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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    93
    Yeah client was pretty pissed. We installed his system about 3 years ago. I spent most of my time there convincing the client it was an easy fix and that it wasn't going to affect efficiency, longevity, nor will it even be visible. After I peeled back the fins I realized the hole was a bit larger than it originally appeared... rather mangled.... Peeled back some more fins, cut out damaged section, spliced in new section. Battabing.

    Tech was very grateful... He didn't feel comfortably repairing it himself, which was fine. I would've guided him through the repair but, client was watching, it was getting late, and I didn't want to run the risk of him burning the thin tubing.

    And yeah, gas + refrigerant + labor + overtime = not a very happy boss the next morning.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    las vegas
    Posts
    1,505
    hope the screw didnr pierce both sides of the tubing.
    i think most of us havemade that same mistake at some point.
    just a part of the learning experiance.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    93
    No it didn't pierce through the bottom side... And that was also part of the reason I just spliced in another piece of 3/8, on top of it being a gaping hole. It was a 5/16" self tapping screw. If it was just your good old fashion 1/4" zip screw, it would've been easy to just build up some 15%.

    And yeah he'll be paying more attention to where he's putting screws from now on, good learning exp despite a silly mistake. He genuinely appreciated the help and throughout the repair was asking questions, giving me a hand, etc. Good guy...

    I've never ran a screw into a coil personally. Comparable mistakes? Absolutely. Ill be quick to admit, we all have made mistakes. Some are honest mistakes, some techs make careless mistakes, for instance:

    Just came behind another green tech yesterday too... He was out there for a short cycle complaint a couple days prior. Also after another tech had come out and the system was running normally the previous weekend. 2nd tech determined a low charge (???) causing problem... And "weighed it out, weighed it back in," slapped it on its ass and called it good. I went there when the client called back with the same complaint. I get there, unit is locking out in high head, resetting, etc. First thing I did was read the history, tried to contact the previous tech, no answer. Weighed out nearly 12lbs on a 6lb 2oz system. Properly charged system, determined original problem to be a poor connection at the Y terminal, causing "short cycle." Tried to explain to 2nd tech the problem and what he could do next time, it comes to the surface he had no clue what he was doing, when I was asking him his procedure and how he determined the low charge. Then rather than taking my feedback and trying to make it a constructive experience, he gets an attitude and says I must've fabricated everything to make him look bad. Appatently too much pride and not enough experience.

    I'm always the first one to lend a hand, provide constructive feedback, pass along knowledge etc. Pretty easy going. And when I don't know or am questioning something, I ask someone who might know or do the research. This little bastard probably will never get it with that attitude unfortunately.

    Just goes to show what will make a good technician or a bad technician.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Upper Michigan
    Posts
    3,589
    Quote Originally Posted by ComfortablyNumb View Post
    No it didn't pierce through the bottom side... And that was also part of the reason I just spliced in another piece of 3/8, on top of it being a gaping hole. It was a 5/16" self tapping screw. If it was just your good old fashion 1/4" zip screw, it would've been easy to just build up some 15%.

    And yeah he'll be paying more attention to where he's putting screws from now on, good learning exp despite a silly mistake. He genuinely appreciated the help and throughout the repair was asking questions, giving me a hand, etc. Good guy...

    I've never ran a screw into a coil personally. Comparable mistakes? Absolutely. Ill be quick to admit, we all have made mistakes. Some are honest mistakes, some techs make careless mistakes, for instance:

    Just came behind another green tech yesterday too... He was out there for a short cycle complaint a couple days prior. Also after another tech had come out and the system was running normally the previous weekend. 2nd tech determined a low charge (???) causing problem... And "weighed it out, weighed it back in," slapped it on its ass and called it good. I went there when the client called back with the same complaint. I get there, unit is locking out in high head, resetting, etc. First thing I did was read the history, tried to contact the previous tech, no answer. Weighed out nearly 12lbs on a 6lb 2oz system. Properly charged system, determined original problem to be a poor connection at the Y terminal, causing "short cycle." Tried to explain to 2nd tech the problem and what he could do next time, it comes to the surface he had no clue what he was doing, when I was asking him his procedure and how he determined the low charge. Then rather than taking my feedback and trying to make it a constructive experience, he gets an attitude and says I must've fabricated everything to make him look bad. Appatently too much pride and not enough experience.

