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  1. #1

    Icemaking and Refrigeration Book

    Unfortunately in my current position I will never get hands on experience with any ice machines or freezers (and I am REALLY wanting to get into this area of the trade). Do any of you have any recommendations on books, guides etc? Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    116
    Manitowoc factory school, probably one of the best ways to learn icemaking

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Chicagoland Area
    Posts
    4,750
    Nothing like hands on. I've taken Manitowocs 1/2 day and full day courses, Hoshi classes and Iceomatic classes. Working on most ice machines is repetitive. Certain models share certain problems. The number one problem you will experience with ice machines is water issues. As far as freezers. The only major difference between a freezer and a cooler is the addition of a heater and a timeclock.
    Officially, Down for the count

    YOU HAVE TO GET OFF YOUR ASS TO GET ON YOUR FEET

    I know enough to know, I don't know enough
    Liberalism-Ideas so good they mandate them

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    4,381
    The most common issue i find with ice machines is lack of maintenance. Of course other problems arise but the last 15 calls for machines other than a few missing magnets on water curtains or the curtains being broken, have all been LOM.

    Sent from my SCH-I800 using Tapatalk 2

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Athens, GA.
    Posts
    143
    The Mani factory training is a deal for 795. With hotel, breakfast, and lunch included. I think I may sign up for the introductory tech classes in March. Thanks for the heads up.

    JASON sent this from his DUMB-PHONE

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Western KY
    Posts
    1,221
    I love ice machines. They a close to if not the most complex refrigeration systems we work on. May not look like much but there is alot going on in there. Absolutely water side is 70-80% of the problems you will see but when you have to troubleshoot the refrigeration side you better have your big boy pants on. If you can become proficient on them you can handle most anything on the ref side. Training is a must but experience is the only way to get proficient. Gotta take some whoopins to get good. Good luck.

  7. #7
    I agree the Manitowoc factory classes are good. Making mistakes in the field, while embarrassing and sometimes costly, is a sure way to really learn a lesson too. I'm still smarting about that Starbucks manager who told my boss not to ever send me back there. I spent all day recovering the charge and evacuating (triple evacuating) an Ice-O-Matic that turned out to have a bad TXV. And that was like 5 or 6 years ago.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    54
    One thing I have noticed throughout the years of working on ice machines is that you need to be very patient and observe the machine when you arrive on the call unless it's something obvious (H20 overflowing into bin, restricted water filters or condensor, LOM mainly). Also yeast in the air from things like empty beer bottles and fresh bread is the machines worst enemy. Lastly and IMO but may not be true is the machines with more cycles per day, and week, and month whatever are more inclined to break down due to the fact that there are in some cases quite a few events that need to happen for a batch of ice.

    Sent from my GT-P7510 using Tapatalk 2

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Chicagoland Area
    Posts
    4,750
    Quote Originally Posted by bodhisattva View Post
    I agree the Manitowoc factory classes are good. Making mistakes in the field, while embarrassing and sometimes costly, is a sure way to really learn a lesson too. I'm still smarting about that Starbucks manager who told my boss not to ever send me back there. I spent all day recovering the charge and evacuating (triple evacuating) an Ice-O-Matic that turned out to have a bad TXV. And that was like 5 or 6 years ago.

    The GC series Iceomatics were notorious for having bad txv's. Even worse was having to change them out. The entire machine was built around the txv. All their units have issues with the timer initiate control.
    Officially, Down for the count

    YOU HAVE TO GET OFF YOUR ASS TO GET ON YOUR FEET

    I know enough to know, I don't know enough
    Liberalism-Ideas so good they mandate them

  10. #10
    I know, we ended up changing out the whole machines when the txv went. I no longer work for that company and I'm kind of glad I don't have to deal with many Ice-O's anymore.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Guayaquil EC
    Posts
    10,457
    Quote Originally Posted by apprenticehvac View Post
    Unfortunately in my current position I will never get hands on experience with any ice machines or freezers (and I am REALLY wanting to get into this area of the trade). Do any of you have any recommendations on books, guides etc? Thanks
    A good way to gain some familiarity with the various ice machines out there is to study the manufacturers' service literature, which is readily available for downloading. Here are some links to their websites:

    Manitowoc

    Hoshizaki

    Scotsman

    Ice-O-Matic

    For general commercial refrigeration systems, including freezers and such, check out some of the great textboooks which are available. One very good one is Refrigeration & Air Conditioning Technology by Whitman, Johnson & Tomczyk. (There's a good preview of the book in this link.)

    Others are Modern Refrigeration & Air Conditioning by Althouse, Turnquist & Bracciano and Commercial Refrigeration for Air Conditioning Technicians by Dick Wirz. (Check out this preview.)

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Orange County N.Y.
    Posts
    1,176
    You don't really see them anymore but the Kold Draft machines were the best teachers that I had when I started working on refrigeration, they have everything that you will ever see in an ice machine, and they can be touchy too.

    Sure was glad when them new fangled Manitowocs came out, the the new Scotsmans, then the Hoshizakis, and that's about where I'm at in my experience. Other than the G.E. plate style with the hot wire cutters, Follet nugget machines, Ice o Matics, Cornelius, other manufacturers that I can't think of righr now, and some larger models (40 tonners) that are used for comfort cooling.

    ...Ron
    Roof Rat

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    WI
    Posts
    312
    I would also strongly recomend the Manitowoc Factory School!! Lots of hands on as well.

    http://www.manitowocice.com/minisite...yserviceschool
    The postings on this site are my own and don't necessarily represent The Manitowoc Company's positions, strategies, or opinions.

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