Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 14 to 22 of 22
  1. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    St. Louis
    Posts
    3,491
    A foot in the door is what you have before you. Kick it open and get started.

    I would love to "have" to learn metal as that is the only thing I haven't done on an a typical install.

    I consider myself extremely lucky to have landed in a shop where everyone does everything. You can learn a hell of a lot listening to the senior techs while helping on an install.

    And I know many respected members here would disagree - but getting thrown into service as soon as possible was the best thing that could have happened to me. I was taking a service vehicle home in six months and now consider a full 85% of my no cools and no heats to be routine - though sometimes the environments are weird. Unfortunately that means I now sit stone cold sober waiting for my pager to go off - but that just more money in the bank and only for a week every six weeks or so.

    Go for it...and the best of luck to you.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    syracuse Ny
    Posts
    87
    I started out as an installer then became a service tech. Right now I do it all. I've been know to install a furnace get back to the shop and run service calls most the night. In a small shop that what it takes to pay the bills and keep my pay check coming in.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Sherman, TX
    Posts
    9,441
    Quote Originally Posted by hurtinhvac View Post
    getting thrown into service as soon as possible was the best thing that could have happened to me.
    A lot of that has to do with your "mettle"....or what cloth you're cut out of.

    Dad STARTED with grocery store service, and greenhouse boiler service. Both of those are "emergency", "save the day" types of work. But, that fit his personality. He worked in a TV shop in high school (as I did later), and he was also a volunteer fireman....see the similarities?

    So, yes....IF you have that personality that responds to "all eyes on you" when disaster strikes, you will likely fare well starting out in service.

    However, those types are few and far between.
    Technical incompetence is NOT a sales tool....

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    St. Louis
    Posts
    3,491
    Quote Originally Posted by John Markl View Post
    A lot of that has to do with your "mettle"....or what cloth you're cut out of.

    Dad STARTED with grocery store service, and greenhouse boiler service. Both of those are "emergency", "save the day" types of work. But, that fit his personality. He worked in a TV shop in high school (as I did later), and he was also a volunteer fireman....see the similarities?

    So, yes....IF you have that personality that responds to "all eyes on you" when disaster strikes, you will likely fare well starting out in service.

    However, those types are few and far between.
    I don't know...I get your point, of course; but I didn't and still don't feel my mettle or cloth is anything that special. All those early calls and my present ones were dealt with in school. Even back on the electricity 101 board with the light bulbs representing the compressor, blower, cfm etc. And the relays, sequencers, contactors etc.

    I was quite frankly scared to death. I think it just took that flaming baptism to force me to realize I only had to apply what I learned.

    I dunno...but I'm damn glad it happened.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Pompano Bch, S Fla
    Posts
    57
    Started out as a duct worker and boss asked if I wanted to learn equipment install which, of course, I did. From there I said I wanted to learn service and his reply was "you learn service from install." Didn't make sense at first but it does now. If you can install a complete system then you are well on your way to troubleshooting the crazy things that YOU WILL find while running service. Figuring out the issue is usually the easy part. Explaining the bill to the customer can be far trickier. Especially if your company installed it.
    Good luck. Hope you wind up loving this crazy trade as much as we do.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    West of DFW
    Posts
    240
    I married into the trade. My f-n-l was the owner. He did not give any kind curve for me nor did I expect it. I rolled with punches and traveled the state being a helper in commercial projects. Then one day a lead man was fired! I was told to take over and to fulfill a (already behind deadline)! Best phrase I learned from my supervisors "make it happen!" This was the first time I was pushed outside of my comfort zone and a new "foreman" was born.
    That's how I started, then I started service. Just a new chapter in the career. Point is, getting out of your "comfort zone" and you can find your true calling!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,034
    I would love to know how to make metal plenum. that's the only thing I'm lacking doing resi install. other stuffs I could do, but that one I don't have a mite of confidence.

    was install helper for a bit then jump straight to the fire of service. I would rather do service than install, but knowing how to do it gives you flexibility. and potential side job.... lol some guy will disagree, but I'm just saying.
    Parts Changer Extraordinaire
    ------------------------------------------------------
    Have tools and gauges, will travel.

    RIDGID|YELLOW JACKET|UEI|TESTO|STANLEY|CPS|VETO| KLEIN|MILWAUKEE|MASTERCRAFT|

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    south jersey
    Posts
    1,108
    It is a real good feeling when you are able to start a unit (properly) after you installed it. Also a good feeling when you service a unit and can tell it was installed wrong. Learn both sides as I did. Starting out as installer as stated above will make you a way better service tech in the long run.
    You need to put the phone down and get back to work!

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Chicago area
    Posts
    1,439
    Also, something no one has pointed out yet is that there is seldom enough strait up service calls to provide you with 40 hours a week.

    Most of the time you will be doing maintenance work as a service guy. Which is okay, but can get rather boring.

    I personally would rather do installs then maintenance during the slow seasons, but you take whats available.

    Do yourself a favor and learn both sides of the trade.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event