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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    85

    Condensate pump evacuation tubing

    Hello all,
    What is the proper method for running the tubing to evacuate out of the house through the hole that the lineset goes through? I have had three different methods provided to me by three different HVAC contractors. I don't know which is correct. So what are the correct method(s). I live in PA where the temps drop into freezing for most of winter. Thanks to all the Pros that post!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Northern VA 38 degrees N by 76 degrees W
    Posts
    5,058
    Quote Originally Posted by Unclev View Post
    Hello all,
    What is the proper method for running the tubing to evacuate out of the house through the hole that the lineset goes through? I have had three different methods provided to me by three different HVAC contractors. I don't know which is correct. So what are the correct method(s). I live in PA where the temps drop into freezing for most of winter. Thanks to all the Pros that post!
    What does it serve?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    85
    My original heat pump had the evap coil drain the condensate through a P trap then into a hole in the basement concrete foundation also where the heat pump is located.... (In the basement) There is a lot of Radon around here so they will no longer do that and the only approved method in our area is to evacuate the condesate outdoors. I hope this helps.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Northern VA 38 degrees N by 76 degrees W
    Posts
    5,058
    Quote Originally Posted by Unclev View Post
    My original heat pump had the evap coil drain the condensate through a P trap then into a hole in the basement concrete foundation also where the heat pump is located.... (In the basement) There is a lot of Radon around here so they will no longer do that and the only approved method in our area is to evacuate the condesate outdoors. I hope this helps.
    Condensate from ac is not a problem will only be during summer months, but if there is a humidifier that would run during the winter and would freeze.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    85
    I will not have a built in dehumidifier so I wonder why they are all concerned about freezing? That's what I thought too. After I stop using ac mode in Sept ac wont be used till May again. Why are all worried about freezing????

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Northern VA 38 degrees N by 76 degrees W
    Posts
    5,058
    Quote Originally Posted by Unclev View Post
    I will not have a built in dehumidifier so I wonder why they are all concerned about freezing? That's what I thought too. After I stop using ac mode in Sept ac wont be used till May again. Why are all worried about freezing????
    Not a "D" humidifier a humidifier that ads moisture in the winter. If you do not have then you have no problem pumping outdoors.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    85
    Opps yes I meant to say humidifier.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    4,670
    again, if you ONLY use this set up for the A/C condensate you have no issues.
    The Food Stamp Program, administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, is proud to be distributing the greatest amount of free meals and stamps EVER.
    Meanwhile, the National Park Service, administered by the U.S. Department of the Interior, asks us to "Please Do Not Feed the Animals". Their stated reason for this policy "... the animals become dependent on handouts and will not learn to take care of themselves."
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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    In a boiler room
    Posts
    7,050
    Do you have a gas furnace? If yes. What afue?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    S.E. Pa
    Posts
    6,142

    Cool

    If you have a high efficiency furnace with drainage from a secondary heat exchanger or drainage from a humidifier then you should run your drainage to a slop sink or sump pump. It can drain into the DWV system if there is an air gap to a stand pipe that is trapped. Otherwise, if AC only, it can drain to the exterior without freezing hazard. Also, the condensate may be somewhat toxic or corrosive so be careful where it discharges.

    HTH

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    85
    Thanks again for all the replies.
    I have an all electric heat pump,no furnace so I really don't know what all the fuss is about with these HVAC contractors and the condensate freezing.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    in a house, Appomattox, Va.
    Posts
    3,255
    because later when a humidifier is added......
    Col 3:23


    questions asked, answers received, ignorance abated

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,829
    I live and install both condensing furnaces and HP's with humidifiers way up here in the north country where freezing is a very real problem. Been puttin' condensing furnaces in attics for years, also with humidifiers. With a little thought, it's easy to keep the condensate from freezing. But then again, it seems most techs can't think, I reckon.
    If YOU want change, YOU have to first change.

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