View Poll Results: What is most important on an HVACR resume?

Voters
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  • Length of applicable experience

    7 36.84%
  • Variety of abilities and work done

    5 26.32%
  • Education, i.e. degrees, certifications, licenses

    3 15.79%
  • Well-written and intriguing

    1 5.26%
  • Nothing, resumes are pointless

    3 15.79%
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Results 1 to 13 of 45
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Posts
    35

    Lightbulb As an employer, what do you want to see in a resume and/or cover letter???

    Hey everyone,

    I was in the midst of updating my resume and thought I would be doing a disservice by not posting this thread since any post here may help me and, I'm sure, others upgrade their resumes.

    What would you, if hiring, want to see in an applicant's resume and/or cover letter?
    What would really interest you or grab your attention?
    What would make you think, "I need to interview this individual"?
    Would you prefer a lot of details of work done or a concise list of all types of work that one has and is able to do?
    What do you absolutely not want to see on a resume?


    All comments no matter how short, long, concise or detailed are greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
    Keep it short. 1 page max.

    Things I want to see:
    - Total number of years in HVAC/R
    - Quickly figure how long you stayed at each previous job
    - How much experience you have in THIS type of work (customize for each
    job you are applying for).
    - If you managed/supervised people, how many (example - team leader of
    3)
    - EPA card and Tech School. List any other certifications BRIEFLY, and I
    don't need dates and locations (the year at the most).
    - Correct spelling and punctuation. Show me that if you try, you can be
    professional.
    - Skills that you are strong in. Anyone can braze copper. How about
    Aluminum? EMS your thing - list it.
    - References -In the trade. Yes, I am going to call them before we sit
    down.

    Things I don't want to see:
    - History before HVAC. Its great you worked at the local grocery store in
    high school, but I don't care.
    - Your hobbies and interests. If I hire you, we can talk about all that then.
    - Anything about your family, religion, or age. I have legal rules I have to
    follow about discrimination. Don't make my job harder.
    - BS schools. I am not going to think your awesome because you went to
    a 1 day school at your parts house on compressors.
    - References out of the trade. Its swell that your Pastor thinks your
    great, but I don't care.

    Things that guarantee your resume will go in the trash:
    - Short history at multiple jobs. It will take me about 2 years to get
    you fully trained on my equipment. If your longest job history is about
    that long, forget it. Be prepared to explain why you left those other
    jobs (hint - it had better be because you were improving your career,
    or had to relocate). I don't want to hear that your other boss was an
    A-hole - you will have to work with A-holes everywhere.
    - Inconsistent line of work. I need to know you like the smell of compressor
    oil and working in the heat.
    - 27 copies of Internet ready diplomas.

    Hope you find this info useful.

  3. #3
    ...like he said
    (The wise men of modern thought) adore a god made of putty or of wax - plastic, effeminate, molluscous, with no masculine faculty about him, and no quality that entitles him to the respect of just and honest men, for a being who cannot be angry at wrongdoing is destitute of one of the essential virtues, and a moral Ruler who is not angry with the wicked, and who refuses to punish crime, is not divine. ---Spurgeon

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    275
    Quote Originally Posted by Blows_Sucks_Heats_Cools View Post
    - References -In the trade. Yes, I am going to call them before we sit
    down
    several years ago I was looking for a job and started my regular job search by calling employers, I called one place and spoke to the service manager who happened to be a female, she was very rude and belligerent to say that least for no reason. I stayed on the phone and answered her questions even though I already made up my mind that I would never work for her, she wanted my references so I gave them to her, my former bosses...lets just say that after she spoke to them she called me 2 times to offer me a job without even meeting me..I respectfully declined, I found a job that same day.

    Calling references before even meeting the person is a waste of time...they might just decline your job offer, both parties have to get a feel for the opportunity, not just the employer.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by jrmech View Post
    Calling references before even meeting the person is a waste of time...they might just decline your job offer, both parties have to get a feel for the opportunity, not just the employer.
    I get your point. I will talk to you on the phone, and you will have cleared the first round before I call. I have done this for many years, and, in my experience, I have saved a lot more time and energy than I have lost. I very rarely have a candidate that turns down a job. I often cut a candidate after the reference check. Almost always because a resume is more colorful than real life.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Jacksonville,Fl
    Posts
    123
    Blow is on point with just about all of that. I wouldn't call a prospect's current employer first, but the others are fair game, why else would you list them?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Posts
    35
    Wow!!! Thanks a ton guys--especially Blows_Sucks_Heats_Cools! I didn't expect to get that much detail and all of the advice seems to be right on. I know the one page rule is very important when it comes to resumes since most employers and managers don't have the time to read through your life story; however, I am having a hard time doing this since I have 7 HVACR certifications and don't want to leave any out(I studied my @#$ off for them).

