Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    In a kitchen with my head stuck in an oven
    Posts
    1,220
    Post Likes

    Frymaster went BOOM!

    I've never seen an IR burner take a hit this bad...


    ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° °

    "You never know what others don't know." -

    If I can't laugh at myself...then I'll laugh at YOU! -

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Onalaska, Wisconsin
    Posts
    6,126
    Post Likes
    I was at a McDonald's once. I was working on something else.

    Then I heard a boom sound, and the cabinet doors blew open on their h50 fryer. Then the familiar beep beep beep beep Ignition Failure.

    Then a crewmember went over, closed the cabinet doors, turned the fryer off and back on.

    A few seconds later...... You guessed it, BOOM, and the cabinet doors flew open again.

    That saga continued a few times, then I asked them if they wanted me to look at their fryer. The burners looked that bad, and the sight glasses where blown out. The blower motor was locked up, it started with a bad blower motor, but from them trying to run it with delayed ignition for so long, it destroyed the burner.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    riverside calif
    Posts
    228
    Post Likes
    after a while insulation in between tiles deteriorates and that can start to happen, gonna need a insulation kit for that fryer also. how i dread fryers !!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    South East US
    Posts
    238
    Post Likes
    The only fryers I dislike are those H50 Frymasters. Such a pain to work on.

    Gimme your basic 4-burner tube fryer. "Yep, leaking at the tube weld, need a new pot/fryer"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    In a kitchen with my head stuck in an oven
    Posts
    1,220
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike19 View Post
    I was at a McDonald's once. I was working on something else.

    Then I heard a boom sound, and the cabinet doors blew open on their h50 fryer. Then the familiar beep beep beep beep Ignition Failure.

    Then a crewmember went over, closed the cabinet doors, turned the fryer off and back on.

    A few seconds later...... You guessed it, BOOM, and the cabinet doors flew open again.

    That saga continued a few times, then I asked them if they wanted me to look at their fryer. The burners looked that bad, and the sight glasses where blown out. The blower motor was locked up, it started with a bad blower motor, but from them trying to run it with delayed ignition for so long, it destroyed the burner.
    Brave bunch of folks. Usually they're scared $h!tless to touch it again when they go BOOM!. I've never seen a Frymaster blow its doors open.

    When Pitco brought their Solstice fryer to the market (with those upside-down burners) around the year 2000, they touted it as a "design with the technician in mind" for its thoughtful touches here & there to make repairs simple (which was all fine and dandy until they made the McD's version).

    Anyway, blowing the doors open was a common occurrence with those Solstice fryers. Their burner uses a screen at its outlet to help mix the air & gas. I think they called it a "dispersion" screen. However, over time it'd get clogged up with dust to a point where the gas' intended path for least resistance (through the burner face)...WASN'T. The flow through the burner would become so restricted that gas would get backed up in the burner, then out into the burner compartment, find the ignitor...and BANG!

    Pitco went back to the drawing board on that one and created an optional self-cleaning system which, upon initial fryer start-up (turning it on), ignites the gas coming directly from the burner orifice for a second or two - to blast a flame down through the burner and burn off any dust buildup in the burner face.

    Quote Originally Posted by BadBozo2315 View Post
    The only fryers I dislike are those H50 Frymasters. Such a pain to work on.

    Gimme your basic 4-burner tube fryer. "Yep, leaking at the tube weld, need a new pot/fryer"
    I know what you mean. I'd prefer that too, but that's all we have. Over thirty of 'em.

    My spic-n-span spare set of fryers are in that kitchen now and get their turn being tarnished by the cook's sloppiness. This one's going through an "extreme makeover". I have it torn all the way down to the base frame. All the electrical parts are in a heap in a tub. Just finished my second three-hour round of pressure washing all the panels today.

    That vat with the blown burner was cracked, so I pitched it. I have a rebuilt one to take its place. Haven't yet inspected the other vat in this set of fryers, but if the burners appear compromised, I'll rebuild it too with new burners and full insulation kit.

    FOR SURE...the side that went BOOM will get new ignition modules, blower & gas valve. A new latch relay, ignitors, plenum gaskets, ignition cables are a gimme. I don't know when or how the problem started which blew that burner, but anything related to gas and air flow or control is going into the trash can.
    ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° °

    "You never know what others don't know." -

    If I can't laugh at myself...then I'll laugh at YOU! -

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    76
    Post Likes
    Yikes. Most kitchens around here would replace their fryers in a heartbeat if it needed that much work!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    In a kitchen with my head stuck in an oven
    Posts
    1,220
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by Protocol. View Post
    Yikes. Most kitchens around here would replace their fryers in a heartbeat if it needed that much work!
    LOL! If I were still a field tech, I'd completely agree! I wouldn't even go there. Do a fryer vat change and requisite parts...and it'd be done.

