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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Tampa Fl
    Posts
    105

    Do you agree or not?

    The technician who has the ability and desire to fine tune equipment can charge extra for his labor and will always be in demand by the public.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    317
    No
    In reality the tech can only do and charge what the customer is willing to pay for.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Cal
    Posts
    1,596
    If you like the saying " good, fast, cheap...pick two"you have a statistical demand of 33% at best. Its probably much lower than that though.

    Creating the perception, marketing to the right/qualified customers, weeding out the bad catch, and then finally satisfying the expectations you created is a big chore. You still have the internal company bs to deal with.

    Are you trying to sign up companies for a franchise, one that leads to the land of milk and honey?

    If you're asking about employees, no. Social faults like obedience, back stabbing, and foot in mouth disease will undermine talent.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Sherman, TX
    Posts
    9,441
    Quote Originally Posted by anacdoctor View Post
    The technician who has the ability and desire to fine tune equipment can charge extra for his labor and will always be in demand by the public.
    I'd have to agree. My Dad is 76, and still in demand.....and not just for HVAC.

    But he understands how things work, and is always willing to go the extra mile.
    Technical incompetence is NOT a sales tool....

  5. #5
    I'll agree to a point on all accounts. I've seen to much back stabbing to get beyond the human element though.
    Seems that it always catches up to them in the long run. Its only if you are willing to ride that wave.

    But to charge more... people want cheap. Actually people want free. I've heard a story of a tech cleaning out a condensor unit,, just sprayed it down and got er' clean. The home owner comes out and states I am not going to pay you for that,, I could have done that. In which the tech states... but you didn't and I did.
    Heres my bill sir.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    GTA, ON
    Posts
    1,244
    Most people want free and that is true. A quality tech will still be able to charge more if he establishes a good word-of-mouth reputation with the right crowds over the years. Hint: Not those that regularly shop @ Wally's World. One of my instructors is exactly that type and he sure as h*** ain't starvin'.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    185
    Word of Mouth reputation is a very reliable way of getting business or not. So if a service tech. has an outstanding reputation for doing an outstanding job he will be noticed and in-turn make the company higher profits and can demand a higher wage. Think if a HVAC business owner would let a service technician with zero call backs go to another company for a small raise?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Memphis TN
    Posts
    1
    Its all about your Integrity and if you take pride in your work or not.I give a lot of freebies and the return is ten fold.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    West Chester, PA
    Posts
    511
    I wish i could agree...but i just don't think it's true.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    West Chester, PA
    Posts
    511
    Two quick examples from a employee stand point (and if your looking at it from a business stand point, i stall sadly have to say that i can't 100% agree with the statement) about 6 years ago i was between jobs. I had a number of interviews lined up. One of the interviews was with service experts which if you don't know is a company affiliated with lennox which buys up different contractors throughout the country - they are large and claim to be service oriented. I aced their service test, held about 6 nate certs at the time and had a good reputation and list of references. They offered me the job but didn't want to pay me what i wanted. When i asked what their top guy made they told me that their top paid tech was a tune up guy right out of school. He had the higest hourly rate because he sold the most stuff (humidifiers, air cleaners, service contracts, etc.) he was not capable of troubleshooting or making sealed system repairs. In all he was coompletly green but received the highest pay becasue instead of fixing problems he sold his way out of them. This is not an example of a tech who took the time to properly repair and fine tune equipment. In fact he barely knew what he was doing but he was their top guy. This is the way companies are going (this wasn't the only company who displayed this type of mentality during my search for a new employer)
    and it certainly is not in favor of a highly skilled technician who displays intergrity. So...until there is a giant backlash from this type of behaviour and homeowners begin to understand the importance/impact that their home mechanical systems have on their wallet and what the difference between a tech and a sales guy are, the market will not liekyl facilitate a guy who takes the time to educate himself, does it right and expects to be paid right for it. It's sad and i'm not saying it's 100% accross the board but that s what i see more often thatn not...

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Sherman, TX
    Posts
    9,441
    While some shops employ "sales techs", the fact remains that every shop needs real service techs as well.
    Technical incompetence is NOT a sales tool....

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    West Chester, PA
    Posts
    511
    of course they do...they just don't pay them as much becasue there is less short term money in a repair then a sale. and these people can't see past their own noses to recognize that good service means sales in the long term and continued business where as 'sales techs' means sales in the short term and maybe lost business in the long term. These shops have to have a good service tech but he will likely be underappreciated (he doesn't sell as much) and underpaid (he doesn't sell as much) and maybe over worked too...again i'm not happy about this model, i just see it everywhere.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Sherman, TX
    Posts
    9,441
    Quote Originally Posted by ADillon View Post
    of course they do...they just don't pay them as much becasue there is less short term money in a repair then a sale. and these people can't see past their own noses to recognize that good service means sales in the long term and continued business where as 'sales techs' means sales in the short term and maybe lost business in the long term. These shops have to have a good service tech but he will likely be underappreciated (he doesn't sell as much) and underpaid (he doesn't sell as much) and maybe over worked too...again i'm not happy about this model, i just see it everywhere.
    Does a business exist to "fix things" or to generate profit?

    I'm not interested in guys who can't fix what they sell. But, selling is a required practice for financial survival and success.
    Technical incompetence is NOT a sales tool....

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