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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Addison Il.
    Posts
    5

    Trane ac unit identification

    We have an old Trane Model #RAS63A Condensing unit. It is a 3 phase unit does this model # indicate that it is a 6 ton 3 phase unit.It recently had the condensing fan brake away and damage the condenser. We want to replace it but I want to know for sure the size. We have 2 of this units that are in our Masonic Hall.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    5,366
    Quote Originally Posted by WayneParis View Post
    We have an old Trane Model #RAS63A Condensing unit. It is a 3 phase unit does this model # indicate that it is a 6 ton 3 phase unit.
    WOW - we are talking dinosaur units here - the mid to late 1960's.

    Impressive that they are still working.

    From the info I have, these were listed as a 5 ton unit. They were attached to air handlers that had 2000 cfm.

    They are showing about 55,000 btuh at 95 OAT, 87 DB, 67 WB with a matching indoor coil.
    Instead of learning the tricks of the trade, learn the trade.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Addison Il.
    Posts
    5
    Thank You very much. Both were working until last week when the one brakect broke and sent the running fan into the coil.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Addison Il.
    Posts
    5
    I have another question. We hired a contractor who installed a 410 condenser and flushed out the line set and evaporator coil. Is it possible to remove all residue from a evap coil. In my opinion it is not . Also since the 410 runs at higher pressures what do you think of trying to use a 40 plus year old coil to run at that pressure. Again I disagree. If memory serves me correctly all the coils were redesigned to run at the higher pressures at the advent of 410 coming on the market . I remember the price increase. Should I request the freon be checked to see if there is contamination of old r22 in the system. Or am I stressing over nothing. Will a 40 year old coil with a new 410 txv valve handle the new pressures? Thanks in advance.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    5,366
    Techs do it all the time, and usually don't have any issues.

    Any coil has the potential to leak with age, but as well made as things were back in the 1960's, I would think this coil could withstand the higher pressures as long as it didn't have any current leaks.

    Unless there was a compressor burn out from the old condenser, a good flush (if you choose), nitro purge, and proper evacuation should be enough to prepare the system for R410A.

    Any small amounts of mineral oil left in the system should not be a problem.

    I would be more concerned with the lack of capacity and efficiency of this mis-matched system by using an old 1960's coil with a new 13+ SEER condenser.

    A matched system is alway best.
    Instead of learning the tricks of the trade, learn the trade.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Addison Il.
    Posts
    5
    thank you!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    67,708
    Quote Originally Posted by rundawg View Post

    I would be more concerned with the lack of capacity and efficiency of this mis-matched system by using an old 1960's coil with a new 13+ SEER condenser.

    A matched system is alway best.

    Sure aren't getting anywhere close to 13 SEER using the old coil.

    That old coil is made of thicker copper then new ones are.
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