Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    35
    My builder and I are having trouble finding a knowledgeable and experienced installer to put together an ERV system for my new house. Most people we speak to have never worked with them and we are worried that it will be installed improperly. Because I have an extremely tight house (spray foam, etc) It is a very important component of the HVAC system.

    I am in the Gaithersburg, Laytonsville area zip 20882

    Current Installed System:
    Trane XL-16i Two Stage Downstairs
    Trane XL-16i Two Stage Upstairs zoned
    Trane Variable Speed/Multi Stage Furnaces

    We were looking into the 200CFM Honeywell ERV unit. Suggestions??

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
    Posts
    6,645
    Consider alternative ventilating devices for an air tight home in Maryland. ERVs take out as much air as they introduce. You have several devices in you new home that require make-up air to function. The clothes drier, kitchen hood, bath fans, central vac, and gas heating appliances use make-up air to function. Using make-up air ventilation is a much better concept for air tight homes with these various exhaust devices. During wet weather with low cooling loads, supplemental dehumidifications is required to maintain <50%RH while providing fresh air ventilation. Several whole house ventilating dehumidifiers including Honeywell are available to provide make-up air ventilation on a occupancy schedule. Providing fresh dry air during occupancy takes care of IAQ and allows the exhaust devices to function. Whole house dehumidifiers are able to maintain <50%RH without any a/c operation regardless of outdoor temperatures. This means you will be able to use t-stat temp. set-up when the home is routinely unoccupied for for 10 hours per day or weeks at a time. This concept has potiential for great energy savings.
    I work for Ultra-Aire/Santa Fe. TB

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    253
    I was on the fence about and ERV and decided not to go with one although adding it in is not a problem. I have an ICF house with a spray foam attic - the house appears to be pretty tight based on a blower door test. We havent had any air quality issues that I can tell. We seem to get enough fresh air between opening the doors for the dogs, running the bathroom fans for showers, and running the clothes dryer. Ideally an ERV tied into the bathrooms would eliminate running fans that suck outside air into the house. The clothes dryer, however, does the same thing. In retrospect I wish I had designed the house to have the washer and drier in the garage.

    Originally posted by smiddleton
    My builder and I are having trouble finding a knowledgeable and experienced installer to put together an ERV system for my new house. Most people we speak to have never worked with them and we are worried that it will be installed improperly. Because I have an extremely tight house (spray foam, etc) It is a very important component of the HVAC system.

    I am in the Gaithersburg, Laytonsville area zip 20882

    Current Installed System:
    Trane XL-16i Two Stage Downstairs
    Trane XL-16i Two Stage Upstairs zoned
    Trane Variable Speed/Multi Stage Furnaces

    We were looking into the 200CFM Honeywell ERV unit. Suggestions??

    Thanks

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
    Posts
    6,645
    Originally posted by tuccillo
    I was on the fence about and ERV and decided not to go with one although adding it in is not a problem. I have an ICF house with a spray foam attic - the house appears to be pretty tight based on a blower door test. We havent had any air quality issues that I can tell. We seem to get enough fresh air between opening the doors for the dogs, running the bathroom fans for showers, and running the clothes dryer. Ideally an ERV tied into the bathrooms would eliminate running fans that suck outside air into the house. The clothes dryer, however, does the same thing. In retrospect I wish I had designed the house to have the washer and drier in the garage.

    Tight homes on non-windy moderate temp days are stagnate regarding fresh air ventilation. This not a desired condition. You need to change the air in your home every 4-5 hours to pruge indoor pollutants and renew the oxygen. That clothes drier may be saving your life. A healthy home needs fresh air when occupied, air filtering to keep air and equipment clean, and <50%RH to prevent the growth of biologicals(mold/dust mites/bacteria) inside your home. This healthy, comfortable, and relatively inexpensive. TB

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