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Thread: TRUE door seals

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    362

    TRUE door seals

    Hey all,

    I recently replaced the door seals on a True T-72F freezer. What should have been a simple pull out and snap in swap is becoming a little frustrating. They are not sealing all the way.

    I picked them up from United, who verified the model and serial of the unit to make sure I had the right seals. I put them on and only got maybe 50% of it sealing, the other areas of the seal is "compacted" for lack of a better term. United had no suggestions for me so I called the company on the tag that was on the seals and they were frustrated that United did not give me the installation sheet of install tips. The company that made the seals first verified that I had the right part, then they told me lay them out in the sun to get them more pliable and to help strengthen the magnets. Also to make sure with a paper clip that it was magnetic all the way around. Other than that it can take around a week for them to really suck down with the magnets and seal properly. Until then, most people use duct tape to seal things up. If it doesn't eventually seal look into re-adjusting the doors a little.

    I rounded up some extra cold storage and moved all the product out, pulled the plug, and installed the seals. It's been 4 days and now I probably have about 75% of it sealing up, with some large gaps yet to fill. If I plug the unit in the doors don't vacuum down and everything frosts up so the freezer is basically useless at the moment.

    The school starts Wednesday, I've got to get this resolved in a hurry. Anything I can do to speed this up? The old seals are fully expanded and very pliable while these new ones are still firm. If I put the old seals back in the box will hold temp but the doors ice themselves shut so putting the old seals back in isn't that great an option. I can run my fingers down the seal and it will expand like I need but of course it just shrinks right back down. Anyone ever use maybe some gentle heat and run their fingers down the ridge of the seal to get it more pliable? Should I adjust the doors a little? If so, how?

    PLEASE HELP!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Fayetteville, NC
    Posts
    130
    Lay em out in the sun before you start and/or if they have a sink nearby, soak em in hot water. Really helps out alot.

    if the old ones work and they match the new ones you can try either one of those methods and it should help out alot. sometimes those things can be a pain just to seat em in the grooves.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Fayetteville, NC
    Posts
    130
    the more pliable and flexible they are before you start the easier the job will be.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    362
    It's a commercial kitchen so there's an unlimited supply of scalding hot water. Excellent idea!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    362
    I had them in the sun once on a hot day but at the time there was product in the freezer so of course they got real cold real fast.]

    I guess with warm seals and hot box they will seal up tight right away then just don't open it for a couple days? Seems like they might shrink back if I open them too soon?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Fayetteville, NC
    Posts
    130
    you didn't say that!!!! just run it through their dishwasher

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Fayetteville, NC
    Posts
    130
    just make sure to slide and move em around to make sure its not to bunched up in one area. If its really tight I have used a lil dish soap to help it wiggle into the right position.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    362
    Cool thank you! I'll be out there tomorrow so I'll get em good and hot and soap them up. They are hard to put in in some spots for sure.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    So-Cal
    Posts
    583
    I've used a heat gun to soften them up in the spots that dont seal.
    Heat it up and strech that spot out.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Guayaquil EC
    Posts
    10,460
    I agree, hot water and a dash of liquid detergent goes a long way to making these easier to install.

    A few other tips...

    I've found it also helps to check the door alignment, check the level of the box and check the true of the mullions.

    On several occasions, I've found the box itself to be out of square and somewhat racked or twisted. If the doors don't line up evenly across the tops, this is a definite sign of its being racked. Try jacking up one of the front corners to get the doors to line up.

    You can check the box for level as well. This will also tell you if it's out of square. Again, lifting a corner can help correct this. I see it as a common problem with T-Series boxes with casters instead of standard leveling legs. Often, the only way to level a box with casters is to shim them as needed.

    Then I've seen these coolers where the center mullions are bowed inward. Check them using a good straightedge like a 4 foot carpenter's level. A good field fix is to install a brace from the back side of the mullion to the back wall of the box. This will push the bowed mullion back into place so the gasket will seal properly.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    florida
    Posts
    5,514
    I like to use a BFRH to install door gaskets.
    I love the smell of phosgene first thing in the morning:

    To apply for professional membership click here


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  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    1,042
    a soft face dead blow and a few "taps" help in the corners. I always start them in the middle and work out into on corner
    You can't kiss death without it kissing you back. Death is a passionate kisser.


  13. #13
    A paint lid hammer ($2 or $3 bucks at Walmart) does well, without risking damage. I've seen techs use rollers too. like posted above, make sure you don't bunch up, that section will not expand all the way. Get them good and warm, especially if they were un-crated for a while before they were installed. Lay them in the proper shape between heating and installing. Once you get them in (if the box is warm), don't open the doors while the box pulls down. If you end up with a few spots, a hot gun can make a section pliable again.

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