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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    63

    A-coils Upside Down

    I once had a contractor that actually installed my A-coil upside down. He said that the previous contractor had installed it upside down with the drip pan on top! The previous contractor had made his own drip pan to put under the coil, and that had corroded, disintegrated, and leaked water all over the downstairs ceiling drywall. A short time after he reinstalled the coil, it leaked again. This time water was getting blown around the drip pan. He remedied this, but when he wouldn't pay for the drywall damage, I moved on to another contractor. Good thing, because I then learned that the original contractor actually had the coil installed correctly, and my contractor had reinstalled it upside down. It turns out that when using this A-coil in a Carrier downflow unit, you were supposed to install it with the drip pan on top, and provide your own drip pan on the other side, just as the original contractor had done, and my contractor had "corrected".

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Houston,Tx.
    Posts
    15,847
    Quote Originally Posted by brucezas View Post
    It turns out that when using this A-coil in a Carrier down-flow unit, you were supposed to install it with the drip pan on top..
    Were are you at were water runs uphill?
    __________________________________________________ _______________________
    “Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards". - Vernon Law

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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    63
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Bill View Post
    Were are you at were water runs uphill?
    The coil was designed for an upflow unit, but you could use it in a downflow unit by turning the coil around, which put the drain pan on top, and then providing your own drain pan at the bottom. That was Carrier's official recommendation.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Western, MO
    Posts
    871
    I'm confused. Was the wrong coil put in to start with?

    jim
    Common sense isn't very common anymore.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    63
    Quote Originally Posted by jim147 View Post
    I'm confused. Was the wrong coil put in to start with?
    No, Carrier specified that it could be used in either an upflow unit, or in a downflow unit by turning it around. It's just that the drip pan was mounted to be used in an upflow. So you had to provide your own drip pan to use it for downflow.

    This must throw a lot of contractors for a loop if they come across it.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    North East Ohio
    Posts
    769
    Other than this not making any sense, is there a point to this?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    63
    Quote Originally Posted by NCHeat View Post
    Other than this not making any sense, is there a point to this?
    Other than being an amusing anecdote, I think the point is that if it doesn't make sense, it's probably something that contractors would want to learn about. This A-coil was probably installed in the 70s. It's an idea that was apparently phased out by Carrier. My second contractor knew about it, but others do not. What doesn't make sense?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    5,367
    -Top
    -/\
    /--\ Correct

    -Top
    \--/
    -\/ Incorrect

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    63
    Quote Originally Posted by hvacrmedic View Post
    -Top
    -/\
    /--\ Correct

    -Top
    \--/
    -\/ Incorrect
    Is that regardless of whether the air goes top to bottom or bottom to top?

    All I know is that I had a coil with a drip pan on both sides. I had it in each of the above orientations in the same downflow unit during different time periods, and they both worked. As it was explained to me, it came with one of the drip pans, and if you wanted to use it in a downflow configuration, then you were to turn it over so that the drip pan was on the top, and provide your own drip pan.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    3,467
    OP hasn't a clue what he's talking about.
    Drain pan for coil goes on bottom for upflow or downflow- period.
    Oh- and I've been doing this since the late 60's.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    63
    Quote Originally Posted by precision hvac View Post
    OP hasn't a clue what he's talking about.
    Drain pan for coil goes on bottom- period.
    Oh- and I've been doing this since the late 60's.
    First of all, I said that there was a drip pan on the bottom. Obviously, or where would the water go? I owned this unit. I was there when the contractor said, "the A-coil is upside down, look, the drain pan is on the top". I saw it with my own eyes, and there was a pan on the top. There was a smaller disintegrating drip pan at the bottom that almost looked like it was homemade. The contractor said that he was flipping this around to use the drain pan that had been on the top. This was then on the bottom. I watched him as he painfully made adjustments to this pan to keep the water from going around it. The unit cooled both before and after he made the change. When I described this later to an hvac owner, he told me that the original configuration I saw with the second drip pan provided by the installer was how this particular coil was supposed to be installed. He said "this wasn't the greatest idea that Carrier ever had". If you've been installing these since the 60's then you should know what this guy was talking about. How could I not know what I'm talking about when I'm just relating exactly what I saw and what I was told?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    352
    The coil should be installed in the upright ("A" direction, not "V") with the drain pan on the bottom. The Furnace is the only thing that your reverse or install upside-down... See installation manual.

    http://www.managemylife.com/mmh/lis_...L/L0211040.pdf
    You can call me Sam

    It should be a crime to be a mechanical engineer in San Diego
    Summer Design Temperature: 83 F Dry Bulb ~ 69 F Wet Bulb (California Climate Zone 7)

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    63
    Quote Originally Posted by hcong View Post
    The coil should be installed in the upright ("A" direction, not "V") with the drain pan on the bottom. The Furnace is the only thing that your reverse or install upside-down... See installation manual.

    http://www.managemylife.com/mmh/lis_...L/L0211040.pdf
    If one were to install it upside down, would you expect any cooling?

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