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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    9

    Lightbulb york yscabbs1cgas

    We have a york water cooled chiller with a flooded evap. The problem has been that its experiencing high discharge pressures. So far we have cleaned the pumps,strainers, cooling tower and even punched the tubes. This had no help on the head pressure which is running 74/252. We decided that the unit might be overcharged and his would also explain the the loss of oil in the seperator. We removed about 40 lbs of r22. The end result was pressures of 52/233. the head pressure dropped some and now we are going out on low pressure or a bad evap sensor. Slider valve only opens up to about 76% and we are running 100% motor amps. Any suggestions on what could be happening? I think we need to check the flow orfice but the boss don't. Please help. Whats the correct way to obtain your superheat. If anyone has a tech manual on this screw unit i could really use it. Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Prattville, Alabama
    Posts
    1,742
    To start with, what are entering condenser water temp, leaving condenser water temp, entering condenser water pressure, and leaving condenser water pressure ? Be sure to use a single gauge to measure water pressures, to rule out the possibility of gauge error. Move that one gauge from one port to the other to take the readings.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    1,033
    Slider valve only opens up to about 76% and we are running 100% motor amps.
    Slide valve position and motor current do not go hand in hand necessarily. Like Nuclrchiller said we need some additional information.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    1,033
    Check your email inbox.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    MEXICO
    Posts
    457
    inhibit slide valve loanding 251.3 psig
    allow slide valve loanding 250 psig

    leaving condenser water =?
    entering condenser water=?
    sat. cond. temp?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    9
    hThanks,
    The entering water temp for the cond. is 80 and the leaving is 87
    Entering evap is 64 and leaving is 60 which low. will get pressures later when I get back to the job.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    1,033
    The design data may help as well. If you have a 10 degree machine then something isn't quite right because you are doing more work in the condenser than you are doing in the evaporator. If you are doing 7 degrees in the condenser then you should be doing 7 degrees in the evaporator. If you have a three pass evaporator (12-14 degree evaporator) then you should be doing a higher delta in the evaporator than the condenser.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Prattville, Alabama
    Posts
    1,742
    Take surface temp of condenser head on end opposite of piping. If warmer than leaving water temp of condenser, there is water passing thru/by the divider in the piping end head.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    MEXICO
    Posts
    457
    leaving condenser water - sat. condenser temp= aproach condenser

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Dixiana, AL
    Posts
    2,609
    Quote Originally Posted by Nuclrchiller View Post
    Take surface temp of condenser head on end opposite of piping. If warmer than leaving water temp of condenser, there is water passing thru/by the divider in the piping end head.
    ?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Prattville, Alabama
    Posts
    1,742
    Quote Originally Posted by klove View Post
    ?
    I'm not sure what you're questioning, klove. The method of the test? The need for the test? It appears to me the OP may have flow issues on both the evaporator and the condenser, with condenser issues being the original complaint. This test for a bypassing divider plate is extremely easy (an infrared thermometer is usually sufficient) and very quick. In my opinion a quick and easy way to verify, or rule out, the possibility. At least on a large amount of bypass. Not sure about a small amount, but I think it would provide some evidence. In fact, I make this a normal part of a run inspection.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Dixiana, AL
    Posts
    2,609
    Quote Originally Posted by Nuclrchiller View Post
    I'm not sure what you're questioning, klove. The method of the test? The need for the test? It appears to me the OP may have flow issues on both the evaporator and the condenser, with condenser issues being the original complaint. This test for a bypassing divider plate is extremely easy (an infrared thermometer is usually sufficient) and very quick. In my opinion a quick and easy way to verify, or rule out, the possibility. At least on a large amount of bypass. Not sure about a small amount, but I think it would provide some evidence. In fact, I make this a normal part of a run inspection.
    Sorry, B. Misread your post and hit the button too quick. My apologies.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Prattville, Alabama
    Posts
    1,742
    Quote Originally Posted by klove View Post
    Sorry, B. Misread your post and hit the button too quick. My apologies.
    No problem. And no apology needed.

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