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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Upstate, SC
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    38

    How would rubbing alcohol help a r-12 system?

    Back when I first got my R-12 Cert. in the early '90's I remember seeing this additive called "Maxi-cool" in auto parts stores. I tried it and it seemed to make the air cond. cool better and it did lower the outlet air temp in cars with the old r-12 system. I have no idea what the stuff was, but it smelled just like rubbing alcohol, and it would catch fire with an open flame. Anybody know what this stuff really was? or how it worked? Was it just me wanting it to work, or did it do something?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Upstate SC
    Posts
    1,439
    Probably had something to do with moisture. I'm speaking out of my rear but maybe it would bind with the non condensables and help them to get trapped in the drier. There are similar products still sold by the company that makes super seal.

    Sent from my ERIS using Tapatalk 2

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    39
    I think it was just methanol. It was used to prevent any moisture in a system from forming ice and causing irregular flow out of the metering device.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    NW burbs of Detroit
    Posts
    6,058
    Yep. Was also known as Thawzone.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Upstate, SC
    Posts
    38
    It has to do more than just moisture control doesn't it. I always have pulled a good vacuum, I always change the dryer when I open a system, and I'm always careful with my manafold hoses. So where could the moisture have come from? Maybe just what was in the virgin refrigerant? And I've saw it drop the outlet air temp down to 30 degrees on a Olds Cutlass. GM low pressure switch should have cut the compressor before getting that cold.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Toronto Canada
    Posts
    1,090
    Quote Originally Posted by RLBisTCB View Post
    It has to do more than just moisture control doesn't it. I always have pulled a good vacuum, I always change the dryer when I open a system, and I'm always careful with my manafold hoses. So where could the moisture have come from? Maybe just what was in the virgin refrigerant? And I've saw it drop the outlet air temp down to 30 degrees on a Olds Cutlass. GM low pressure switch should have cut the compressor before getting that cold.
    Sounds like Magic.
    The new stuff they sell to people at partstores now as R134A is Propane. It will also catch fire with open flame.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Upstate, SC
    Posts
    38
    Makes me glad I don't work with 134a much! I'd hate to have a leak that I haden't found yet, light a cigarette, and blow my head off! I know they will kill you but I didn't think it would be that quick, or that messy!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    NW burbs of Detroit
    Posts
    6,058
    Quote Originally Posted by OldSchoolMech View Post
    Sounds like Magic.
    The new stuff they sell to people at partstores now as R134A is Propane. It will also catch fire with open flame.
    That sounds fishy to me.

    Where did you get that from?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    39
    Quote Originally Posted by hvaclover View Post
    That sounds fishy to me.

    Where did you get that from?

    He must be referring to the counterfeit R134a from China, which consists of R22, R142b and R40.

    When this gas (the R40 component, methyl chloride) comes into contact with aluminium, it forms a reaction which creates toxic and highly flammable substances (namely trimethylaluminium) which will spontaneously combust in contact with air. The reaction also degrades the aluminium components and contaminates the oil, so the system would likely fail in a relatively short time as well.

    Best to avoid really cheap R134a in disposable cylinders.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,867
    There are many R-22 retrofit refrigerants being marketed for R-22 that are, basically, propane.

    If I recall correctly, there were, and are, also hydrocarbon based R-12/134a replacements as well.

    R-134a isn't flammable in and of itself, but, if mixed with one of these magical retrofit gasses, it would likely become so.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    39
    Quote Originally Posted by jpsmith1cm View Post
    There are many R-22 retrofit refrigerants being marketed for R-22 that are, basically, propane.

    If I recall correctly, there were, and are, also hydrocarbon based R-12/134a replacements as well.

    R-134a isn't flammable in and of itself, but, if mixed with one of these magical retrofit gasses, it would likely become so.
    That's interesting, as I didn't know that about the new R22 replacements. They are not available here at the moment.

    I thought he meant R134a from a parts house that was sold as R134a but wasn't really R134a. I am familiar with R290 as it is becoming more common in imported equipment from the EU.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    ms
    Posts
    122
    i think r22a is a flammable r22 replacement

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    383
    R134a mixed with compressed air can cause combustion.

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