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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    MD
    Posts
    32

    Compressor Condensation

    I have a Carrier 25HNB648 compressor the coolant return line is producing a lot of condensation on the order of several gallons a day, it looks like most of the condensation is being produced at night. The problem is my compressor sits on top of a wooden retaining wall.

    The exterior lines to the unit were insulated by the installer, but the lines inside the cabinet are not insulated.

    I first impression is that the lines inside the cabinet need to be wrapped, but then I read that the problem may be caused by either low airflow or over/under charging.

    The Compressor was recently relocated (because of a neighbor’s complaint) it sweated in both locations. Before it just watered the grass but now it’s going to rot out the retaining wall.

    I have a FE4ANB005 Fan Coil and an Infinity control the T-Stat is set for comfort blower is set to auto.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Northern VA 38 degrees N by 76 degrees W
    Posts
    5,058
    Over charged or low load

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    MD
    Posts
    32
    I have a 2400 sqft tri level house, 2/3 brick and 1/3 siding, it has 3 doors and 24 windows, but no insulation in the exterior walls, on a hot day it runs constantly.
    It replaced a 3 ton unit which could barely cool the house below 78.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Northern VA 38 degrees N by 76 degrees W
    Posts
    5,058
    Quote Originally Posted by ATC USN View Post
    I have a 2400 sqft tri level house, 2/3 brick and 1/3 siding, it has 3 doors and 24 windows, but no insulation in the exterior walls, on a hot day it runs constantly.
    It replaced a 3 ton unit which could barely cool the house below 78.
    Do you have any service tickets with performance data on them. An undersized duct system would cause this issue. Jumping one ton without redoing the duct system to compensate for the additional air can and usually will lead to equipment failure.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Central Fla.
    Posts
    311
    You need a professional to go out to your home and check it all out. Too many items can cause your unit to do what you are describing.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    NW AR
    Posts
    2,478
    Air flow through the condenser usually dries up the majority of the condensation from the suction line. It IS all to common for me to see compressors sweating like a whore in church. Overcharge, dirty evap/poor airflow. Have it checked by a pro.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Athens, Ohio
    Posts
    1,695
    A wooden retaining wall? If this wall is outside, doesn't it get wet when it rains or snows? If it isn't treated lumber it is going to rot anyway.
    Is the entire compressor sweating or just the point where the suction line enters? The latter is normal, the former is not.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    MD
    Posts
    32
    No service tickets with performance data.

    The suction lines are definitely sweating, but the compressor is wrapped in a blanket I cannot tell if it is sweating, there is water dripping out from what look likes rubber grommet with metal tangs, (maybe a compressor shock mount or blanket drain) under the cabinet.

    The compressors and fan coil was installed in May 2012. I had the compressor relocated last week because the neighbor was complaining. It sweated in both locations.

    There are 18 supplies and two returns a 14 X 14 first level and a 28 X 14 third level.
    The fan coil is located in a crawl space under the second level.
    The installer checked the duct work air capacity was 4500 CFM. I don’t remember the measurements but the supply and return duct work was larger than the fan coil the installer had to use reducers on both ends. The three ton unit was undersized it never shut off.

    My T-Stat displays the static pressure it is .54 which is within limits.

    The wall is made from landscaping timbers, even pressure treated lumber will rot if exposed to water 24/7 also the wall is under an eave and the gutters are drained into a ravine 40 feet away.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Palmyra, Missouri, United States
    Posts
    224
    This is the Ask Our Pro's forum. In order to post a response here, you must have verified qualifications and have been approved by the AOP Committee. You may ask a question by starting a new thread.

    You can find the rules for posting and qualifications here.

    Additional infractions may result in loss of posting privileges.
    Last edited by jpsmith1cm; 08-07-2012 at 04:35 PM. Reason: Non AOP member

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cincinnati, Oh
    Posts
    4,926
    Quote Originally Posted by ATC USN View Post
    No service tickets with performance data.

    The suction lines are definitely sweating, but the compressor is wrapped in a blanket I cannot tell if it is sweating, there is water dripping out from what look likes rubber grommet with metal tangs, (maybe a compressor shock mount or blanket drain) under the cabinet.

    The compressors and fan coil was installed in May 2012. I had the compressor relocated last week because the neighbor was complaining. It sweated in both locations.

    There are 18 supplies and two returns a 14 X 14 first level and a 28 X 14 third level.
    The fan coil is located in a crawl space under the second level.
    The installer checked the duct work air capacity was 4500 CFM.
    You must have hit the 4 instead of a 1 there. It is rare to find a residential system out that handles 4500 cfm. Thats 11+ tons of cooling. Your returns diffenetly wouldn't handle that.


    I don’t remember the measurements but the supply and return duct work was larger than the fan coil the installer had to use reducers on both ends. The three ton unit was undersized it never shut off.

    My T-Stat displays the static pressure it is .54 which is within limits.

    The wall is made from landscaping timbers, even pressure treated lumber will rot if exposed to water 24/7 also the wall is under an eave and the gutters are drained into a ravine 40 feet away.
    Am I the only one here that thinks a condensating suction line is normal?
    Inlet, lets say 72* return, could be as high as 43* saturated suction. TXV 10* superheat, suction temp 53. 53* is probably below the dew point in my area today. Now the line is sweating.

    I've never heard of a suction line sweating gallons a day.
    But, I'm just a installer.
    "Better tell the sandman to stay away, because we're gonna be workin on this one all night."

    "Dude, you need more than 2 wires to a condenser to run a 2 stage heatpump."

    "Just get it done son."

    Dad adjusted

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    1,908
    The suction line WILL SWEAT if the OD air meets its dewpoint temp. Wonder how much does it cost to insulate the suction line within the unit ALL THE WAY to the compressor? I am sure this compressor has the blanket cover.

    I don't think the unit is over-charged causes MORE SWEAT because the inside has TXV (hopefully it is properly installed).

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    NW AR
    Posts
    2,478
    No doubt the suction line will sweat but your compressor shouldnt be pouring water. that was my point anyway

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cincinnati, Oh
    Posts
    4,926
    Quote Originally Posted by just_opinion View Post
    The suction line WILL SWEAT if the OD air meets its dewpoint temp. Wonder how much does it cost to insulate the suction line within the unit ALL THE WAY to the compressor? I am sure this compressor has the blanket cover.

    I don't think the unit is over-charged causes MORE SWEAT because the inside has TXV (hopefully it is properly installed).
    I don't think the question is how much does it cost to insulate.
    I think the question is why the heck does it matter.

    Seriously though. Several gallons? A day?
    At 4 gallons a day (if the unit runs literally 24 hours, which I doubt), your looking at about a quart every hour.

    I am officially claiming:
    "Pics or it didn't happen."
    Or I should say video.
    "Better tell the sandman to stay away, because we're gonna be workin on this one all night."

    "Dude, you need more than 2 wires to a condenser to run a 2 stage heatpump."

    "Just get it done son."

    Dad adjusted

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