I need to vent!!!! - Page 2
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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    DFW Metroplex
    Posts
    4,910
    Originally posted by hvac71
    where exactly in wisconsin markettech?
    Eau Claire

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Middletown, Ohio USA
    Posts
    571
    Cracker:

    Your story sure sounds familiar. It reminds me of a service manager I once had. We used to call him "Amazing Jerry" because it was amazing how fast and how frequent the guy's face would turn red with anger and how often he would have a fit over the most minor occurences. Generally, he was good for maybe 40-45 minutes out of a 60 minute service meeting.

    I don't understand the HVAC management mindset. It's like they're stuck in the quicksand of Management by Subjective (i.e., If I want to cuss you I will; technicians are a dime a dozen; and a customer's only as good as the money that can be finangled out of them). Contemporary mangement theory goes out the window when it is applied in the HVAC industry.

    Sure, there are a few good companies out there that train, retain, and treat their workers as human beings to the betterment of the technician, the customer, and the profit margin. And I'm not talking about companies having to treat prima donna technicians like royalty; just with a certain level of common decency, fairness, and honor like there used to be in the "old days" of the HVAC industry. There was a real brotherhood in the trade then. Companies didn't bad mouth another company or technician's (with your company or another's were never to be publicly lambasted. Service managers were leaders, not merely managers of the status quo.

    Unfortunately, HVAC managers that express a vision and are able to spread that vision by living it out and pulling along their subordinates are few and far between. Most push and intimidate their employees in a vain effort to accomplish some goal. It's so much easier to yell. You don't get good production out of embittered employees utilizing these tactics. Subsequently, you have fewer truly pleased customers as there is less a tendency for one to "go the extra mile" in this type of work environment.

    Fortunately, there are a few good companies out there who really live what they claim. Unfortunately, they are not in the majority. They are difficult to obtain employment with unless someone retires or there is an upswing in business and you have an inside contact. That's a good thing. Companies like that don't have to cry about a "technician shortage" or bemoan the fact that there are so few good technicians out there. Good techs beat a path to their door.

    Firing someone for asking a question is crazy. Word gets out on the streets, and who are you going to hire as a replacement?
    See, the human mind is kind of like... a pi๑ata. When it breaks open, there's a lot of surprises inside. Once you get the pi๑ata perspective, you see that losing your mind can be a peak experience. ~Jane Wagner

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    wisconsin
    Posts
    71

    Smile

    dont know anyone that far north ,but further down (masdison)they are looking for refrig tech...i will keep my eyes out for ya though...

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Near Chicago, IL
    Posts
    3,317
    Originally posted by Ammonianite
    Cracker:

    Your story sure sounds familiar. It reminds me of a service manager I once had. We used to call him "Amazing Jerry" because it was amazing how fast and how frequent the guy's face would turn red with anger and how often he would have a fit over the most minor occurences. Generally, he was good for maybe 40-45 minutes out of a 60 minute service meeting.

    I don't understand the HVAC management mindset. It's like they're stuck in the quicksand of Management by Subjective (i.e., If I want to cuss you I will; technicians are a dime a dozen; and a customer's only as good as the money that can be finangled out of them). Contemporary mangement theory goes out the window when it is applied in the HVAC industry.

    Sure, there are a few good companies out there that train, retain, and treat their workers as human beings to the betterment of the technician, the customer, and the profit margin. And I'm not talking about companies having to treat prima donna technicians like royalty; just with a certain level of common decency, fairness, and honor like there used to be in the "old days" of the HVAC industry. There was a real brotherhood in the trade then. Companies didn't bad mouth another company or technician's (with your company or another's were never to be publicly lambasted. Service managers were leaders, not merely managers of the status quo.

    Unfortunately, HVAC managers that express a vision and are able to spread that vision by living it out and pulling along their subordinates are few and far between. Most push and intimidate their employees in a vain effort to accomplish some goal. It's so much easier to yell. You don't get good production out of embittered employees utilizing these tactics. Subsequently, you have fewer truly pleased customers as there is less a tendency for one to "go the extra mile" in this type of work environment.

    Fortunately, there are a few good companies out there who really live what they claim. Unfortunately, they are not in the majority. They are difficult to obtain employment with unless someone retires or there is an upswing in business and you have an inside contact. That's a good thing. Companies like that don't have to cry about a "technician shortage" or bemoan the fact that there are so few good technicians out there. Good techs beat a path to their door.

    Firing someone for asking a question is crazy. Word gets out on the streets, and who are you going to hire as a replacement?
    I worked for a HVAC company that has a sheet metal superintendent that fits your description to a tee. What a jerkoff. Always condemned employees in front of others and told lies to the other workers to try and get us to fight amongst ourselves. His domain collapsed when all of us got together and refused to provide any information other than specific job situation questions. Boy, did he get pissed...

    There were many long term employees there- they all quit. The word is out on the street, amd they are having an impossible time keeping sheet metal mechanics now.

    The owner of the company has the mentality that you described. I actually heard him say that "We (sheetmetal guys) are a dime a dozen".

    He has spent a few dollars lately, yet has no reliable help because of the super...

    As an employee, I realize that a company will eat up their profit margin on jobs if they continually need to bring in fresh blood and retrain them on their ways of doing things.

    The company actually does good sheet metal work and they have (had) a good reputation, but the super is on the bonus program. He and the owner are greedy...

    Oh well. They will get what they deserve.

    That particular outfit has been the absolute worst that I have worked for- bar none.

    Excluding the current employer, the others have had many of the same viewpoints- just not so blatant and abusive.

    Kinda difficult to get customers to stop viewing us as "overpaid laborers" when the companies feel the same way....
    Proper Prior Planning Prevents Piss Poor Performance

    "There is hardly anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse and sell a little cheaper, and the people who consider price only are this man's lawful prey. It's unwise to pay too little.
    When you pay too much, you lose a little money -- that is all. When you pay too little, you may lose everything, because the thing you bought was incapable of doing the thing it was bought to do.

    The common law of business balance prohibits paying a little and getting a lot -- it can't be done. If you deal with the lowest bidder, it is well to add something for the risk you run. And if you do that, you will have enough to pay for something better."

    John Ruskin


  5. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    OZ Aka SW Florida
    Posts
    1,830
    Thanks for the input.
    It makes me feel better that I am not the only one who thinks that way, I was reading a article, It took a survey of what job's people would like to work in, out of 500 possible positions, hvac / ref came in at 473 on the list.
    In ten years, there will be nothing but long hair, dope smokeing, tatoo drunk's, applying for work.
    They ask me all the time, when I go to work in placeses, like "how long does it take to learn your work" or " did you go to school for your trade" and "how long before I make the big bucks".
    Sorry Venting......
    Refrigeration...Finding the Wright Wrench to pound in the correct..Screw

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Rockhill South Carolina
    Posts
    370
    You can always tell them to go F*%k themselves,there is always one A%% hole in every bunch who will try to make you miserable but one must draw a line and be confident enough in your skills to either a be fired or b find a better job.Their is such alarge shortage of techs in a few years it will be a techs market and we will be able to name our price,friggin losers.

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