    HTH

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by hearthman View Post
    Any gas appliance should have an annual inspection by a qualified professional and maintenance as required. The inspection determines the level of maintenance. On any new installs or first time service, you will want a comprehensive inspection to ensure it was installed in accordance with the mfrs. listed instructions. If you cannot pass that test, no need to go any further. If installed properly, then is it operating within the mfrs. spec.s? Again, if not, fix it before moving on. Now, if it passes both those tests and you're still not satisfied with the heating performance, aesthetics, or whatever, then sure, if money is no object, knock yourself out. Just be realistic in your expectations. It is a zone heater. It provides supplemental heat. It is not a primary heat source. Sure, most are now heater rated but that does not guarantee performance. The old 8000 TRD was a big, basic direct vent that burned a little more gas than a 36" box but was not a very good fireplace. It was too little in too big of a box. The LP versions were notorious for sooting due to a lot of issues but too much secondary air cooling the flames was a problem you just couldn't fix legally.

    If you're serious about swapping out units, consider the logistics and fixed details first, then consider what new box last. Check for homeowner assn. rules, homeowners insurance, local ordinances, energy agency regs., permits, who is licensed AND qualified to do this work? How will you weatherize the chase, which you can bet is not done properly? Trim options, wiring, etc. Have the gas piping inspected and tested for adequacy before committing to spending all that money. Undersized, pinched, or obstructed gas lines are expensive problems.

    When you say 'low flame' have you turned the flame height adjustment knob all the way up? Do you have the manual? It's a little black or silver knob on the gas valve. There should be metal tags inside with pics of the valve and step by step instructions in operating it. BTW, check the metal tag on that unit. An 8TRD is probably a lot older. If you find the serial number and there are four digits after it, those are the week and year of construction.
    HTH
    Hearthman - Very appreciative of your response and to answer your questions I do have a manual and have tried adjusting the flame and while it does vary with the turning of the knob the flame barely climbs to about 3/4 the height of the log and yes being an LP unit the glass front gets hazy to say the least. I do realize that these devices are basically a joke to even be called a fireplace but this is what I have to work with. I'd like your comments on the 6000 CLX or another device that would help take the edge off during a power outage. Also as a reference my serial number is 1442. Thanks again for any expert opinion you care to offer.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    S.E. Pa
    Posts
    6,293
    You can't tell with LP by the visual flame change. You'll need a manometer to see if the manifold pressure is changing and is it set to 10.0 wci on high. It isn't just LP that clouds the glass--it happens to ALL gas fireplaces. You can use special glass cleaners from the hearth industry such as White-Off or you can use household metal polishes, Brasso or Noxon then clean streaks with a non-ammonia based glass cleaner and always on cool glass only. If this glass has the red rubber gasket, it needs to be replaced with one that has a rope gasket and metal frame around the perimeter. There's a soft recall on that original glass.

    The burn you get from touching the glass won't be a joke if you touch it. I'm sorry but I don't concur with your characterization of them as a joke. They beat an open hearth wood burning fireplace in safety, ease of use, ease of homeowner maintenance, and carry a warranty from a major mfr. versus a brick "chimmley" built by Bubba who's daddy taught him how to sling mud with a trowel. A "real" open hearth fireplace is a dinosaur that really has no place in conditioned buildings of today.

  5. #5
    Thanks again Hearthman as I do appreciate your time and would like to get your opinion on what gas fireplace you would suggest or would prefer to have instead of the 8000 TRD in your house. Based on your earlier comments it seemed obvious that the 8000 would not be your first choice. I suspect your day is busy and your comments here are an extra effort so your opinion and suggestions are greatly appreciated. Thanks again.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    206
    There are few possible reasons for the low heat output. First it could be low gas pressure, although I doubt it's the problem. Second it could be it's getting too much air, and the air needs to be adjusted. Third and most likely, this unit may have never been designed to heat.
    I can't remember off the top of my head, but H-n-G has made some fireplaces that are for aesthetics only, and will say so in the manual, and also on the metal plate underneath. I thought the TRD was a unit built to provide supplement heat, but could be wrong.
    Basically if it's a aesthetics only fireplace they won't give you much heat and there is nothing that can be done, other than replace unit with something else(very expensive).
    If it was designed for supplement heat then it may be just a adjustment need and would call a local dealer.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Fresno, CA
    Posts
    226
    Hearthman just curious if you had a choice and was given a free insert/Freestanding gas NG in the 40,000 BTU range what manufacuers product would pick out of the following: Enviro, Heat N Glo/Quadra fire, Country/Lennox or Travis. I understand you sit on some committees and you may not be able to answer but was curious. As far as the OP everything HM has explained. One thing that really makes me upset is when I enter into a service call and find the customers has been sold a small decorative unit or low end but unit with the promise that "It'll heat your whole house." Happens at least 5-8 times a year, one thing I like about HeatnGlo is the add on GFK 160A kits, most of my customers are happy with the operation.

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