    A few things I'm thinking about removing or cutting down...

    1. I volunteered as an assistant instructor in a college-level interviewing class in which I delivered numerous presentation and lectures. Though not related to HVACR service work, it does indicate strong interpersonal and communication skills.
    2. I have an Associate of Science Degree in Finance.
    3. I first learned the trade at a small air-conditioning and refrigeration program which is not accredited by anything but was taught by people who were very well versed in both theory and practice. It was a year and a half long program(longer than many well-known HVACR programs) and was far from a walk in the park. The thing is, I've done numerous things in the program that I have never performed on the job and worked on systems that I have not touched on the job either.

    Which of these things are relevant and should be put in?
    Which should be dropped?

    My resume is currently at two pages, and with one being the goal, something has to go.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Jacksonville,Fl
    Posts
    123
    I'll add one more thing, while I have no problem with a longer resume, PLEASE MAKE SURE YOUR EXPERIENCE IS RELEVANT TO THE JOB YOU ARE SEEKING!

    Just my opinion here, but if you want to be an HVAC service tech, skip #1 & 2, because they lead me to believe you won't be happy turning a wrench. Will you be happy turning a wrench? Then expand on #3. The finance degree will help you in management positions in the future, or if you decide to start your own thing.

  9. #9
    I agree with Krzyd. Tailor the resume to the job. I cant stress that enough. What job are you applying for - that will tell you what to cut, or "one line". I would list your certifications all in one line. You can explain them in person if they are relevant.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by caskratos View Post
    Thanks a ton guys--especially Blows_Sucks_Heats_Cools!
    No problem. I hope others read this and it helps them. It is shocking how bad some of the resume are that I get.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Baton Rouge, LA
    Posts
    1,114
    I wouldn't use any of the 3. Small and uncredited makes me think you have a poor base of knowledge.

    The number one thing I look for is proof of attendance. I will take a 3 year tech with proof of 100% attendance at school and/or work over a 20 year guy who misses 1 day more then the amount of his sick leave and vacation time.

    If you use up all your sick leave and vacation time, in my company, that means you have missed 16 days of work.
    That means you have been paid 56 hours for work you haven't done,
    I have lost out on 128 billable hours, if I charge $100/hr I lost out on $128,000ish dollars of billable time.
    Plus the 56 hours of PTO, lets say I pay you $20/hr or $1120 for a total revenue loss of $129,120.
    More if I have to pay other techs overtime to keep up with demand.

    I like long fancy resumes filled to the brim with usable information, well designed for quick clean reading(not garbage space fillers or large words).
    It tells me you put time and effort into finding a good paying career. It is always a career and never a job. Career implies long term.

    Your resume is an advertisement of you.

    It needs to catch my eye with its clean, easy to read flow.
    It needs to keep my attention and be crisp.

    I prefer a one page of your past achievements, experience, and vital information.

    I like a 2nd page of usable education or hobbies that is tailored to the position 'I enjoy building and programing robots, I rebuild old cars..' (I don't want to see that you play cricket or have a stamp collection), as well as your references.

    I would also like to have 3 to 5 letters of recommendation from customer/employers/teachers (no friends, family members, or fellow employees unless they were in some way your boss).

    Here is an example of what I like.
    If you're too "open" minded, your brains will fall out.
    Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Current whereabouts unknown
    Posts
    640
    Quote Originally Posted by XcelTech View Post
    If you use up all your sick leave and vacation time, in my company, that means you have missed 16 days of work.
    That means you have been paid 56 hours for work you haven't done,
    I have lost out on 128 billable hours, if I charge $100/hr I lost out on $128,000ish dollars of billable time.
    Plus the 56 hours of PTO, lets say I pay you $20/hr or $1120 for a total revenue loss of $129,120.
    the math is a little off there, but i hear what you are saying
    It matters not how strait the gate,
    How charged with punishments the scroll,
    I am the master of my fate:
    I am the captain of my soul.

    -- William Ernest Henley

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Baton Rouge, LA
    Posts
    1,114
    Not sure what might be wrong, of course this is all assuming I had to turn down 128 hours of work because I didn't have someone to fulfill it. I think the correct term is not lost revenue so much as missed revenue. In reality it would be more like I had to push back some work and have some guys working over time. On the other hand, the time I pushed some work back into could have been filled by other work so, it isn't as cut and dry as what I said but it is a significant revenue loss if the technician is a mildly sufficient tech.
    If you're too "open" minded, your brains will fall out.
    Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.

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