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  1. #53
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    44
    I would be a rich man if i could get people to replace thier 10 year old systems. Thats just gettin broke in. But, here in michigan, our cooling system is not terribly long. I could maybe see a system in southern states being worn out in 10 years.

  2. #54
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Lynchburg, VA
    Posts
    22
    There have been a lot of posts with "CYA" as the reason for checking capacitors on a PM. While that is a valid reason, take it to the next level.

    When you check and document, things like capacitors, you are establishing yourself (and your company) as a professional with the customer and within our industry. Offer to replace the part during the service and avoid a truck/trip charge. It's back in the customer's court and you'll look REALLY GOOD if in fact the old capacitor fails within a few days.

    In addition to that, when the homeowner calls to complain that you did something wrong to their unit, the office can bring up your service ticket and read it back. Now you and your company can be seen as having provided a thorough PM and possibly setting yourself apart from the others.

  3. #55
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    876
    An operating motor is not a good method to tell if the capacitor was bad.
    I followed up on another tech who had a system frozen up. A water source heat pump had a frozen evap coil and was dripping water from the case. The previous tech declared the issue was insulation stuck in the blower wheel.

    I arrived and found it frozen again. The blower was operating but sounded a little slow. The run cap had failed. Operated much faster with a new cap.
    Always start your diagnostic over after you've fixed the obvious problem You will frequently find something else going on..
    I am for doing good to the poor, but...I think the best way of doing good to the poor, is not making them easy in poverty, but leading or driving them out of it. I observed...that the more public provisions were made for the poor, the less they provided for themselves, and of course became poorer. And, on the contrary, the less was done for them, the more they did for themselves, and became richer.
    ― Benjamin Franklin

  4. #56
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    93
    Never a reason not the check a capacitor no matter what the age of the system or the visual apperance of ANY component. Preventative maintenance has much more purpose than just hosing down the OD unit and changing the filter. Have you ever walked up to a failed compressor with a capacitor looking like a soda can that's been left in the freezer? I have. Granted, a situation such as so likely would be due to more factors than a weak capacitor alone and who knows if the "chicken came before the egg" but point being, for the sake of the motor, overall condition of the system, and for the sake of the client, check every capacitor. Your new employer will like you much more with less callbacks and more revenue - and this is revenue that is also doing justice for your client. And if you do find that a capacitor you normally wouldn't check because it "looks okay"... well... Weak capacitors can mean more problems are present. But they can also just mean.... weak and old capacitors....

    But as far as a "callback" goes - coinflip - I've checked caps and measured ~98% only to have a failure in the weeks to come, a couple times in my career. It can indeed be a crapshoot and things do happen, but not only does proper preventative maintenance need to be performed for the sake of the client, you also need to cover your ass, all the while you need to do your job for your company too. Not saying you did anything horribly wrong, but depending on each situation and each client, things like this need to be avoided as much as humanly possible also for the sake of reputation and revenue. Most importantly, the paying client.

  5. #57
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Rising Sun, Maryland, United States
    Posts
    110
    i check the cap's every time i go out becuase alot of our customers have 8+ years old systems and in MD we usually have pretty hot summers and pretty cold winters so the a/c and heat runs a good bit and out of say 5 calls a day i usually end up replacing 2 due to being weak cause there has been times when the customer says leave it and i go back 2 weeks later and the cap is shot. its an easy fix and easy check so why not do it? it takes what 20 secs to check a capacitor

  6. #58
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Phoenix,AZ
    Posts
    315
    I always check caps I have replaced a lot while doing a tune up.


    I had one recently that took a crap a month later that checked out fine but there are no guarantees when the unit runs 24/7 here in the summer.

    I have also seen a couple that have hard starts and will run but the cap is bad and the compressor pulls more amps.

  7. #59
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    469
    I would be more concern that a tech called you on a saturday night to question You. He's well aware that many things could of happened in 23 days. So he associated your guilt by asking u if u checked. And im sure your morals kicked in and said no. Monday if u get slack and that mechanic starts wining how he missed an Important social event blah blah blah to fix something that could of been avoided. I would have a sit-down not with him but your morals. If u do a lot of calls per day your answer is Not sure been a while Ill check paper work but i always do my job well and based off the existing day schedule. Your work order should always use Broad statements, All amps up too Par,, Coils brushed as Needed. Left unit operating 100 percent CUSTOMER is happy. This covers u if the customer changes there mind about not being happy probably because the high qote your boss just sent.
    Your defense is look when I left the customer was fine heres the sig

  8. #60
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    469
    Quote Originally Posted by zartangreen View Post
    I would be more concern that a tech called you on a saturday night to question You. He's well aware that many things could of happened in 23 days. So he associated your guilt by asking u if u checked. And im sure your morals kicked in and said no. Monday if u get slack and that mechanic starts wining how he missed an Important social event blah blah blah to fix something that could of been avoided. I would have a sit-down not with him but your morals. If u do a lot of calls per day your answer is Not sure been a while Ill check paper work but i always do my job well and based off the existing day schedule. Your work order should always use Broad statements, All amps up too Par,, Coils brushed as Needed. Left unit operating 100 percent CUSTOMER is happy. This covers u if the customer changes there mind about not being happy probably because the high qote your boss just sent.
    Your defense is look when I left the customer was fine heres the sig

    wed night,, still after hours oops

  9. #61
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    3,192
    I would think the company you work for has a standard list of what to check on all PM calls. If there is no standard given & the unit is working O.K. when you leave then I don't see how they can fault you for anything that goes wrong afterwards. If a capacitor check is on their list of things to do on PM's & you didn't check it then I can see a problem with responsibility because there's no way to know if it would have checked good or bad at the time. I almost never do PM's because I believe they create revenue a lot more than they prevent problems. When I install a new system I always get asked about PM & I tell my customers to change their filters regularly & that's all the PM you need. I tell them to call me in about 5 or 10 years if nothing breaks down before then if you want me to service the system but that's it. Now gas & oil systems are a different story but we don't see much of that in my area.
    Gary
    -----------
    http://www.oceanhvac.com
    An engineer designs what he would never work on.
    A technician works on what he would never design.

  10. #62
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Delaware
    Posts
    14
    If the cap tested fine on pm then no call back. If we replaced everything that looked iffy then there would be a lot more replacements going on

  11. #63
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    67,913
    Stohr, do you have 2 user names?
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  12. #64
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Delaware
    Posts
    14
    Don't think so why?

  13. #65
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    67,913
    Quote Originally Posted by Stohr View Post
    Don't think so why?
    Your email address.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

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