Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1

    Best Bang for the Buck ....Seeking Advice

    Hello,
    winter is coming and I need to get ready early. I do not like being cold. I purchased my home earlier this year it was built in 1960, and the WILLIAMSON furnace (model 1115-10-4) must be original to that year.

    My problem is the furnace was retro fitted with an S86 spark unit that has now gone bad, most likely due to the heat from burner box. I am confidant that I can replace this myself, but I cannot help to wonder why not return the furnace to a stand alone pilot, as it was made.

    I realize I would then need a new valve, and possibly a transformer. These are simple devices but I do not think I can make this change without help or advice if I tried.

    So, good idea or bad? Seems to me getting rid of the pilot system would return to simple operation. I do plan on replacing the entire furnace ASAP but this may take me a season or two before I can afford it.
    (tried to add pics)

    Name:  SANY0002.jpg
Views: 77
Size:  45.0 KB
    Name:  SANY0004.jpg
Views: 70
Size:  43.5 KB

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Keokuk, IA
    Posts
    5,520
    The original system likely had few if any safety devices on it. This system has flame detection, high temp switch (in case air flow restriction or blower shuts down).

    Personally I don't think it's worth messing with. You've gottne a good solid 50 years out of it. Its' rpobably at most 70% efficient on a good day. Even just a basic 80% efficient furnace may be cheaper than you think. I'd get a small loan rather than compromise my safety with a gas heating appliance.

  3. #3
    that is good advice moto,
    but I cannot afford to replace the whole unit yet, I think replacing the existing S86 to make it work will be the bandaid needed for this upcoming season. It is not just the furnace replacement, planning for central air, new ducts etc the list goes on. You are right with the 80% thinking, this would be my choice as well. My experience in the past with high effeciancy furnaces makes me prefer a lower unit.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,837
    If you don't like to be cold, you'd better think fast and find a way to come up with the money for a new unit. Those gas valves for that unit are all but impossible to find. I tried several years ago to get one and had no luck at all. So if you don't want to get stuck in the middle of a cold snap, think long and hard about trying to milk another winter out of this old turkey. It's long since lived it useful life, several times over.
    If YOU want change, YOU have to first change.

    If you are waiting for the 'other guy' to change first, just remember, you're the 'other guy's' other guy. To continue to expect real change when you keep acting the same way as always, is folly. Won't happen. Real change will only happen when a majority of the people change the way they vote!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,548
    #1. This isn't a DIY site and we can't offer you DIY assistance.

    #2. Skippedover and Motoguy are right. I would be concerned that there is more issues with that unit than just a bad spark module.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Anderson, South Carolina, United States
    Posts
    6,730
    Call a pro to repair it. That thing is NOT efficient at all but will probably last another 60 years if maintained. I still have a brand new one in the box in my warehouse circa 1978

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    nebraska
    Posts
    1,629
    Quote Originally Posted by delamite View Post
    that is good advice moto,
    but I cannot afford to replace the whole unit yet, I think replacing the existing S86 to make it work will be the bandaid needed for this upcoming season. It is not just the furnace replacement, planning for central air, new ducts etc the list goes on. You are right with the 80% thinking, this would be my choice as well. My experience in the past with high effeciancy furnaces makes me prefer a lower unit.
    Well if you're in the Northern half of the US there will not be an 80% option after this winter. DOE regs require 90% or better up north and higher SEER AC's down south starting in May of 2013.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,992
    The best "bang for your buck" would be to get rid of that thing.
    "Hey Lama, hey, how about a little something, you know, for the effort." And he says, "there won't be any money, but when you die, on your deathbed, you will receive total consciousness." So I got that goin' for me, which is nice. - Carl Spackler

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event