What do techs expect out of Dispatchers?
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  1. #1
    Who comes first the customer or the Tech?

  2. #2
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    Feb 2006
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    Lexington, Ky
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    There has to be a balance. Techs have lives too.

  3. #3
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    Aug 2002
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    manitowoc wisconsin
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    Depends on the situation your question is to vague.
    Take your time & do it right!

  4. #4
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    Aug 2006
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    although you have to be nice to the customer, the tech comes first. that being said, and probably hated for saying it,there are several reasons for this statement.1. the customer needs us more than we need them, otherwise they would fix their own unit.2.techs make you your money, sure you can have an install crew but try not having a service department after its put in.3.the tech will keep customers coming back time after time.now this is not to be said that techs should have free reins.we can always be replaced. the tech has to be polite, professinal,and courteous along with being able to fix the unit. in the long run though no tech no bussiness.this may be just an opinion of s service tech, but another thing is when all other oersonel are home and something happens who do they call not a dispatcher......

  5. #5
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    I think the techs come first for a couple of reasons.............

    1. Without the techs you can't service your customers needs.
    2. If you treat your techs right, they will in turn take care of your customers.

    ....Worked for a couple of shops that treated there service techs like redheaded stepchildren and then could't understand why customer service wasn't very good.

  6. #6
    Actually the company that I work for the dispatcher doesnt get off until the techs are done. The dispatcher takes care of the techs 24 hours a day. If the dispatcher is not there to help answer questions who does. In our company we just recently made a policy that the dispatcher takes the phones at night as well as on the weekend & if we have an emergency then we call the on call tech. I have found that it makes it alot easier for the tech to do there job without having to answer phones while trying to fix a unit. I feel that the techs & the dispatcher should go hand in hand, in order to have a good/happy tech you need a good dispatcher to make there day go smoother. What is it that makes a good dispatcher what helps techs out the most?

  7. #7
    Originally posted by markettech
    I think the techs come first for a couple of reasons.............

    1. Without the techs you can't service your customers needs.
    2. If you treat your techs right, they will in turn take care of your customers.

    ....Worked for a couple of shops that treated there service techs like redheaded stepchildren and then could't understand why customer service wasn't very good.
    one more point here.
    It is easier to get another customer when you lose one. It is not so with aquiring a tech to replace the one who just quit or moved away.
    Customers are born afresh daily while techs require YEARS to develope!

    First five years of a "good" techs life in the field are a horrible time for everyone. The next ten are his finest. After that, he is either in his ideal position with less physical stress and strain or he is (A) dead, or (B) a contractor his self, or (C) a salesman, or (D) he has cross trained and joined another trade.

    And for the few exceptional service mechanics we have in this industry, their numbers look like this:
    first 2 years, lotta hard work, but they are ready for it because of several factors.
    1) they have the right background for it.
    2) they got the best attitude for it.
    3) they got the best education available.
    4) they got a Mentor, someone they could fall back upon to show them the ropes, less the critical spirit that most managers demonstrate to their new guys. (augh!)
    5) they got a GREEEEEEAAAAAT BOSS!!!
    6) their great boss hired a great dispatcher!
    7) whenever they messed something up, they were given forgiveness and not condemnation!!!

    By the end of five years, they are capable of handling almost anything, anywhere at any time! (82 Airborn)


    Honestly, it costs less to maintain a customer than it does to find a new one. But frankly some customers demand more than they are willing to pay for. So you gotta drop em. No other way is feasible.
    And that goes for service mechanics also.
    But we are harder to come by, so we should be your most valued and respect resouce.
    Rather than treating us like "Flex-Labor" which were brought in out of a temp agency.

  8. #8
    Originally posted by acdispatch
    I feel that the techs & the dispatcher should go hand in hand, in order to have a good/happy tech you need a good dispatcher to make there day go smoother. What is it that makes a good dispatcher what helps techs out the most?
    I love what your company is doing ... and I agree with their policy as described.

    here is a list of mine of good points to make life better for the service man AND the office staff.

    1) verify the need for the call.
    I have been dispatched to calls which had already been fixed, the day before, by another service company. So it was a wasted effort to go there. We still got paid, but somebody messed up by double booking the repair order.


    2) verify that the tech you are sending has experience on the type of system.
    Not all mechanics are equal. Some are 50% men, some 80% and a few are 100% service mechanics.

    Often times, even a 100% man, or woman, isnt the best one to dispatch to a certain call, depending upon system quirks, (special needs) which would make even a great mechanic slow. And this can be eliveated by phoning the last mechanic who was sent out there, asking him to phone the man you wish to send out there and asking if they think your man is able to handle the job. Now this could or may not create a pride issue amongst the crew.
    Sometiems the service manager has a pretty good idea who is and who sint capable of doing a special system.

    ASK first whenever the question arrises.

    3) I dont miind staying out late, but I dont like being disturbed once I finally do arrive home.
    So if you have an after hours call and you know who is already out there still working, or who is in need of the OT hours, or is single and greedy ... get them to take the late night call... cause they probably wil love ya for it. Where as I would not aprecaite it.

    While I'm on the job, I am up for it. But once I head for the barn ... I am on the downhill side. And it all slides over the edge, so to speak ... once I find my recliner.

