Do you have R22 refrigerant stockpiled and how much? - Page 2

View Poll Results: How many 30 lbs cyls of R22 do you have stockpiled?

Voters
75. You may not vote on this poll
  • None, buy as needed

    16 21.33%
  • 1 or 2

    14 18.67%
  • 3 to 5

    15 20.00%
  • 6 to 10

    9 12.00%
  • 11 to 15

    2 2.67%
  • 16 to 20

    3 4.00%
  • 21 to 25

    0 0%
  • 26 to 30

    3 4.00%
  • 31 to 35

    2 2.67%
  • 36 to 40

    0 0%
  • more than one pallet (one pallet being 40 cyls)

    11 14.67%
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 14 to 26 of 32
  1. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Northwest Illinois
    Posts
    275
    Quote Originally Posted by RBrudi View Post
    Here is an article that my Dad wrote about recycling R22. He has been in the industry over 20 years and has been President of our chapter of RSES. I hope this helps!

    http://library.constantcontact.com/d...12+%282%29.pdf
    Thanks for the article, I find it very helpful, and with R-22 phasing out it's a great idea for us all to recycle everything we can!

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    2,313
    Quote Originally Posted by stay gold jonny View Post
    Does anyone clean their dirty R-22? If so, what is the best way to clean it?
    There are two types of machines... recovery and recycler.
    Recovery is just a pump.

    Recycler uses a series of filters to remove acid and moisture.

    In automotive world, you can recycle refrigerant and introduce it back into anyone's car. In stationary world, the machines its going back to must belong to the same owner.

    Even if they don't allow more production, there's a possibility they might make it like the automotive world. This would allow service contractors and supply houses to use "recycling machines" to scrub and traffic recycled refrigerant without requiring reclamation by EPA certified facility.

    Not that it would surprise me much if this is going already going on even though its not permissible. I know when contractors replace a big unit, they scrap the old one for copper. Who's to say they don't recover and recycle 30 lbs of existing charge and divert it for direct reuse rather than turning in for reclamation?

    This is a technicality thing. If a building has 30 identical condensing units, the refrigerant maybe shared while its an apartment complex, but once its converted to a condo on paper, you can not, because the ownership of equipment belong to each unit owner. In the text of law, this is prohibited, much like running #2 fuel in your diesel truck. I don't believe its enforced as rigorously though.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Northwest Illinois
    Posts
    275
    Quote Originally Posted by ICanHas View Post
    There are two types of machines... recovery and recycler.
    Recovery is just a pump.

    Recycler uses a series of filters to remove acid and moisture.

    In automotive world, you can recycle refrigerant and introduce it back into anyone's car. In stationary world, the machines its going back to must belong to the same owner.

    Even if they don't allow more production, there's a possibility they might make it like the automotive world. This would allow service contractors and supply houses to use "recycling machines" to scrub and traffic recycled refrigerant without requiring reclamation by EPA certified facility.

    Not that it would surprise me much if this is going already going on even though its not permissible. I know when contractors replace a big unit, they scrap the old one for copper. Who's to say they don't recover and recycle 30 lbs of existing charge and divert it for direct reuse rather than turning in for reclamation?

    This is a technicality thing. If a building has 30 identical condensing units, the refrigerant maybe shared while its an apartment complex, but once its converted to a condo on paper, you can not, because the ownership of equipment belong to each unit owner. In the text of law, this is prohibited, much like running #2 fuel in your diesel truck. I don't believe its enforced as rigorously though.
    I know this is the law, it should be more clarified,IMO. As far as enforcement, I cant remember the last time I saw an EPA agent hiding in the bushes!

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    2,313
    Quote Originally Posted by stay gold jonny View Post
    I know this is the law, it should be more clarified,IMO. As far as enforcement, I cant remember the last time I saw an EPA agent hiding in the bushes!
    The question to be resolved is... what's the compliance like in the field? Is it regularly bent like speeding a bit, or strictly followed like not going straight through a red?

