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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    UAE - Dubai
    Posts
    10

    HVAC engineer development

    Hi all

    1st of all, I would like to mention that I am glad to find this great website. I am a Mechatronics Engineer, during my degree program, i had couple of courses of Refrigeration and air conditioning systems + load calculations.

    Now I would like to focus on HVAC engineering, so Im seeking for a guide to a start point from zero. In order to be an HVAC engineer and maybe a certified one, whats the best approach to develop myself, resources to read, courses or training.

    The reason I wanted to focus on HVAC is because a friend has an engineering company and we would like to start a new activity which is air conditioning design service for residential as a start and then maybe light commercial.

    I appreciate your co-operation. Waiting for the experts ..

    Regards

    Ahmad From Dubai - United Arab Emirates.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    st louis mo
    Posts
    334
    residential? lol, get real, you will go broke

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    UAE - Dubai
    Posts
    10
    mike dixon

    Hey, as i said it is a start for me to develop myself technically + there is a high demand on ACs for residences in my country since today is 48 degrees celcuis

    Thanks

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    GTA, ON
    Posts
    1,164
    Residential systems usually don't require engineering expertise. Any half-decent resi tech should be able to design and install a proper solution. Industrial-Commercial-Institutional is where you wanna be. Already being a mech eng is a huge leg up, but you will need to take some additional courses to develop a proper level of understanding for the subject. Here's a good resource to get you started http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...5&feature=plcp

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    up in the hizzy
    Posts
    1,289
    here in the US HVAC techs use ACCA manual J for residential load calculations, books and software can be purchase from the website: https://www.acca.org/store/

    As you know unlike the rest of the world we here use crappy inch-pound/Fahrenheit units, dont know if the ACCA has the manuals in metric units.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    UAE - Dubai
    Posts
    10
    Moonrunner

    in my country, the demand on residential applications is very high, we need the AC mostly even during winter. I understand that I need extra training and this is I posted this thread to know where to start from. I will check the link you provided.

    I appreciate it, Thanks

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    UAE - Dubai
    Posts
    10
    valdelocco

    Thanks for the link. I did the calculations based on ASHRAE standard in college, which uses the same units you mentioned (PI).

    thanks again

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    GTA, ON
    Posts
    1,164
    Ahmad, the demand may be high, but for resi applications, it's already been engineered at the factory. The technician runs the air distribution system (if there isn't a decent one in there already) based on established best practices and installs the equipment. If you wanna get in on the technical side of it, great.. We could use more engineers willing and able to get their hands dirty without making a mess of things. I'm just telling you that there is precious little engineering work done in resi applications and it's usually done by the manufacturers and techs.

    One resi scenario where it pays off to hire an engineer: When you're doing lots of identical units, like a townhouse complex, as a package deal, that's when the builder can save on space/equipment/materials if an engineer gets in there and starts tweaking the design.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    309

    Nope

    Heya Man
    Yes there is a need but I dont think you need to get a super degree to meet it. I think especially for residential you only need to get a degree in experience. Find the right guy or gal and hang with them for a while and they will teach you everything you need to know. I know from first hand experience! I have a 4 year deg from Ferris State in Michigan and I have not really had the chance to use the degree to often but to get my foot in the door for an interview. That was expensive but worth every penny.
    I say to you go big or go home! Residential unless you want your own company some day will bore you!!!!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Dacula, GA
    Posts
    12,017
    Need to get into duct design. A lot of installers don't give a crap about good air distribution. Manual D tells how to do it. ASHRAE Fundamentals Handbook 2009 Edition is even better. Get them and become an ace on proper air distribution / duct design and that should help you a lot along with load calculation which ASHRAE covers in the same book. Manual J is great but I like ASHRAE method in chapter 17 of Fundamentals book even better. Good luck
    "I could have ended the war in a month. I could have made North Vietnam look like a mud puddle."
    "I have little interest in streamlining government or in making it more efficient, for I mean to reduce its size. I do not undertake to promote welfare, for I propose to extend freedom. My aim is not to pass laws, but to repeal them."
    Barry Goldwater

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    up in the hizzy
    Posts
    1,289
    Ahmad,

    what kind of residential HVAC systems are predominant in your country?
    the middle east has a love affair with mini-splits,VRF etc.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    UAE - Dubai
    Posts
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by Moonrunner View Post
    Ahmad, the demand may be high, but for resi applications, it's already been engineered at the factory. The technician runs the air distribution system (if there isn't a decent one in there already) based on established best practices and installs the equipment. If you wanna get in on the technical side of it, great.. We could use more engineers willing and able to get their hands dirty without making a mess of things. I'm just telling you that there is precious little engineering work done in resi applications and it's usually done by the manufacturers and techs.

    One resi scenario where it pays off to hire an engineer: When you're doing lots of identical units, like a townhouse complex, as a package deal, that's when the builder can save on space/equipment/materials if an engineer gets in there and starts tweaking the design.
    Yup I agree 100% with you, the residential projects is the target as a start as you mentioned, the townhouse complexes which is so popular and increasing in here

    Thanks

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    UAE - Dubai
    Posts
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by durussel78 View Post
    Heya Man
    Yes there is a need but I dont think you need to get a super degree to meet it. I think especially for residential you only need to get a degree in experience. Find the right guy or gal and hang with them for a while and they will teach you everything you need to know. I know from first hand experience! I have a 4 year deg from Ferris State in Michigan and I have not really had the chance to use the degree to often but to get my foot in the door for an interview. That was expensive but worth every penny.
    I say to you go big or go home! Residential unless you want your own company some day will bore you!!!!
    Yes. it is a matter of going BIG ! You are totally right thanks for passing by.

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