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  1. #1

    Super-Freeze 22a Refrigerant

    Super-Freeze 22a Refrigerant - R22 Freon Drop-in Replacement - 30 lb Equivalent

    Anyone using the Super-Freeze 22a Refrigerant ?

    What you take on it?

    Any cons?


    regards,
    Kelvin

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    West Chester, PA
    Posts
    511
    There are a number of these 22 replacement blends. Without even having tried or heard much feed back from people who have tried them, my major objection is that with so many alternatives, what happens when i go out to a service call and the unit has been charged with new-22 or 22a or duponts new one...if i don't know and i charge 22 thats a problem. if i do know but don't have new22 or whatever is in the system, that's a problem. I'm for selling 410a equipment to replace r22 equipment whos repairs outweigh the cost of a new system. If they want a band-aid then it's gonna be an expensive one and that again is incentive to upgrade equipment.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    1,730
    Penny wise, pound foolish is all I can say.


    22a is a hydrocarbon. Made from propane, butane, isobutane and ethane. Blend proportions depend on which refrigerant its supposed to replace.

    Keep in mind that "a" suffix doesn't always mean HC. You need to watch out when the "a" pops in where they don't normally belong, like 12a, 22a, 502a. Its better to write as HCFC-22, HFC-410a to avoid confusion.

    Super-Freeze's website describes it as "zeotropic" blend but does not state the composition or the glide, so the safe assumption is that refrigerant fractionates and gets ruined like those blends with 12 + degrees of glide. Cheap to fill, can't be topped off...


    That stuff is sold as "replaces 134a, but also works in R12 system" to exploit the loophole in SNAP that HC may not be offered as CFC/ODS replacement, however there's no authority on use as an alternative to non-ODP refrigerant.

    HC is one of the expensive equipment to service. Here is what you will need:

    Recovery machine specifically approved for use with flammable refrigerant. Most HVAC/R machines specifically advise against use with flammable stuff.

    You maybe able to get one from Europe or Japan where safety standards are fairly good (unlike China) and R600a(isobutane) is used legally for refrigerators. Those fridges aren't just R134a machines filled with HC-600a. The light switches and electrical components are explosion proof type like the kind used on laboratory freezers meant for storing ether.


    Venting remains illegal.

    Dedicated recovery cylinder.

    I don't know the technical legality, but if it's straight HC, it can be burned off in a barbecue grill with no adverse impact. If it's HCFC-22/HC22 blend from Joe Home Owner topping off, it's going to have to go back to your wholesaler as tainted refrigerant which will likely cost you $$$.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    The Woodlands, Texas
    Posts
    64
    From a liability standpoint, I would steer clear of it.

    R-410a consists of a blend of R-32 and R-125. R-32 is SLIGHTLY FLAMMABLE and it is an amazing refrigerant. R-125 was added to it (50/50 blend) to reduce its flammability but at a detriment to efficiency.

    R-32 is slightly flammable with a GWP of 650ish.
    R-22a is highly flammable.
    R-125 reduces efficiency and it has a GWP of over 3000.

    Adding R-125 to R-410a, reduces efficiency and INCREASES its global warming potential.

    R-32 will one day replace R-410a (in my opinion because it is only slightly flammable) but the whole issue of safety regarding the use of flammable refrigerants needs to be assessed first.

    I remember reading papers on the amazing qualities of pure R-32 but everyone was scared out of their minds because it was only slightly flammable. No one wants to risk it. Spend a little more and cover your rear.

    Tony

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    The Woodlands, Texas
    Posts
    64
    This was also why I was looking at getting a refrigerant analyzer... Most notably, Bacharach's PurCheck Pro.

    Instantly you know if you have the correct refrigerant, how pure it is, if there are any non condensables, or if there are any hydrocarbons in the system.

    Tony

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    1,730
    Quote Originally Posted by ADillon View Post
    the unit has been charged with new-22 or 22a or duponts new one...if i don't know and i charge 22 thats a problem. if i do know but don't have new22 or whatever is in the system
    This was a constant problem in automotive service shortly after R12 was phased out. Use of electronic refrigerant analyzer to prevent ruining the shop's refrigerant is part of the technical procedure in a training video made by 4 Seasons.

    In automotive service, the shop can use recycled refrigerant in anyone vehicle so recovered gas is an asset.

    The only way to legitimately and safely service such is to use a recovery machine designed for flammable gas and pump it into your dedicated tainted gas recovery cylinder containing unknowns bound for disposal.

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