    4) work out a com line with the mechanics so they phone you if they anticipate being more than 90 minutes on any service call.
    Well, unless your sending them out of state, waaay out of town or anything in a super market
    (or a system change-out or unit replacement) Of course those will require many hours to complete.

    That way, they know they'll be touching base with you once they make their initial 20 minute diagnosis. That IS how long it shoudl take so I assume your people work that way also.

    5) unless your people are geniuses with maps and directions, figure out a way to AVOID them getting either lost or stuck sitting in traffic.
    Jus make sure they know where they need to go and the best way to get there.
    Now I know some calls are repeats so the guys who normally drive there ... it's a no brainer. But whenever a new guy is making his initial venture there... have another tech give them a heads up FIRST.


    6) get your guys to the right system, the first time, or else.
    Unless there is only ONE SYSTEM which the call could be, make sure there is a method of identifying which sucker needs service. Often an account, (unless it's residential only), will have fifteen systems and your guys need to hit the correct one, the very first time.

    7) learn your peopl's strengths and weaknesses.
    I know market men who would rather eat dirt than service an ice machine.
    And I know a/c guys who would rather change a compressor in the middle of July at noon, than to do a Preventative maintenance filter change project. no matter how many filters it is. Period.
    I can service a market rack or an ice machine or a whip cream machine, and it holds only four onces of refrigerant! But not everyone is versatile.
    And no matter what the boss may say, a man or woman will always perform their best work when they are working on systems they tend to favor and feel comfortable with. Especially when the stress is hot and time is at a premium!

    remember this rule: one size does NOT fit all! Choose the right tech for the right job. Or suffer consequences.

    8) send the man who is gonna have the part alreay oin their truck. Some guys specialize in the types of systems they service. So a guy who usually does low temp work, he aint gonna have certain parts which are special to hi temp work. And vica versa. again, this comes about from knowing your guys and their strengths and weaknesses.

    It also is derived from ... a guy who just spent the week doing bearing and shaft change outs on a market air handler ... he is definately going to have pullers, grease, never seize, sockets and emery cloth and large pry bars. And he will probably have the correct temperment do this job again, now that he recently has some practice

    Whereas another guy who has done the job, but not recently, he may not even have the stuff he needs on the truck right now.

    To say that some men are moody or prefer only certain jobs over others ... this would be an understatement!

    Once more, you will get the best job done by choosing the best man for that type of job.
    And always schedule whatever can be scheduled. And have the manpower and the materials there to begin properly.


    I dont wanna puff your head up too big, but your job is so important that you can either make or break any technician on this planet!

    You are the hub central of your men in the loop! YOU are the kingpin!


    I jus covered some hi points, for the moment. If you want more ... let me know. I got more. .. much more.

  9. #9
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    right, here! in the heartland of the homeland!
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    Talking customer comes first

    customer pays the wage!
    as long as the customer is reasonable, and is well informed by the tech, and pays his/her bill!
    and makes the right choice, for everyone!

  10. #10
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    what do techs expect out of dispatchers? is this the topic here?

    Originally posted by acdispatch
    Who comes first the customer or the Tech?
    OR IS THE TOPIC , WHO COMES FIRST THE CUSTOMER
    THE CUSTOMER DOESNT KNOW ENOUGH INFO TO MAKE A WELL informed decision, and the dispatcher, doesnt know enough either!
    end of story-bottom line, period!
    help your techs help you make money and pay your bills dont piss them off, because the customer doesnt want to pay their bill, or doesnt like the techs answers!
    or any other reason.
    work togeather and everyones happy!

  11. #11
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    Jun 2004
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    Maryland's Eastern Shore
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    I think a good combination is a dispatcher/router and a seperate call-taker/customer service rep. CSR takes the call and schedules the service call. Dispatcher gives the technicians the calls, calls the customer when the tech is on the way with an ETA, and routes calls so that techs work towards home. Dispatcher should have a good knowledge of the service area for moving calls around and a certain level of comradary with the techs. In the eyes of the CSR, customers come first, in the eyes of the dispatcher, technicians come first. This can be done with a single person, but something always gets thrown to the side. I had one dispatcher, Fred, who was a great guy, took some heat from the management for helping us out but the company moral was high. He left and they hired a complete lack of personality that would jump and scream if the GPS screen showed a slight variation of where we were supposed to be and where we were and company moral was low.

  12. #12
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    Jul 2006
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    Washington
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    I agree with R12

    I don't agree with the philosophy of "customer pays the wage" as a reason to counter R12 post

    We all know that customers pays everyones wage, but its the tech who talks to them last. A good people person tech like myself can smooth over most customer complaints.
    And make the company look good and themselves even if we don't have a clue of what the problem is

  13. #13
    I worked 4-12 two winters ago in Boston and overnight on call, the answering service took over at midnight. The dispatcher used to stack up calls for the worst sections of Boston and give them to the answering service just before midnight, he never verified the customers phone number just having to look at the caller id display was too much and usually neglected to tell the customer when it was COD and how they had to pay. I remember one Friday night not having a part and telling the customer someone would be there in the morning (a contract customer). The dispatcher hid the ticket so it was waiting for me Monday night, still no part. I eventually quit over all this because they wouldn't replace the dispatcher he was related to someone.

    A good dispatcher makes the job less stressful whereas a bad dispatcher can drive you up a wall.

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