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  1. #27
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Central NJ Area
    Posts
    870
    Quote Originally Posted by fordrules View Post
    Fluke 902, 87, T5-1000, and 52II. I use the 902 for most electrical troubleshooting.
    The 902 is not good for resistance readings in my opinionn and I would not use it for anything except to check for open or closed circuits.

  2. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,915
    I retired my Fluke 337 and 116 to backup duty, and got a Fieldpiece SC56 for my tool bag to save weight and space.

    For temperatures I use a Fluke 52II, and a variety of Fluke probes.
    I'm not aware of any electrical test meters that have a temperature function that is worth using.
    You need a dedicated temperature measuring instrument, that has good compensation for the temperature of the meter, and has filtering against interference from stray signals/voltages.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  3. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    1,394
    I use a Supco. More scales and features then my fluke. Larger LCDs. I bought 4 because they were so cheap and they have lasted for years.

    Fluke assessories are very overpriced.

  4. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,915
    Quote Originally Posted by timjimbob View Post
    I use a Supco. More scales and features then my fluke. Larger LCDs. I bought 4 because they were so cheap and they have lasted for years.
    Supco has no filtering against interference from stray signals/voltages, and questionable compensation for the temperature of the meter.

    Fluke assessories are very overpriced.
    And yet are worth every penny.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  5. #31
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    1,394
    Supco issues are insignificant at 120 volt circuits, but you may be right when checking flame sense circuit.

  6. #32
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Grand Junction, CO
    Posts
    244
    Fieldpiece HS36. Had it 4 years now with no issues.

  7. #33
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Highland Park, CA
    Posts
    88
    I use Fieldpiece LT17A. The hanging magnet comes in handy. Comes with amp clamp to attach to the leads so you can take motor readings with the door on.

  8. #34
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,915
    Quote Originally Posted by timjimbob View Post
    Supco issues are insignificant at 120 volt circuits, but you may be right when checking flame sense circuit.
    I thought you were talking about their thermocouple thermometer, I wasn't even aware they made a multimeter.

    Scary though, trusting my life to an electronic device made by Supco.
    No thanks.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  9. #35
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Paper Street Soap Company
    Posts
    2,304
    Quote Originally Posted by mark beiser View Post
    I retired my Fluke 337 and 116 to backup duty, and got a Fieldpiece SC56 for my tool bag to save weight and space.

    For temperatures I use a Fluke 52II, and a variety of Fluke probes.
    I'm not aware of any electrical test meters that have a temperature function that is worth using.
    You need a dedicated temperature measuring instrument, that has good compensation for the temperature of the meter, and has filtering against interference from stray signals/voltages.
    I have a fluke 52 II also..

    That things been through hell and high water still works though

    I actually liked my old Fluke 52 better.

    You could calibrate it.
    Last edited by Six; 08-02-2012 at 01:23 AM. Reason: Cause I like to party....

  10. #36
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,915
    Quote Originally Posted by Six View Post
    I actually liked my old Fluke 52 better.

    You could calibrate it.
    You can calibrate the 52II using the offset function.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  11. #37
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    3,359
    I just keep a cheap Sears multimeter with me on the job.

    http://www.sears.com/craftsman-multi...p-03482139000P

    It does everything except amps so I have a separate Amp meter.
    This thing does volts,ohms,capacitance & temperature if you have a K-type temp probe for less than thirty bucks. I've got about three or four of them in different tool bags. The temperature part seems to only last about a year but its a handy little tool & if I break it, leave it in an attic or under a house I just buy another one. I learned along time ago not to buy expensive tools if a cheaper one will do the job in the field. Expensive tools are for the guys that are neat & take care of them. That ain't me. I'd go broke if I replaced all the tools I break or lose with top quality ones. To each his own but if you're looking for something cheap that will do the job this one is hard to beat.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Gary
    -----------
    http://www.oceanhvac.com
    An engineer designs what he would never work on.
    A technician works on what he would never design.

  12. #38
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,915
    Quote Originally Posted by garyed View Post
    Expensive tools are for the guys that are neat & take care of them. That ain't me. I'd go broke if I replaced all the tools I break or lose with top quality ones.
    Short of accidentally dropping a tool into a place where it is not retrievable, actually losing a tool is a foreign concept to me.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  13. #39
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    3,359
    Quote Originally Posted by mark beiser View Post
    Short of accidentally dropping a tool into a place where it is not retrievable, actually losing a tool is a foreign concept to me.
    I'll bet you're very well organized. I'm just the opposite. I lose things constantly. I have a bad habit of laying tools on the ground that I just can't break. I lose tools in my own truck. I just found one of my amp meters in my truck that I thought I lost a month ago. I've left everything from a 7 gallon wet vac to an H-10 on the job site & not realized it for days. Stepping on my gauges or meters is a common occurrence. The guys I work with are always making fun of me for either losing or breaking things. So for me, cheap is the way to go.
    Gary
    -----------
    http://www.oceanhvac.com
    An engineer designs what he would never work on.
    A technician works on what he would never design.

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