    I'm always the first one to lend a hand, provide constructive feedback, pass along knowledge etc. Pretty easy going. And when I don't know or am questioning something, I ask someone who might know or do the research. This little bastard probably will never get it with that attitude unfortunately.

    Just goes to show what will make a good technician or a bad technician.
    I'm pretty green on the a/c, when I get to hang out with a good tech I love to pick there brain any chance I get. That don't happen very often though. Sometimes when we get embarrassed we get defensive that's a problem some people have to get over. For me I sit on here and read a/c stuff as much as I can to help me out.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Southern Indiana
    Posts
    94
    Been there done that. **** happens. I found a unit that was missing a screw and thought I would replace but apparently used to long of a screw and pierced the coil.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    6,352
    Quote Originally Posted by ComfortablyNumb View Post
    Hmm not sure if the attachment worked... Here's the pic:

    So what's the rest of the story ?

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    93
    Quote Originally Posted by Joehvac25 View Post
    I'm pretty green on the a/c, when I get to hang out with a good tech I love to pick there brain any chance I get. That don't happen very often though. Sometimes when we get embarrassed we get defensive that's a problem some people have to get over. For me I sit on here and read a/c stuff as much as I can to help me out.
    Picking peoples brains, doing your own research, not being embarrassed to ask questions/call tech support/TSA's when in doubt is what will give you the most knowledge. I can understand getting embarrassed/defensive, and to a certain degree its expected from anybody that takes pride in what they do. Nobody knows everything, and even for the BEST, it's a never ending learning experience.

    Quote Originally Posted by GOVHVAC View Post
    Been there done that. **** happens. I found a unit that was missing a screw and thought I would replace but apparently used to long of a screw and pierced the coil.
    It's possible that a screw was never meant to be there... Last company I worked for, we'd just set a 40 ton RTU, and one of our guys goes "man, it really looks like there should be a screw there..." And before any of us could say anything.... PSSSSSSSHHHHHHHH. Woops.

    Quote Originally Posted by VTP99 View Post
    So what's the rest of the story ?
    I posted earlier in the thread... But long story short, arrived to the unit at about 5pm, spent some time putting the client at ease. Peeled back/cut away some fins, replaced and brazed in small section of tubing (hole was pretty damn big, and wasn't 100% sure the bottom wasn't punctured as well), checked for leaks, vacuum and held 400 microns, charged back to factory + line length, start/test, unit was running and looking beautifully like it never happened. Client was fine... Made it home well before dark after the hour drive. Boss gave the tech a verbal kick in the balls the next morning, but now its water under the bridge.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    6,352
    Quote Originally Posted by ComfortablyNumb View Post



    I posted earlier in the thread... But long story short, arrived to the unit at about 5pm, spent some time putting the client at ease. Peeled back/cut away some fins, replaced and brazed in small section of tubing (hole was pretty damn big, and wasn't 100% sure the bottom wasn't punctured as well), checked for leaks, vacuum and held 400 microns, charged back to factory + line length, start/test, unit was running and looking beautifully like it never happened. Client was fine... Made it home well before dark after the hour drive. Boss gave the tech a verbal kick in the balls the next morning, but now its water under the bridge.

    Nice job keep up the good work.

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Regina,SK
    Posts
    153
    I never get upset over those types of calls, as I was young and stupid once. Actually I still am

    But now I know how to fix my eff ups. I love helping fellow techs and always will because I know what it`s like to be in over my head. The guys I help are always attentive and learn from their mistakes and that`s all I can ask for.

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