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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    burlington county n.j.
    Posts
    9,754
    southern nj, i have never seen res 3 phase

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Pacific Coast of Canada
    Posts
    4,008

    Cool Here is a residential home.

    That has three phase power. The electrical panels take up a 20' x 8' high wall just to the lfet of this picture. They help to power the 6000 cfm Dryotron we installed and a few boilers as well.
    Trust me, I know what I'm doing.

  3. #16
    OMG!

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Phoenix,AZ
    Posts
    33
    I believe that a lot of houses built here in Phx in the late '50s and early '60s had 3-phase. I've heard that in those days the only units available for central air were commercial units and were all 3-phase. I guess the power companies were willing to bear the addl expense of the infrastructure so they could sell more electricity to the customer. Otherwise, the home would be built with only swamp cooling and would use less power.

    When I'm in an older neighborhood, I like to spot which poles have 3-phase service (easy to spot the extra transformer) and which houses actually have the third leg wired. Houses that were built with swamp and then converted to AC later typically have single phase units even though 3-phase was available. I suspect it is only because the installing company didn't consider offering the 3-phase installation.

    The cheaper cost of installing one 7.5 ton 3-phase unit, compared with two single-phase units, would provide a little offset for the cost of having 3-phase service installed (if the power co is willing). It would be interesting to know just how those numbers stack up.





  5. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Barrie, Ontario
    Posts
    4,622
    Originally posted by Collin
    That has three phase power. The electrical panels take up a 20' x 8' high wall just to the lfet of this picture. They help to power the 6000 cfm Dryotron we installed and a few boilers as well.
    You couldn't like this guy very much since you installed one of those new suicide draft diverters on the left hand boiler.

    Who the customer? Paul Martin? Ralph Klein? Rick Mercer?

    Is this a Fabreze moment? C.Y.D. I'm voting white elephant. 2’.
    My competition are my best salespeople!

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    11,808
    Extra transformer as in two on the pole, high leg?

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Pacific Coast of Canada
    Posts
    4,008

    Red face I don't mean to sound flippant .......

    But I don't remember.
    I mean, I remember staring at the hole in the ground that was to become the pool, but that was six years ago!
    You are asking me a question that I would immediatley refer to Sparky.

    Oh and since this pic was taken, we connected the draft hood.
    Trust me, I know what I'm doing.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    9,871

    Several locations

    In our area have residential 3 phase power.

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    11,808
    Originally posted by Sunnyphx


    When I'm in an older neighborhood, I like to spot which poles have 3-phase service (easy to spot the extra transformer) and which houses actually have the third leg wired.
    Extra as in two transformers on the pole?

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Barrie, Ontario
    Posts
    4,622
    3 phase in the house..

    wow!

    Could give a whole new meaning to the spin cycle on my wife's washer.

    A sump pump that fires directly over my neighbours house to get the idiot on the other side. Hmmm.

    3 phase air hockey table... has potential, right?
    Is this a Fabreze moment? C.Y.D. I'm voting white elephant. 2’.
    My competition are my best salespeople!

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Phoenix,AZ
    Posts
    33
    Carnak: Yes, two transformers, with a high leg (delta). One transformer is significantly smaller than the other, and it is the one that supplies the high leg. Since the 3-ph load (only the AC) is only a fraction of the total service to the house, the high leg transformer doesn't have to have the load capacity of the main transformer. At least, that's how it was explained to me.

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