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  1. #1

    Question on set-up for new pizza restaurant

    Hi. I'm a pizza restaurant franchisee and I'm going to be going into a 1,300 SF stand alone bldg. The landlord has agree to install two 5-ton roof units for me. He has now asked if he can just do one 10-ton instead. My thought was the two makes more sense, because in the winter months (when I don't need to run both on cool), I can just use the fan setting on one to supply my make-up air. Am I off-track? Will it make a difference having one or two? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
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    66,753
    Code requires an interlock between the exhaust and fresh air. So weather one or 2 units, won't change fresh air.
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
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    33,378
    Get a true makeup air unit. Friend has a 1000 sq ft joint in an old building, we have 2 splits totalling 8 tons. Can't heat the place in a cold wave and can't cool it in the summer. No make up air so everything leaks in and keeps the place miserable.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    Paper Street Soap Company
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    2,298
    8 Tons in a 1000 sq foot building ?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
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    66,753
    Quote Originally Posted by Six View Post
    8 Tons in a 1000 sq foot building ?
    Not unusual for some pizza shops to need a ton per 100 sq ft. Even with make up air, the hood and oven radiates a lot of heat. Many ovens are 550 to 650F.
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  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    San Diego, CA
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    352
    Quote Originally Posted by davedmaine View Post
    Hi. I'm a pizza restaurant franchisee and I'm going to be going into a 1,300 SF stand alone bldg. The landlord has agree to install two 5-ton roof units for me. He has now asked if he can just do one 10-ton instead. My thought was the two makes more sense, because in the winter months (when I don't need to run both on cool), I can just use the fan setting on one to supply my make-up air. Am I off-track? Will it make a difference having one or two? Thanks.
    I would highly recommend two units or split the 10 tons into two zones. The reason is because you have two really different cooling and heating demands... dining which varies in amount of people and you have your kitchen which has all those exhaust fans and heat from stoves, ovens, and indoor refrigerators. You want to be able to control the temperatures separately since a hot kitchen might not mean a hot dining area... also you will save energy in the long run since kitchens can be set to 78-80 F while dining rooms should be 74-78 F (depending on how fast you want customers to leave). I only designed one pizza place, but all the subways, burger joints, Mexican restaurants, and 99% of all other food places have two zones, one kitchen and one dining.
    You can call me Sam

    It should be a crime to be a mechanical engineer in San Diego
    Summer Design Temperature: 83 F Dry Bulb ~ 69 F Wet Bulb (California Climate Zone 7)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    352
    Also, you should definitely ask for a load calculation to make sure 10 tons is enough. The reason is there has been restaurants that can't hold even 78 in the dining room when it is packed and when this happens customers feel uncomfortable and it cost them business.

    The load calculation should also include all the outside make-up air that you need to bring in, the heat emitted from all kitchen equipment including refrigerators (yes, they generate heat), dishwashers, ranges, ovens, etc...

    The dining unit load is mostly due to people, about 15 sf per person or based on your chairs count. All the outside air needed for ventilation...
    You can call me Sam

    It should be a crime to be a mechanical engineer in San Diego
    Summer Design Temperature: 83 F Dry Bulb ~ 69 F Wet Bulb (California Climate Zone 7)

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