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  1. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by FixItRight View Post
    You don't want to vacuum out a puddle of water is right, but why would you have that much water in your system in the first place. Seems like he is working on splits under 5 ton for the most part and that should not have that much water in them from just being open for a repair or having a leak.
    I went to the shop to grab some copper for a bushing, two peices of tubing were the same size, i come back to van, sprinkler zone fired up, flooded van, all my tools, and i know a few table spoons of water got in the linset.....grrrrrrr


    Quote Originally Posted by ICanHas View Post
    How old is the oil in vacuum? some here say that oil should be changed after each encounter with a wet system.
    :
    In any case, you can't dry wet POE like you can mineral.
    Previous worker in this field was changing once a month, which is sometimes 30 Vacs. I do it everytime, sometimes after the 2nd or 3rd vac per job.....

  2. #15
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    362
    Quote Originally Posted by chill4good View Post
    i remove the service cores, and dousche nitrogen through it.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Southwest
    Posts
    114
    Once POE oil gets saturated, you wont get below a certain value, say 700. The Drier should remove the remaining moisture. Also, the micron gauge can be maintained and cleaned. Changed the oil in your pump at least every other time. I do mine very often, almost every time. I have changed it 3 times on a chiller. Also the level should be level in the sight glass while its running. Schrader caps have to be on all valves, caps on the Liquid and suction isolation valves, and do they leak?
    Check your seals on your hoses. Theres nothing else to it.
    I also do the triple Vac with varying results.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Baton Rouge, LA
    Posts
    1,113
    I use to have a Robinair 6 CFM. I hated the thing. I suggest you buy a more reliable vacuum pump. It is expensive but you will get your moneys worth. Buy the Appion TEZ8 and the MegaFlow Speed kit.
    If you're too "open" minded, your brains will fall out.
    Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.

  5. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by B1978 View Post
    Once POE oil gets saturated, you wont get below a certain value, say 700. The Drier should remove the remaining moisture. Also, the micron gauge can be maintained and cleaned. Changed the oil in your pump at least every other time. I do mine very often, almost every time. I have changed it 3 times on a chiller. Also the level should be level in the sight glass while its running. Schrader caps have to be on all valves, caps on the Liquid and suction isolation valves, and do they leak?
    Check your seals on your hoses. Theres nothing else to it.
    I also do the triple Vac with varying results.
    I change it everytime. Sometimes after the first vac of the triple idea. I just stuffed new rubber in all connections, I got greedy and got a few orings a bit too fat and they're really snug.

    Quote Originally Posted by XcelTech View Post
    I use to have a Robinair 6 CFM. I hated the thing. I suggest you buy a more reliable vacuum pump. It is expensive but you will get your moneys worth. Buy the Appion TEZ8 and the MegaFlow Speed kit.

    Hahahahha, ill show this to the boss, and the price, I'm sure he'll laugh too.

    Looks impressive, I'm working with a plain jane YJ working/charge manifold.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Upstate SC
    Posts
    1,439
    My micron gauge doesn't like positive pressure. Oil gets pushed onto the sensor and it wont read right. I always pull vacuum for a minute before I open valve to the gauge. I also clean my gauge sensor with alcohol. Don't forget to look for driers inside the units.

    Sent from my ERIS using Tapatalk 2

  7. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by jdblack View Post
    My micron gauge doesn't like positive pressure. Oil gets pushed onto the sensor and it wont read right. I always pull vacuum for a minute before I open valve to the gauge. I also clean my gauge sensor with alcohol. Don't forget to look for driers inside the units.

    Sent from my ERIS using Tapatalk 2
    This one is rated for 400 psi, and I clean it everytime.

    Sent from my PC36100 using Tapatalk 2

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Hot Springs, Arkansas, United States
    Posts
    55
    Does your vacuum pump have a gas ballast port? This is from Yellow Jacket U If you suspect an open or wet system, be sure to use the gas ballast feature on your vacuum pump. The gas ballast prevents water vapor from condensing in the vacuum pump oil by introducing a small amount of fresh air into the pumping chamber. Open the gas ballast just slightly and then begin to watch your electronic vacuum gauge. If the vacuum stays at a consistently high level of microns or doesn’t pull down below 5,000 microns, your system still contains contamination or has a leak. Repair the leak before proceeding.

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Western KY
    Posts
    1,221
    If your hitting 500 micron and can hold it , or at least under 700 for 1/2 hr I'd say you have clean tight system. Doesn't matter how long it takes to get there as long as it gets there. As previously stated your 410A systems will take longer, much longer in some cases, then the R22 systems with MO. POE likes liquid be it refrigerant or water. Once it gets ahold of some it will not let it go without a long hard fight. Your procedures sound good and proper so relax and be patient. On a side note I like to use brute manifold set with 3/8 hose. Get a vac pump with a 3/8 connection and pull through it. Will make a big difference in pull down time.

  10. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Thorazine View Post
    Does your vacuum pump have a gas ballast port? This is from Yellow Jacket U If you suspect an open or wet system, be sure to use the gas ballast feature on your vacuum pump. The gas ballast prevents water vapor from condensing in the vacuum pump oil by introducing a small amount of fresh air into the pumping chamber. Open the gas ballast just slightly and then begin to watch your electronic vacuum gauge. If the vacuum stays at a consistently high level of microns or doesn’t pull down below 5,000 microns, your system still contains contamination or has a leak. Repair the leak before proceeding.
    I've always achieved 300-500. I don't think I have any leaks.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tommy knocker View Post
    If your hitting 500 micron and can hold it , or at least under 700 for 1/2 hr I'd say you have clean tight system. Doesn't matter how long it takes to get there as long as it gets there. As previously stated your 410A systems will take longer, much longer in some cases, then the R22 systems with MO. POE likes liquid be it refrigerant or water. Once it gets ahold of some it will not let it go without a long hard fight. Your procedures sound good and proper so relax and be patient. On a side note I like to use brute manifold set with 3/8 hose. Get a vac pump with a 3/8 connection and pull through it. Will make a big difference in pull down time.
    I was concerned of my method to keep vacuum sterile. I guess without oversized hose, it'll be turtle slow. Company wont budge on equipment. I had to fight to get a new pump, because a coworker dumped 10w-40 in it....

    Yeah.....




    Sent from my PC36100 using Tapatalk 2

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta
    Posts
    1,111
    Why not buy your own tools, that way you can take them with you and no one else can mess with them?

  12. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by syndicated View Post
    Why not buy your own tools, that way you can take them with you and no one else can mess with them?
    I was hired to replace sinks and buff drywall repairs. Handbook said basic tools required. They want hvac fixed, they can fork out some hardware my opinion anyways.
    Sent from my PC36100 using Tapatalk 2

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    The Hot South
    Posts
    1,317
    Your methods look good but I would blow out all of the nitrogen before you hook up the vacuum pump. Your not going to get any moisture going into your system through your 2 hoses and manifold by letting all the nitrogen out.

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