Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    63

    How well did school prepare you for residential work? *

    After getting your hvac/r certificate or associates degree, *did you feel install and service ready or did you feel like you needed alot more training?

  2. #2
    Well right out of school i knew a little bit, but i couldnt find a job untill recently and its been 8 months since i graduated and since i used my training but when i first got out there i looked at the unit and i was like dam i shouldve paid more attention, the electrical part was the hardest for me. School is just for safety practices and getting a cerificate in the field is where you learn.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    80
    You should learn the basics at school. Out on the job you will spend some time wondering what your even looking at.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Central WA
    Posts
    1,534
    You should have basic know how of refrigeration, combustion, air flow and electricity. Enough that you should be able to work your way through a lot of troubleshooting. Most schools teach all of these things, some better than others. Just like some students absorb this stuff better than others.

    With experience you will fly through many diagnostics - sometimes have 'em pegged before you get on-site. Just don't lose the basics because that head-scratcher will come up every once in a while. My first pizza oven it took me 3 hours to find a bad air switch on the back side of the machine. Embarrassing.

    A year in the field you will be twice the tech you are now if you make the effort to improve. Again at two years, again at five... and so on.

    Keep reading, learning and listening - this industry is changing constantly. Hopefully you will land at a shop with a couple of senior guys that like to teach. Just don't lean on 'em too much.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    660
    I got into the field and quickly realized school didn't teach me everything. I've learned more on the job than in school.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    St. Louis
    Posts
    3,425
    Quote Originally Posted by cjpwalker View Post
    You should have basic know how of refrigeration, combustion, air flow and electricity. Enough that you should be able to work your way through a lot of troubleshooting. Most schools teach all of these things, some better than others. Just like some students absorb this stuff better than others.

    With experience you will fly through many diagnostics - sometimes have 'em pegged before you get on-site. Just don't lose the basics because that head-scratcher will come up every once in a while. My first pizza oven it took me 3 hours to find a bad air switch on the back side of the machine. Embarrassing.

    A year in the field you will be twice the tech you are now if you make the effort to improve. Again at two years, again at five... and so on.

    Keep reading, learning and listening - this industry is changing constantly. Hopefully you will land at a shop with a couple of senior guys that like to teach. Just don't lean on 'em too much.
    X2

    Yep. Make damn sure you can chase low voltage from the Xfmr, thru stat, back to board and out to the condenser...and all around a furnace. Or out and thru an outdoor defrost board - even though the idiot lights say all ok.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event