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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    34,170

    Our ladders make us itch

    You boys run into this. As the fiberglass ages, when we get our little arms against it, it rubs off and makes our little arms itch. Been trying to find a spray coating to put on the fiberglass but haven't. One ladder seller suggested spraying with WD40 to keep the fiberglass from rubbing off on us. Any ideas or products you've used?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Upstate SC
    Posts
    1,439
    Just put another coat of resin on it.

    Sent from my ERIS using Tapatalk 2

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Upstate Central NY
    Posts
    590
    we are going thru this at our office. Sand them down and recoat them.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    7,763
    When this happens I have to wear gloves and then throw the gloves away after using the ladder. I've tried to simply spray it with clear varnish (I think) and that does work for a while.

    I just gave away one of my extension ladders for that very reason but I was also concerned with the fiberglass becomes loose that the capacity of the ladder become less. So I got rid of it for safety reasons.
    "The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers it can bribe the public with the public's own money.
    - Alexis de Toqueville, 1835

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    N.E. Indiana
    Posts
    879
    Quote Originally Posted by jdblack View Post
    Just put another coat of resin on it.

    Sent from my ERIS using Tapatalk 2
    This....

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Columbus Ohio
    Posts
    2,007
    Putting any sort of coating on the ladder, even a clear epoxy, is against OSHA recommendations. You shouldn't put ANYTHING on a ladder that has the appearance of covering up cracks, dings, scratches, scrapes, or fractures.... A lot of job sites wouldn't allow such a ladder to be on the premises.

    I would suggest contacting the manufacturer on advice for flaking fiberglass.
    UA LU189

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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Buffalo NY
    Posts
    3,107
    Quote Originally Posted by zw17 View Post
    Putting any sort of coating on the ladder, even a clear epoxy, is against OSHA recommendations. You shouldn't put ANYTHING on a ladder that has the appearance of covering up cracks, dings, scratches, scrapes, or fractures.... A lot of job sites wouldn't allow such a ladder to be on the premises.

    I would suggest contacting the manufacturer on advice for flaking fiberglass.
    This is true for fiberglass but you can put clear sealer on wood ladders. But who wants to use wood? I would take it out of service and get a new one for safety reasons. They take a beating being outside on the top of he truck all the time. I change mine out about every five years weather it needs it or not. It is better to be safe and spend a few hundred dollars then get hurt and have thousands in medical bills and lost time.


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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cincinnati, Oh
    Posts
    5,042
    Quote Originally Posted by zw17 View Post
    Putting any sort of coating on the ladder, even a clear epoxy, is against OSHA recommendations. You shouldn't put ANYTHING on a ladder that has the appearance of covering up cracks, dings, scratches, scrapes, or fractures.... A lot of job sites wouldn't allow such a ladder to be on the premises.

    I would suggest contacting the manufacturer on advice for flaking fiberglass.
    Totally agree.

    Baldy, if your ladders are at the age of fiberglass flaking, then they need to be put down.
    The fiberglass falling apart, just tells me it's losing it's structure. Meaning one of these days it's going to crack in half, probably when your at the top of it.

    plus, if it's that old, I doubt it has a legitable sticker on it.

    Replace it. The cost of a new ladder is alot cheaper than risking the OSHA fines and workers comp claims.
    Especially since covering the ladder with a material changes your OSHA fine to WILLFULL violation, which I'm sure you know is alot worse.

    If it's a newer ladder thats flaking, take it back and get a new one.
    "Better tell the sandman to stay away, because we're gonna be workin on this one all night."

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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    1,813
    This subject is getting a lot of ATTENTION.

    Has job site safety co ordinator come around and check everyones ladders this morning , 2 sprinkler installers were told to get replacement ladders as theirs had signs of blooming, deterioration of exposed fiberglass.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    somewhere between here and there
    Posts
    478
    metal ladders?

    i use a double sided metal ladder made from falcon ind. in canada.....best ladder ever built, mine is 15 yrs old and still going strong!!!!


    Please, Please Please......keep the Factory Smoke in the Wires!!!!!


    Is it Rum'Oclock yet???

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    S.E. Pa
    Posts
    6,191
    I use aluminum ladders. As a retired paramedic, I am acutely aware of the hazards of electrocution so you will never find my ladders near any type of utility lines. I don't trust phone and cable lines. When I absolutely must work close to power lines, I have the utility wrap the lines at no charge. I find the extra weight of fiberglass is not justified for ladders handled many times daily. When a ladder is placed on a jobsite and left in place for day on end, then I consider that an adequate trade off. I've seen more windows and trim damaged by heavy unweildy fiberglass ladders than aluminum. Same for back injuries. If you attach stand-offs on the third rung down, it makes a fiberglass ladder too unweildy for me even without wind.

    Yes, if your fiberglass ladders are shedding they are dumpster bait. Saw them in half lengthwise so no one can dumpster dive them and sue you when they get injured by fall or get an infection from a splinter.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Southwest
    Posts
    114
    In the hotter areas, you only get a few years out of them, then toss them. Its not worth re-coating them. We cut them into pieces.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,670
    Aluminum ladder here.

    Mine has been around for a long time.

    Fiberglass step ladders are OK, but I prefer aluminum extension ladders.

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