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Thread: Am I naive?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Central NC
    Posts
    4

    Am I naive?

    I started in the electrical/controls trade 20+ years ago. I started in a warehouse threading rigid conduit for a commercial electrical contractor and after going trough an electrical apprenticeship, getting my unlimited electrical contractors licence, installing industrial and DDC controls I have found myself as the lead programmer for a growing controls contractor.

    I'm reaching 10 years with the same company and I am being told that I am reaching the top of my salary range and the only way for me to increase my pay is to become management.

    There are a couple problems with that, I'm the type of person who gets things done, not getting people to do them and I simply love programming. I started with Tridium R2 and was one of the first to become AX certified in my area. I work with a Honeywell contractor and think the Spyder controller is one of the best available today.

    My question is.....If an employee is making you money, gets the job done, and is heavily relied on is there truly a top pay mark?

    What is a reasonable salary for a controls programmer who also provides most of the technical support for the controls and sequence interpretations for a company?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    18
    Unfortunately, most companies set a salary lid on certain positions. So it is probably safe to say that you will need to move up to the next level to earn more. You could start your own business, or contract yourself out to companies in your area since you are a controls programmer.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    304

    Have you looked at automation?

    Quote Originally Posted by BMartin9000 View Post
    Unfortunately, most companies set a salary lid on certain positions. So it is probably safe to say that you will need to move up to the next level to earn more. You could start your own business, or contract yourself out to companies in your area since you are a controls programmer.
    You sound like you love a challenge, and big problems don't scare you. Robotics and automation are coming our way in a big way. Have you considered these paths at all? I keep seeing more and more articles about how manufacturing is coming back to the US, but without the workers - Just robots and programmers....... It kinda sucks for the workers, but for smart people like us, it could mean payday...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Central NC
    Posts
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by tuba View Post
    You sound like you love a challenge, and big problems don't scare you. Robotics and automation are coming our way in a big way. Have you considered these paths at all? I keep seeing more and more articles about how manufacturing is coming back to the US, but without the workers - Just robots and programmers....... It kinda sucks for the workers, but for smart people like us, it could mean payday...
    I built and installed industrial control panels for years. I was working a project in East St Louis terminating IO when a guy walked up to the panel with his laptop and started programming the PLC. I knew I wanted to be that guy. Somehow I got sidetracked and got into DDC. I love it because the fun of the challenge is there but no holiday shutdowns like with industrial work.

    Process controls are great but the diversity of DDC just due to some of the stuff engineers dream up appeals more to my creativity.

    If an opportunity in Industrial opened up again I would consider it though.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    256
    This is simple.

    Go in and ask for a raise.

    If they give it to you, good.

    If not, look for another company who will pay you what you think you're worth. If no one wants to pay you what you think you're worth, well, then you have your answer. Either you're not worth it or the market in your area can't support it. You might have to move.

    I'm an HVAC tech that loves to work on chillers. I think I am quite good at what I do. My employer didn't want to pay more, so I moved on. I moved out of state. Now I make $25,000 more than I did before. Now I feel like I am getting paid what I am worth.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Kansas City, Kansas, United States
    Posts
    13,832
    do you have friends in your area that do what you do and make more money?
    I WILL SELL WORK,GENERATE BUSINESS, GO GET NEW CUSTOMERS!
    YOU SHUT THE HELL UP AND QUIT RUNNING YOUR MOUTH!

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by TheChillerMan View Post
    This is simple.

    Go in and ask for a raise.

    If they give it to you, good.

    If not, look for another company who will pay you what you think you're worth. If no one wants to pay you what you think you're worth, well, then you have your answer. Either you're not worth it or the market in your area can't support it. You might have to move.

    I'm an HVAC tech that loves to work on chillers. I think I am quite good at what I do. My employer didn't want to pay more, so I moved on. I moved out of state. Now I make $25,000 more than I did before. Now I feel like I am getting paid what I am worth.
    Where you at now?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    256
    Quote Originally Posted by MechanicallyInclined View Post
    Where you at now?
    I left one Trane office and went to another, out of state.

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