    It's different where I work at now because I'm in-house. I spend all the time necessary on it because nobody's keeping track of man-hours. It's kind of laid back, but I'm still getting as technically into it as previously - when I ran around the city or to outlying towns within a 150 mile radius in a service van.

    I really don't miss the windshield time much, nor the stressed out attitudes of restaurant managers. I know all of the managers and Chefs here. We all work together to get it done. They treat me right in order to achieve that.
    ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° °

    "You never know what others don't know." -

    If I can't laugh at myself...then I'll laugh at YOU! -

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    riverside calif
    Posts
    228
    Post Likes
    That's the nice thing about being in- house you get to remove equipment take it to washer room/ clean / sanitize. Then work on it behind closed doors. Bench test before it goes, back out to production. Lines.


    Sent from van with a/c running

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    So-Cal
    Posts
    605
    Post Likes
    I've seen worse.
    If you let them go "BOOM" too many times that happens. replace the burner and insulation and find out why it went "BOOM", probably bad blower relay, bad blower.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Onalaska, Wisconsin
    Posts
    6,126
    Post Likes
    Name:  image.jpg
Views: 419
Size:  181.0 KB

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    In a kitchen with my head stuck in an oven
    Posts
    1,220
    Post Likes
    Good picture, Mike19.



    Quote Originally Posted by jackintheboxtec View Post
    I've seen worse.
    If you let them go "BOOM" too many times that happens. replace the burner and insulation and find out why it went "BOOM", probably bad blower relay, bad blower.
    That burner configuration is such a balancing act, with a gauntlet of problems that can cause delayed ignition. Here's my modified list from Frymaster's Tech Reference manual. For my own sake, I categorized it into separate systems some years ago while troubleshooting a delayed ignition problem that was r-e-a-l-l-y kicking my butt. I'll share it to maybe help somebody else:

    1. Ignition circuit -
      • Cracked ignitor
      • Bad ignition wire
      • Defective/damaged ignition module

    2. Gas control -
      • Incorrect/fluctuating gas pressure
      • Gas valve defective (sticking open)
      • Burned/pitted contacts in heat relay (gas side)

    3. Air control -
      • Dirty/defective combustion fan
      • Incorrect blower adjustment
      • Burned/pitted contacts in heat relay (blower side)
      • Inadequate make-up air

    4. Burner -
      • Air leak in combustion chamber or plenum gaskets
      • Failed burner tile insulation


    When first approaching a unit with a very intermittent popping, I'll go ahead and run it while peering into the burner chamber sight glasses. If burner tile insulation is starting to come loose, it will appear as short, out-of-place tendrils sticking out from the burner face. They'll be glowing from the flame and easily seen. From that, it's time for new burners.

    If the problem is more persistent (like EVERY TIME there's a call for heat), I might be so bold as to run it ONCE while watching through the sight glasses. That may reveal which side is the culprit. If I'm not feeling so bold, I'll go straight to a visual inspection without running it. I'll shut the gas valve off and check the blower operation (no gas, so no BOOM!). Then I'll tear into it to look at is the heat relay, the igniton wires and the ignitors...not necessarily in that order. While the ignitors are out, I'll inspect the burners with a flashlight. These are the easier things to do.

    If I've gotten that far and don't find anything, I'll pull the air plenum to inspect/replace the gaskets. Going this far STILL, if nothing is immediately evident, I'll go ahead and replace the heat relay, the ignitors, ignition leads and (of course) the plenum gaskets.

    In doing the above, I've succeeded in identifying and fixing the problem 99.9% of the time.

    Oddly, I've had a few delayed ignition problems lately that had a melted ignitor enrichment tube. I'd never seen that happen before until I started working in-house here three years ago. Usually I go for the ignitors first thing anyway, so I'd pull them and find one with the enrichment tube drooping some and deformed. That made for an easy fix, but still left me perplexed as to why that problem only started happening the past couple of years.

    I don't have a picture of one of those damaged ignitors. I'm simply providing the picture below so everyone knows what part of the ignitor I'm talking about:
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° °

    "You never know what others don't know." -

    If I can't laugh at myself...then I'll laugh at YOU! -

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Bakersfield CA
    Posts
    16
    Post Likes

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor MagazineThe place where Electrical professionals meet.
Comfortech 365