Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 19
  1. #1
    I need to know which dehumidifier to buy. I can't afford the Santa Fe as it costs more than I spend. Is there a cheaper option that won't break the bank when the electric bill comes in?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    100
    Wait for teddy bear.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Tampa, Florida
    Posts
    1,634
    Try going to:
    http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?..._dehumidifiers

    On the right are links to lists of Energy-Star certified dehumidifiers, complete with energy consumption ratings (Liters/Kilowatt-hour). Higher is better, as this means it removes more water while using less energy.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
    Posts
    6,643
    This the current list of rated dehus.
    http://www.energystar.gov/ia/product..._prod_list.xls

    The new Santa Fe Advance 90 pint is about 3X the price, 2X the capacity, 2X the life, half the operating cost and 30% less heating of a typical residential dehu. SFA saves $50-$150 per year. The SFA is ductable and has Merv11 air filter. True some application are best served by resid dehu. Most of our customers have tried cheap dehus before getting the best. Call the factory for dent discount. Dehu promoting TB

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    4H: Hot, Humid Houston H.O.
    Posts
    3,304
    >>Most of our customers have tried cheap dehus before getting the best.

    I won't be contradicting Teddy Bear if I suggest you do the same. You can prove out the benefit of a dehu and may learn it's worth saving up to buy the best -- a cheap lesson if it plays out that way. Then you can donate your cheap dehu to a family member or someone who needs it, or a popular model could be sold on Ebay.

    Recently I tried a Soleus CFM40E rated at 25 pints/day under standard conditions, and liked it (Soleus advertises 40 pints/day but that's a bogus claim compared to standard conditions). Its benefits are cheapness, smallness and quietness. I like the ability to place the dehu close to the source of humidity, without running ductwork. You could do worse than try a small inexpensive dehu or two for a year, then decide the next step.

    If you don't run a drain hose, you will quickly tire of emptying water buckets though.

    Hope this helps -- Pstu


    P.S. I own a Thermastor Santa Fe RX too, like them both.


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    11,808
    Originally posted by panama red
    I need to know which dehumidifier to buy. I can't afford the Santa Fe as it costs more than I spend. Is there a cheaper option that won't break the bank when the electric bill comes in?
    I would end up allowing aesthetics to influence my decision as to which one to buy. You may have a preference for one that comes in the Acapolco shade of gold


  7. #7
    I forgot to say that this will be in the crawl space under the house.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
    Posts
    6,643
    Whats the sqft. of the crawlspace and home, also location? Suggest a minimum of 90 pint/day dehu per 2,500 sqft. A good dehu in the crawlspace will also effect the living space. Cover the earth with plastic and close the vents. TB

  9. #9
    The house is about 1200sf and plastic on ground. It is in East Tennessee. We have closed the vents but I still need a cheaper dehumidifier until I can afford a Santa Fe. Can you recommend one that is suitable.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Huntsville,AL
    Posts
    4,125
    be sure to buy the extended warranty!!!!

    I put a hole thru the block & ran some PE pipe outside for drain --
    harvest rainwater,make SHADE,R75/50/30= roof/wall/floor, use HVAC mastic,caulk all wall seams!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    4H: Hot, Humid Houston H.O.
    Posts
    3,304
    I don't know of any source which can tell us one dehumidifier is more reliable than another, and there aren't many ways to tell us which is best. I suggest you would have OK results by getting something which is Energy Star rated at least, but otherwise I would figure most of the brand names are about the same. I would suggest something 50-65 pint/day from Sears, Maytag, LG, etc. Something from a local dealer where you can drag it back and talk face-to-face if it fails within the warranty period. Anyone have a better idea?

    You may find its watt consumption is close to that of the Thermastor, and I wager it would not last as long, but you could get started for a couple hundred dollars.

    Best of luck -- Pstu


  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    468

    last I checked...

    A Kenmore is a rebadged LG.

    They're not bad, for the breed:

    Energy star certified
    Supposedly operable down into the 40s w/o icing up
    digital humidistat 35-70 %
    conservation settings allowing duty cycle operation
    not too noisy
    easily hosepiped to a drain


    One of the best features is that it remembers its settings after a power blip or outage. This is key since a dehu is typically located out of sight and mind.

    According to the Energy Star list, a Thermastor will remove an extra quart or so of water per kWhr, almost half again as efficient, and that can add up. Dehus are NOT cheap to run. Thermastor looks like a hands-down winner in a whole house application. I will likely include one in my new house. However...

    For a properly sealed crawl space I'd be very careful not to oversize the dehu. I believe, and remember a report somewhere out on the web, that dehus are as rampantly oversized as HVAC units. While a 90 pint Thermastor is an elegant machine, I suspect it would be vastly oversized for a 1200 sf crawl space with even halfway decent sealing.

    I have a 45 pint LG in a small (~250 sf) walkout basement in Florida (a rare room in Florida) and it does a fine job for about 3 kWhr per day, despite substantial infiltration and poorly damproofed CMU walls. Room temp is noticeably higher, perhaps 6-8 degrees. It runs around 85 in summer. It is way oversized (3 kWhr per day amounts to about a 25% duty cycle), but the smaller 25 pint models available are inefficient and prone to icing.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    4H: Hot, Humid Houston H.O.
    Posts
    3,304

    What means oversizing, really

    >>I believe, and remember a report somewhere out on the web, that dehus are as rampantly oversized as HVAC units.

    Sure would be nice if you ever could find that link and share it with us on this board. Perhaps in the IAQ section, if not here in the Res section.

    In the AC business "oversized" has a really bad connotation, related to humidity removal. You cannot slam the practice of oversizing for the same reasons. I believe the downside is 1) paying for a machine larger than you need, and 2) some slight degree of lesser efficiency due to cycling. Since the larger units often cost only a little more than smaller ones, neither reason is a great big one in my opinion.

    The "duty cycle" method of determining right sizing is worthy, but one has to buy and install before they can measure the answer. We don't have the advantage of a well evolved model for prediction, like Manual J for AC. So we guess, but the penalty for guessing wrong on the upside seems modest. Even Thermastor recommends sizing by square footage.

    I really appreciate your opinions and hope you don't mind my submitting contrary ones.

    Best wishes - Pstu


    [Edited by pstu on 08-07-2006 at 12:23 PM]

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event