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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    82

    Anyone use a DSO Nano V2 for testing networks?

    Got one in and I am confused with all the settings as i have never used one of these before(or any oscilloscopes)

    Any help with settings and general ideas on using it would be appreciated!

    thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Edmonton, AB Canada
    Posts
    598
    Quote Originally Posted by Shockwave View Post
    Got one in and I am confused with all the settings as i have never used one of these before(or any oscilloscopes)

    Any help with settings and general ideas on using it would be appreciated!

    thanks!
    Good day Shockwave,

    I cannot guide you specifically on your Nano DSO, there are a number of items that you need to consider for your analysis/testing. For example:

    1. Are you looking at generic electrical waveforms or specific ones (i.e. digital data like serial bit streams like from MS/TP, Modbus, etc or Analog waveforms)?

    2. What is the maximum voltage levels are you looking at? The Nano DSO will have a limit as to what voltages it can read, otherwise damage can result.

    3. Are you looking at line voltages? If so then safety and specialty devices (i.e. isolation transformer) are needed to protect yourself and the equipment.

    4. What signal frequencies are you looking at? Oscilloscopes have limits (i.e. bandwidth) as to what frequencies they can measure... The DSO Nano I think is 1MHz? ... if you are doing serial data streams like MS/TP, N2 bus, Modbus, etc then this is fine as the frequencies here range from just under 10KHz to 100Khz.

    Basic Oscilloscope Control
    The timebase or horizontal axis is the time increment per graticule or increment on the oscilloscope. This axis shows you how the signal changes over a time interval that you select.
    The vertical axis is the amplitude of the signal and is also user selectable in an increment per graticule.
    There should be also be a selection for input coupling... DC means that the signal will be referenced to a ground level or AC meaning that any DC bias is removed.
    Lastly, there will or should be a trigger type and level. Should the scope trigger repeatedly or only one event. The trigger level can be a specific voltage point on the signal or it can be triggered from another signal's event (i.e. a different signal on another probe channel). The number of trigger types will be dependent upon the scope, etc.


    Now, how you use the Oscilloscope for analysis will be completely dependent upon what you are looking for... Are you looking for:
    1. a type of waveform (sinusoid, square wave, Pulse train, etc),
    2. the signal's amplitude or frequency,
    3. the integrity (i.e. shape) of the signal or other params like rise time, etc
    4 harmonics of the signal,
    5. other frequencies present in the signal (like noise),
    6. transient events in the signal (spikes, etc)

    The list is numerous and will affect the setup and requirements of one's scope (i.e. bandwidth, etc). Secondly, remember that the scope can also affect the signal of interest, as the scope probe has impedance as well. In these cases (usually high frequency... i.e. way beyonf 100kHz) specialty (and expensive) probes are needed in order to minimize their impact.

    My suggestion would be to purchase an inexpensive or used signal generator and "play" with your Nano so that you get a handle on how it works and how to set it up for basic analysis.

    Anyway, I hope the above helps!

    Cheers,

    Sam

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