    This might just be political thing, however if they're charging standard material rate for R22 that was sucked out of a units that were taken out of service for new systems, it is a serious integrity issue.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    2,313
    to those who have over 1,000 lbs in stock, do you care to share your operation size and how many months/years of safety stock is this?

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    515
    I just grabbed a couple cans out of the cage and noticed we actually have 1000 lbs in 125# cylinders, plus a half pallet of 30's left. We have a dozen HVAC/R service techs in our company. It sounds like a lot of gas, but we're hardly "stockpiling." We normally use around 2 pallets a year of 30's. We are trying to cut back our use, and have been experimenting with the MO99. The large tanks are there in case a grocery store loses a rack or something. I remember 1 time about 3 years ago a store called that we didn't have a service contract with. They had a major blowout on one of there racks and lost I think around 800lbs. It is nice being able to "come to the rescue." We had them up and running the same day.

    I remember hearing stories of wholesalers buying entire semi loads a few years ago when it was $3 a lb. Now THAT'S hoarding! They're probably making a killing on it now.

  7. #20
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    oklahoma
    Posts
    63
    cant poll yet. My company ordered 30 30lb pound jugs this spring. A little more than usually cause their supplier told them 22 was also rationed to 2 30lb jugs a week. That stock is pretty much gone now. And around here the price nearly tripled!

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    nebraska
    Posts
    1,627
    We had well over 1500 pounds that was purchased before the last big price hike and it will be gone by the end of summer. Three service techs and a service manager who also runs when things get swamped. Two change out trucks also along with several remodel/construction vans.

    Three to four dry shipped units cleans out one 30 pound drum. Throw in half a dozen leak repairs a week that take 2-10 pounds each along with those that just want a gas-n-go and your looking at 100+ pounds a week. Seven vehicals with a jug and a partial ties up 250-300 pounds just in truck stock. It all adds up fast.

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    tenn
    Posts
    164
    price droped 100.00 a 30 pound in tenn
    birdman

  10. #23
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    11,937

  11. #24
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    1,733
    I can only figure there is plenty of 22 available at the moment. Refrigerant company I buy from emailed me with some
    great skid pricing, so I purchased a skid of 22, and a mixed skid of 134a, and 410a. However I did just get a email
    saying prices are going up due to additional phase out from the epa for 22 at the start of the year.

    Either situations change fast, or this guy is a good salesman.

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    2,313
    Quote Originally Posted by edward301 View Post
    I can only figure there is plenty of 22 available at the moment. Refrigerant company I buy from emailed me with some
    great skid pricing, so I purchased a skid of 22, and a mixed skid of 134a, and 410a. However I did just get a email
    saying prices are going up due to additional phase out from the epa for 22 at the start of the year.

    Either situations change fast, or this guy is a good salesman.
    It's a guessing game like any other commodity. I speculate that seasonal factors play a big role as user demographics change. I'd think that primarily refrigeration stuff like 404A stays fairly constant while space cooling refrigerant sees seasonality.

    I can only see 22 usage for heating season to go down as the existing heat pumps and refrigeration systems are replaced. I think it makes sense for annual gas-and-go service to go down faster in areas with more annual cooling hours with the need to curtail power cost. In milder areas with only a 200 or so cooling hours, I think seasonality is more significant.

    410A seasonality will likely go down when heat-pumps become more common, but I don't see new R22 heat pumps getting put online.

    Retail stores clearance out BBQ stuff even if they're not something that will change next summer like fashion because they don't have unlimited storage space and maybe they're just trying to free up room?

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    NORTHERN
    Posts
    989
    what'd r 12 do?

    heard the same,
    and POW!

    Heard of OEM engineering: will be around...
    but
    @ $$$ ?

    ordering some more 50#'s !

    - lotta great GTHP r22's from the 1970's on , still running like a basement fridge...
    ... however, much work still needs to be done.
    CLOSED LOOP newer ratings are listed, but in numerical EER's Closed- is posted below OPEN LOOP EER's:

    http://www.energystar.gov/productfin...r=0&lastpage=1

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event