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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Savage, MN
    Posts
    15
    it's really not looking that great it's gonna be a huge uphill battle how much would I even make if I did get hired on somewhere out of school on average. I just am gonna be taking out student loans and not have any help from anyone so I need to make the right choice 7 to 10 years is a while.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    East coast USA
    Posts
    957
    dude 7 years will go by fast. once you learn a trade you can fall back on it..you can always improve yourself. but if you don't do trade school what next.? fast food joints. you need to decide what you want, if you don't want to learn a trade don't... don't even start..but if you do, do the best you can...you will look back and ten years have got behind you...just think even if you start a trade at 30 years old you still have 30 to 40 years ahead of you.... maybe 50 if you stop drinking and getting all wasted.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Savage, MN
    Posts
    15
    true I am just discouraged, I don't give up and I am very smart. I can and have learned almost anything I have put my mind to. I can teach myself things. I can invision quite a bit as well I just need something to give me that boost of confidence. we'll see I guess.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Prattville, Alabama
    Posts
    1,992
    Those years will go by (fast), no matter what you are doing. And when they do, which would you rather have under your belt - years of flipping burgers or schooling? Think about what the impact of each will have on the rest of your life at that point. BTW, I was 27 when I got started in this industry. That was in 1985, looks like about the time you were born. I have made a good living in this business, and have often had a great pride of satisfaction.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    new england
    Posts
    612
    I had the same issues when i started in the trade. I was hired by a few really good companies but couldn't get insured and in a vehicle. I did construction "pipefitting" for a few years and when my record cleared up I was fortunate to finally get a chance doing service. Don't get discouraged... You could do installs for a company or maintance at a facility. The knowlege you will gain will only make you a better tech if that is the route you decide to go.
    Chaos equals cash$$$

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Toronto Canada
    Posts
    1,090
    I wasn't trying to scAre you off man. Just don't want you to go at this blindly. After school it will take 5 years of field work to know the trade. Use that time to build your knowledge. Its crazy not to better yourself because of past mistakes. When I went to trade school I had to take the bus rolled my car totaled it and lost my licence due to too many points. I went to school got my HVAC ticket and re did my driver lic but still had a bad driving record. I rode with my journeyman for 2 years. By the time I was in a van my record was clean. By the time I was asked for an abstract again I was one point away from having to use my personal insurance ontop of company insurance. So there is a way. Just gotta work harder then the guy that didn't screw up I'd say 5 years

    Goodluck

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Savage, MN
    Posts
    15
    don't worry about it man you didn't scare me off. I just know that this trade is no joke and It takes a brain not someone who wants to go to school for HVAC just to earn a bunch of money and realize that it was a lot more work then they had anticipated. I need to redeem myself and become a man. I have just made mistakes and I know that I will be scrutinized for it and it will be again no joke trying to find a job. I know that by the very most at the end of the two years I will know more then I know now I am by no means expecting to go from school to driving my own van and doing any and all tasks associated with this job. This to me would be something I would have to put my all into just like anything you get out what you put in. If I do decide to do this it's gonna start on the 27th of this month and i will be going full time everyday 8-2 and sometimes 8-5 it's gonna be going through the courses every few weeks one by one all together throughout the semester if that makes any sense I would plan on trying to go union when I get done. Seems like the most logical choice but really what do I know.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Atlanta GA area
    Posts
    20,896
    The question you need to ask yourself is: Do I want to make this my career for the rest of my life? If so, then go to school and look until you find a job. Most HVAC co's start out the new kids as installers... you might could 'ride' in that job (not drive), until your record was clear for the ins guys.

    Think about this: You are the co owner... you are in business to make $$$ for your family... you do NOT need or want a lawsuit against your co which could ruin your and your families future. Who would you hire if you had a choice between someone with 2 DUI's and someone with no DUI's? Yeah, it is simple.

    HVAC is electro-mechanical, yet it is also theoretical. You need to be strong in electrical troubleshooting (low and regular and high voltage), you need basic mechanical understanding as well as being good with your hands and hand tools. You will need to learn and master basic skills in electricity (wiring), plumbing (piping, soldering, brazing, PVC piping, etc), sheetmetal (duct and plenum building), airflow (designing and/or modifying/fixing a bad design)... and then there is the refrigeration loop where the 'freon' flows. Ever hear of latent heat? Study that principle... it will start your mind to understanding how refrigeration and AC work. Learning how to diagnose and troubleshoot that segment of equipment is a world unto itself, you will NOT learn that in books, however the book knowledge will start you towards understanding it.

