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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    185
    If I were you I would learn about the following:
    24 volt control wiring
    240 volt circuits
    convectional heat exchange and the refrigeration system.
    Return Air/Supply air/ CFM's and ducting


    Because without the basics it will be so foreign you will likely get very discouraged. And the old techs can judge a techs knowledge very quickly and will humiliate you for not knowing anything. I would also examine an air conditioner and how they are laid out and designed.
    Good Luck

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Omaha NE
    Posts
    109
    Quote Originally Posted by jnsrose View Post
    As stated above READ! Then read some more. As an installer/service guy I am expected to know everything about a piece of equipment I install. When the job takes more then one day I take the install/service manuals home and read them on my time. This gives me a better understanding of the equipment I work with. Take as many classes as you can. Check with supply houses for manufacturer seminars. Remember,You may not get a chance to read on the job because of the fast pace of the job. Ask if you can borrow the manuals for a night and do not forget to return them. You will be surprised how many install/service techs do not read the directions. Congratulations and good luck.
    Thank you, for the advice and the congrats !

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Omaha NE
    Posts
    109
    Quote Originally Posted by John Markl View Post
    You've got that right !!

    Want to go to the head of the class? Be the guy that never calls for help that is already written in the instruction manual.
    I have known many the guy, (including a former boss) that refused to look at an instruction manual.
    Sometimes I go too far the other way, and study a manual too long. I know the clock is ticking and I am standing there, studying the instruction manual, while the other guy is hooking stuff up.
    So, I guess there is a balance that needs to be attained.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Omaha NE
    Posts
    109
    Quote Originally Posted by blazey10 View Post
    Pay close attention to the tech doing the start-ups and filling out paper work. Notice if they really check that breaker size, or if they even confirm amp draw. See who has the best track record in service and installs, be his shadow. See who has the most call backs, stay back! Good luck!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Thank you !

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Omaha NE
    Posts
    109
    Quote Originally Posted by blitz View Post
    I'm assuming if you're a tv engineer you're familiar with electricity and electronics. if you do, you'll do just fine. most of the problem is electrical anyway. and if a switch won't work either electrically it's dead or there's some mechanical force that affecting it. dont' just change it. confirm that you solve the mechanical issue also.
    Yes, I graduated from electronics trade school quite a few years ago. One of the reasons I chose HVAC for my new career (besides it being a growing field) is that I figured I had a head start with my electronic/electrical training.

    Your statement about a "mechanical issue" intrigued me. Are you talking about relays and contacts ?

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Omaha NE
    Posts
    109
    Quote Originally Posted by Joehvac25 View Post
    I would say at first stay out of the way. When I get a trainee I know I'm in for a longer day, if you get something to do, ask how to do it, last guy I had, I would have to redo everything he did pretty soon he was clean up bit*h then laid off. That will happen after a 3 month ride along and still don't know if it's AC or DC lol. Sounds like you will do fine though.
    Uh, I hope, I am not that guy !

    From what I have learned so far, there is not a lot of DC power used in heating and cooling systems.

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Omaha NE
    Posts
    109
    Quote Originally Posted by Sicofthis View Post
    Learn the refrigerant cycle. Four main components and how refrigerant flows through them and the associated states. Also carry a note pad and write down what other techs do and what they tell you. It'd be good to write the name of the person the note came from. That's very useful later on.
    Ah, the refrigerant cycle ! It took me about 6 weeks of class before that started clicking.

    There is a good video on this site that explains the refrigerant cycle, that I look at to keep it fresh in my mind.

    Good advice about the note taking, thanks !

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Omaha NE
    Posts
    109
    Quote Originally Posted by WMG View Post
    If I were you I would learn about the following:
    24 volt control wiring
    240 volt circuits
    convectional heat exchange and the refrigeration system.
    Return Air/Supply air/ CFM's and ducting


    Because without the basics it will be so foreign you will likely get very discouraged. And the old techs can judge a techs knowledge very quickly and will humiliate you for not knowing anything. I would also examine an air conditioner and how they are laid out and designed.
    Good Luck
    Thanks for the reply !

    I know I have a lot to learn, but I do like to learn new things. I suspect I will be eating some humble pie, but that is part of learning anything new.

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,017
    Quote Originally Posted by drkglass01 View Post
    Yes, I graduated from electronics trade school quite a few years ago. One of the reasons I chose HVAC for my new career (besides it being a growing field) is that I figured I had a head start with my electronic/electrical training.

    Your statement about a "mechanical issue" intrigued me. Are you talking about relays and contacts ?
    relays, contacts, safety switches. by mechanical I mean anything that got nothing to do with electricity. based on my experience as long as I know what kind of voltage/current/capacitance/resistance I should get at an electrical device I could do diagnostic on most electrical problems. motor issues will stump me every now and then, but that happened all the time.

    other issues are mechanical. ie burnt contacts/wiring/bugs/rats, plugged orifice/sensing line/filter, not enough airflow, etc.

    oh and 24v will give you a little jolt if you're sweaty. normally it won't.
    Parts Changer Extraordinaire
    ------------------------------------------------------
    Have tools and gauges, will travel.

    RIDGID|YELLOW JACKET|UEI|TESTO|STANLEY|CPS|VETO| KLEIN|MILWAUKEE|MASTERCRAFT|

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