Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 22
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Omaha NE
    Posts
    109

    I start next Monday !

    I just wanted to let you guys know that I have received, and accepted my first job offer in the HVAC industry .

    Since I am a displaced worker (laid off) from my previous occupation (TV engineer) I am working through the Good will, and they have an on the job training program through a large local Heating and air company.

    I was kind of surprised when I went for my interview and the HR person said the ojt program was for sheet metal work, mainly in new construction.

    After talking to me, she decided I would not be happy doing that for very long, as I told her I wanted to eventually get into service and have my own truck.

    Well, it turns out that she had another position open, doing residential replacements. After reading on HVAC-Talk that most guys start with installs, I told her, that sounds great !

    Any tips for a (not a spring chicken) getting started in this business ?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Omaha NE
    Posts
    109
    Also,

    Can you think of any questions I should ask in my orientation, which is next Friday ?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    N.W.Indiana
    Posts
    59
    Getting your foot in the door is the first step. You say your not a "spring chicken", so if you haven't did much physical work in a while start a exercise regime. It can be very physically demanding doing installs.
    Service work is a different animal and you will need new skill sets. Take some HVAC classes. Learn as much as you can. Learn from others, ask questions. Good Luck.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Omaha NE
    Posts
    109
    Quote Originally Posted by 1tonn View Post
    Getting your foot in the door is the first step. You say your not a "spring chicken", so if you haven't did much physical work in a while start a exercise regime. It can be very physically demanding doing installs.
    Service work is a different animal and you will need new skill sets. Take some HVAC classes. Learn as much as you can. Learn from others, ask questions. Good Luck.
    Thanks, 1tonn ! I do exercise regularly and I am hoping that I can keep up with the younger guys. I know a lot of times injuries occur when people become lax with proper technique. I think my mantra will be "work smarter not necessarily harder".

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Cloverdale,Ca
    Posts
    316
    That is great! Congratulations! Take the time to read the install manuals...loaded with information..all of it beneficial to know as a service tech, once you know how it is supposed to work, you can easily tell when it aint doin what it is supposed to do....
    Living the dream !!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Omaha NE
    Posts
    109
    Quote Originally Posted by Makinhole View Post
    That is great! Congratulations! Take the time to read the install manuals...loaded with information..all of it beneficial to know as a service tech, once you know how it is supposed to work, you can easily tell when it aint doin what it is supposed to do....
    Thank you, Makinhole !

    Sounds like good advice.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    275
    Quote Originally Posted by drkglass01 View Post
    Also,

    Can you think of any questions I should ask in my orientation, which is next Friday ?
    what time is break?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    south jersey
    Posts
    1,104
    As stated above READ! Then read some more. As an installer/service guy I am expected to know everything about a piece of equipment I install. When the job takes more then one day I take the install/service manuals home and read them on my time. This gives me a better understanding of the equipment I work with. Take as many classes as you can. Check with supply houses for manufacturer seminars. Remember,You may not get a chance to read on the job because of the fast pace of the job. Ask if you can borrow the manuals for a night and do not forget to return them. You will be surprised how many install/service techs do not read the directions. Congratulations and good luck.
    You need to put the phone down and get back to work!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Sherman, TX
    Posts
    9,441
    Quote Originally Posted by jnsrose View Post
    You will be surprised how many install/service techs do not read the directions.
    You've got that right !!

    Want to go to the head of the class? Be the guy that never calls for help that is already written in the instruction manual.
    Technical incompetence is NOT a sales tool....

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    West of DFW
    Posts
    240
    Pay close attention to the tech doing the start-ups and filling out paper work. Notice if they really check that breaker size, or if they even confirm amp draw. See who has the best track record in service and installs, be his shadow. See who has the most call backs, stay back! Good luck!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,031
    I'm assuming if you're a tv engineer you're familiar with electricity and electronics. if you do, you'll do just fine. most of the problem is electrical anyway. and if a switch won't work either electrically it's dead or there's some mechanical force that affecting it. dont' just change it. confirm that you solve the mechanical issue also.
    Parts Changer Extraordinaire
    ------------------------------------------------------
    Have tools and gauges, will travel.

    RIDGID|YELLOW JACKET|UEI|TESTO|STANLEY|CPS|VETO| KLEIN|MILWAUKEE|MASTERCRAFT|

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Upper Michigan
    Posts
    3,588
    I would say at first stay out of the way. When I get a trainee I know I'm in for a longer day, if you get something to do, ask how to do it, last guy I had, I would have to redo everything he did pretty soon he was clean up bit*h then laid off. That will happen after a 3 month ride along and still don't know if it's AC or DC lol. Sounds like you will do fine though.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Louisiana
    Posts
    666
    Learn the refrigerant cycle. Four main components and how refrigerant flows through them and the associated states. Also carry a note pad and write down what other techs do and what they tell you. It'd be good to write the name of the person the note came from. That's very useful later on.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event