    HVAC is a rewarding career if one is willing to LEARN, keep on LEARNING, and THINK... all the time. One of the long time posters here used to have a tag line that said: You are not done learning until you are dead. In HVAC, believe it!

    OK, here it is: If you would be challenged by work... that is; would get up every day wanting to learn and grow and better yourself... than HVAC might be a good field. If you just want a paycheck... then IMO HVAC might not be a good choice.

    Personally, I would not enter it unless you want to make a career of it, and learn/grow the rest of your life. Just my
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Quality work at a fair price with excellent customer service!

    Romans Ch's 5-6-7-8

    2 Chronicles 7:14

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Savage, MN
    Posts
    15
    Ok this is what I am talking about. Something in DEPTH. I am a thinker. I am observant of a lot of things that others aren't IMHO. h being humble. I have a great drive for many things I over analyze quite a bit in some cases not as much as I should in others. I know that this COULD be a very rewarding career but If my heart and mind are set on it. I am a hands on kind of guy. I am good with tools. I am also not an idiot. Again my humble opinion I just need to get ready to dig in if this is gonna pan out in the long run which seems like it will, hopefully.

    I understand completely where the employers general perspective will be at. I will be contacting different companies around the area early next week to see what some of the local places say about new hires out of school with records if they, consider them at all of what.

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Savage, MN
    Posts
    15
    I've seen my pops and others bounce around from field to field and struggle and they had wished they had stuck to one thing and gained seniority and respect in their fields, I understand what it means to look beyond the horizon. I used to be a fool. but I have come around to understand to be a man and be respected you have to respect yourself first. Then others will respect you, My family has always had great work ethic with bright minds I can be a great asset to an employer. God forbid I have to work fast food or some garbage like that I would much rather kill it through school get out pay my dues and do whatever it takes to make it happen.

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    17,904
    Quote Originally Posted by krmitt5 View Post
    I can handle it. I'm looking for real, honest answers. I am trying to be as realistic as possible here. So you are saying on a rehab program on top of anything I have already completed in the past that had to do with those convictions right??
    What I mean is that you were a part of an organized alcohol rehab program, that is typically beyond the ARD's used in many states. They have so many folks whom they have to process through the programs that the recidivism rate can be pretty high. A pro level program takes longer and has better follow up. I know this from a family member.

    After the program ends, you need support to stay sober. Just staying away from getting behind the wheel is no longer an option when you have a second DUI. That's your clue to stop drinking entirely.

    The meetings are also a record of your commitment, and commitment is what is needed by the reformed drinker.

    Having two people of good repute willing to stand up for your successful advance into the world of the sober is a good thing. Some employers are former drinkers, and this kind of imprimatur says "I'm a FORMER drinker."

    Did I explain this well enough? You can do this. If you have a couple of years of weekly meetings under your belt, you may be able to pull this off. If you are still a social drinker, I would say that you are open to failure.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

    AOP Forum Rules:







  12. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Atlanta GA area
    Posts
    20,896
    Sounds like you may have the technical skills... And sounds like you have observed it is not good to job hop. Now:

    Are you willing to stick to something regardless of whether it is easy or hard... whether you get 'fun' work or 'boring' work (or even 'sh*t' work)?

    Is the reality of a CAREER which will reward you with job satisfaction as well as $$$ worth making a decision you will NEVER back out of?

    IMO you have the tech side... what you need is to decide you want to just 'go for it'. If you do (do not make this decision lightly); then go to school, go get a job, and do not look back! Years down the road, you will look at your life and be glad you made a decision and stuck to it.
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Quality work at a fair price with excellent customer service!

    Romans Ch's 5-6-7-8

    2 Chronicles 7:14

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Savage, MN
    Posts
    15
    Ok I honestly haven't really drank for quite a while and I don't intend to, I was baptized earlier this year I grew up a catholic and I decided to become a christian for obvious reasons. I don't drink I don't like drinking and I think it is idiotic. Too many idiots already, the buzz isn't worth the hangover... or worse. I have learned my lesson with booze. I have completed court ordered programs as a result of said convictions and paid fines yada yada. I'm not a dumb kid anymore I know right from wrong and being a booze hound is a stupid waste of life. Peter 5:8 - Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour: KJV I know wisdom sir. I want to know more.

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