Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 40 to 47 of 47
  1. #40
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    nebraska
    Posts
    1,629
    Thanks for the update.
    The big box hardware stores often have R25 unfaced fiberglass batts on sale. I think our 1000 square foot home took 30ish bundles. There isn't anything fun about rolling out fiberglass in a 130+ degree attic though. Sealing all the wire,plumbing and duct penetrations is an important step before laying the insulation. Payback takes a long time so if you have to foot the bill it's not going to pay off in a rental home unless you plan on dealing with that landlord for another 10 years.

  2. #41
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by martyinlincoln View Post
    Thanks for the update.
    The big box hardware stores often have R25 unfaced fiberglass batts on sale. I think our 1000 square foot home took 30ish bundles. There isn't anything fun about rolling out fiberglass in a 130+ degree attic though. Sealing all the wire,plumbing and duct penetrations is an important step before laying the insulation. Payback takes a long time so if you have to foot the bill it's not going to pay off in a rental home unless you plan on dealing with that landlord for another 10 years.
    I was thinking more along the lines of that stuff they blow into the attic. I certainly cannot do it at any rate. I checked at 5:20, and the indoor is at 80 whilst the outdoor temp is 105. The indoor temp will not start to drop below 80 until after midnight. I lived in a townhouse before I lived here, and whilst my air would run all afternoon there, by 7:30-8:00 it would start to cycle on and off because the outdoor temp would start to drop. I know the townhouse was not much better insulated than this duplex, and I know I had better temps than this the last three years. I have the most gosh awful headache you can imagine right now. : (

  3. #42
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    nebraska
    Posts
    1,629
    Was the townhome sided and the duplex brick by any chance? Brick takes a looooong time to cool off.

  4. #43
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by udarrell View Post
    Well, I gave U ways at posts; #4 #13 #22 #24; to find out if the equipment is way under performing.

    It is not difficult to find a thermometer & humidity gauge with which to log the data for us to analyze.

    If it were me, it would be done in a few New York Minutes...
    I am going to try to do it. I am older, retired, and I get out very, very little, maybe just twice per month to do grocery shopping. I am not in good health, and I do not have air conditioning in my vehicle, so I am not eager to go out at all from July through September each year.

    I think shophound is right that no matter how good a tenant I am, and no matter how helpful I am to this landlord, he is always going to do the least he can do, and maintenance will always be an issue. I have been watching CL for ads for another place, but to be honest, of all the landlords I have known in my life, I have only had one that was really very good. The rest were more like this one.

    I recall many, many years ago telling a friend who was very unhappy in her marriage that perhaps she should just divorce him. She replied that it was her second marriage, and she had found that divorcing and remarrying only resulted in trading one set of problems for another. I think the same applies to rental properties and landlords. It is almost a certain bet that if I move, I will likely end up with another landlord just as bad and maybe even worse. Believe it or not, I have had worse. This is the downside, or one of them, to leasing instead of owning.

    I do not think I mentioned this, but I went to look at a property one evening two or three weeks ago. The owner, an older woman, told me that it was a 2 bedroom, one bath duplex with a yard, and it was nearer the university than I am now, with central heat and air, and it leased for $50 less per month than I now pay. She said it even had a garage that was shared with the other tenant. It sounded far to inexpensive, especially given the location, but I thought I should take a look. You never know what you might find. Her maintenance man was going to show it to me the next morning, but I drove over that night just to get an idea of the neighbourhood and the outside of the house. He told me he was replacing all of the plumbing in the bathroom and in the kitchen because it had not been updated since the 1940s. He said it needed to be painted, and he hoped the owner would have that done. He also said the lino in the bathroom and kitchen needed to be replaced. It would not be ready for a few weeks. I do not/cannot move in this heat, so I was glad of it.

    Well, I was most pleased with the neighbourhood. It was much nicer than my own in fact. Most of the little houses looked quite well maintained, and the yards were all lush with mature landscaping. For a moment I thought I had possibly stumbled upon a really good deal.

    Finally, I came upon the house. I knew I should not have gotten my hopes up the moment I saw it. It must have been the open sore of the neighbourhood. First of all, it had pot holes in the driveway! I never saw anything like it in my life. The backyard looked like a very small prison yard. It obviously was less than half the size of the duplex I now lease, too. As for the garage, I have heard of overs-sized garages, but this look more like an under-sized garage. Moreover, it looked like it would collapse given one good, stiff breeze.

    I met a very young man who was leaving the property as I walked up, and he told me he had recently leased the front unit which was a one bedroom. I asked him about the back unit, and he told me it was awful. He said he worked in painting and decorating and had already completely painted the inside of his unit because it had lime green walls. He said the owner wanted a quote from him to paint the back unit, but he was sure she would not accept it. It was dark so I could not see the woodwork on the outside of the house very well, but he said it literally had not been painted in decades. The front "yard" was little more than scrub land. I would be surprised if she could get $100 a month for that place, much less $600. Needless to say, I canceled the appointment to see the inside.

    On the way back home, I saw another duplex just down the block with a For Lease sign in the yard. This one looked quite nice from the outside, and the lawn was very lush and green. There was mature shrubbry, too. The sign said 2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, and a small extra room. I called the number immediately and left a voicemail. A man returned my call the next day. Unfortunately, it leases for $175 more per month than I now pay, plus utilities, which included gas, water, and electric. I pay electric and water where I am now. I just cannot swing that much extra per month for rent no matter what I try to cut down on, and there is precious little I can cut down on in the first place---I only eat one meal per day as it is. The fact of the matter is that it is very difficult to find anything decent at my price point, which is why I have put up with a lot of aggravation here for the last four years. I know a lot of renters out there reading this will understand exactly what I am talking about.

    It is 105 out there right now and 80 in here, and I have one of the worst headaches you can imagine. Finally had to remove my shirt and socks. I KNOW it was not like this any other summer I lived here.

  5. #44
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    11,302
    I would keep looking. Lots of rental property in Fort Worth. You just might hit on the right combination: good landlord, nice neighborhood, affordable rent, decent house or apartment with a kickbutt a/c system.

    Your other choice is to hire a good a/c company and not say boo about it to the landlord. Problem then is finding a good a/c company willing to go along with that. Can be a real sticky wicket.
    • Electricity makes refrigeration happen.
    • Refrigeration makes the HVAC psychrometric process happen.
    • HVAC pyschrometrics is what makes indoor human comfort happen...IF the ducts AND the building envelope cooperate.


    A building is NOT beautiful unless it is also comfortable.

  6. #45
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    nebraska
    Posts
    1,629
    JT have you looked into a retirement complex? Can't say for your area but here they're some nice,well maintained one bedroom apartments where rent is based on income.

  7. #46
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    21
    Yes, Shophound, my choices are very limited. He does not care if I get an air conditioning company to come out. He just refuses to pay for any repairs. Thanks for the words of encouragement.

  8. #47
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    21
    I have thought of it, Marty, but I moved here from a pretty nice townhouse because I wanted more room and a little yard. I have a lot of advantages to living in a duplex over an apartment. Even if I wanted to do that now, I have some serious downsizing to do before I could make the transition. Thanks for the suggestion, though. Nice to know there are decent folks out there.

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event